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The EU dairy sector: Main features, challenges and prospects

17-12-2018

The EU dairy sector is the second biggest agricultural sector in the EU, representing more than 12 % of total agricultural output. While milk is produced in all Member States, farm and herd sizes, yields and types of farming vary widely across Europe, from free-range farming in Alpine areas to large specialised dairy farms in the north-west and centre of Europe. In 2016, 157 million tonnes of milk were delivered to dairies, where raw milk is processed into fresh products such as cheese or butter. ...

The EU dairy sector is the second biggest agricultural sector in the EU, representing more than 12 % of total agricultural output. While milk is produced in all Member States, farm and herd sizes, yields and types of farming vary widely across Europe, from free-range farming in Alpine areas to large specialised dairy farms in the north-west and centre of Europe. In 2016, 157 million tonnes of milk were delivered to dairies, where raw milk is processed into fresh products such as cheese or butter. Part of the common agricultural policy, the EU's dairy policy consists of a range of instruments designed to support farmers and address market imbalances. In particular, it includes common market organisation, public intervention and private storage provisions, direct payments and rural development measures. The policy has been constantly updated over time, one recent development being the suppression of milk quotas in 2015. The 2014 to 2016 crisis, during which raw milk prices dropped dramatically from around 40 to 25.7 cents per litre, triggered a reaction by the Commission based on public intervention-buying, private storage and a range of exceptional measures. Two aid packages were adopted, including incentives for farmers to reduce production. Recovery was in sight by 2017. In the coming years, growing EU and global demand is expected to support world dairy markets, without hindering price fluctuations and market imbalances. Resilience and sustainability are key words for the future of the sector. This can be achieved with innovation, as a way to reconcile the need for farmers to earn a decent living, consumer demand for affordable and quality dairy products, and environmental/animal health requirements.

CAP strategic plans

04-12-2018

The Commission's legislative proposals on the future of the common agricultural policy (CAP) were published on 1 June 2018. They comprise three proposals: a regulation setting out rules on support for CAP strategic plans; a regulation on the single common market organisation (CMO) and a horizontal regulation on financing, managing and monitoring the CAP. The proposal for a regulation on CAP strategic plans introduces a new delivery model, described by the Commission as a fundamental shift in the ...

The Commission's legislative proposals on the future of the common agricultural policy (CAP) were published on 1 June 2018. They comprise three proposals: a regulation setting out rules on support for CAP strategic plans; a regulation on the single common market organisation (CMO) and a horizontal regulation on financing, managing and monitoring the CAP. The proposal for a regulation on CAP strategic plans introduces a new delivery model, described by the Commission as a fundamental shift in the CAP, involving a shift from compliance towards results and performance. It includes a new distribution of responsibilities between the EU and Member States. A new planning process is proposed which will cover both Pillar I (direct payments) and Pillar II (rural development) of the CAP. First edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Research for AGRI Committee - The sectoral approach in the CAP beyond 2020 and possible options to improve the EU food value chain

15-10-2018

This study addresses the current rules both the current European rules applicable to the Common Agricultural Market Organisation and the recent proposal of the Commission in the CAP beyond 2020. It also suggests possible improvements of the proposal. It was presented to the Committee on Agriculture and Rural Development on 15 October 2018.

This study addresses the current rules both the current European rules applicable to the Common Agricultural Market Organisation and the recent proposal of the Commission in the CAP beyond 2020. It also suggests possible improvements of the proposal. It was presented to the Committee on Agriculture and Rural Development on 15 October 2018.

Išorės autorius

Tomás García Azcárate, Institute of Economics, Geography and Demography, (Spanish Research Council - CSIC)

Research for AGRI Committee - The CAP beyond 2020: appraisal of the EC legislative proposals

08-10-2018

On the basis of the European Commission's proposals on the CAP after 2020 published on 1st June, the Committee on Agriculture and Rural Development and Policy Department B of the European Parliament have organise a Workshop on the "The Common Agricultural Policy beyond 2020: appraisal of the EC legislative proposals" in October 2018. This Workshop was structured in three parts: 1. The CAP Strategic Plans beyond 2020 : assessing the architecture and governance issues in order to achieve the EU-wide ...

On the basis of the European Commission's proposals on the CAP after 2020 published on 1st June, the Committee on Agriculture and Rural Development and Policy Department B of the European Parliament have organise a Workshop on the "The Common Agricultural Policy beyond 2020: appraisal of the EC legislative proposals" in October 2018. This Workshop was structured in three parts: 1. The CAP Strategic Plans beyond 2020 : assessing the architecture and governance issues in order to achieve the EU-wide objectives; 2. The CAP support beyond 2020: assessing the future structure of direct payments and the rural development interventions in the light of the EU agricultural and environmental challenges; and 3. The sectoral approach in the CAP beyond 2020 and possible options to improve the EU food value chain.

Išorės autorius

E. Erjavec; M. Lovec; L. Juvancic; T. Sumrada; I. Rac; R.A. Jongeneel; H. Silvis; K. Poppe; T. Garcia Azcarate

Research for AGRI Committee - Towards the Common Agricultural Policy beyond 2020: comparing the reform package with the current regulations

19-09-2018

This briefing note is written by the Policy Department for Structural and Cohesion Policies for the European Parliament’s Agricultural and Rural Development committee (AGRI Committee). The main purpose of the paper is to facilitate the legislative work of MEPs relating to the next reform of the CAP. The paper could additionally serve to explore and discuss the CAP proposals put forward by academics and stakeholders. Six dashboards set out how the CAP reform package (2021/2027) proposed by the European ...

This briefing note is written by the Policy Department for Structural and Cohesion Policies for the European Parliament’s Agricultural and Rural Development committee (AGRI Committee). The main purpose of the paper is to facilitate the legislative work of MEPs relating to the next reform of the CAP. The paper could additionally serve to explore and discuss the CAP proposals put forward by academics and stakeholders. Six dashboards set out how the CAP reform package (2021/2027) proposed by the European Commission on 1st June 2018 compares with the current CAP (2014/2020) regulations on a topic-by topic basis. The briefing note also offers some comments on the main elements of the legislative proposals in order to help the MEPs with their response to the Commission’s package. These comments are substantially based on the resolutions previously adopted by the Plenary of the European Parliament. Additional comments are also provided of a technical and explanatory nature. The opinions expressed in this document are the sole responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the European Parliament.

CAP reform post-2020 - Setting the scene

30-05-2018

The Commission announced its proposals for the common agricultural policy post-2020 at the end of November 2017 in the form of a communication on the future of food and farming. They include proposals for: greater simplification to be achieved through increased subsidiarity involving a new delivery model, more effective targeting of direct payments, a shift towards a more results-based approach, and higher ambitions in respect of resource efficiency, environmental care and climate action. Other elements ...

The Commission announced its proposals for the common agricultural policy post-2020 at the end of November 2017 in the form of a communication on the future of food and farming. They include proposals for: greater simplification to be achieved through increased subsidiarity involving a new delivery model, more effective targeting of direct payments, a shift towards a more results-based approach, and higher ambitions in respect of resource efficiency, environmental care and climate action. Other elements will involve addressing issues such as generational renewal, the investment gap in agriculture, the role of research, innovation and training, risk management and a new green architecture. Under the new delivery model, Member States will have responsibility for establishing a common agricultural policy (CAP) strategic plan; this would be subject to approval by the Commission and would continue to set the basic policy parameters for the CAP. The proposals have generated a range of responses and have been the subject of discussion within the European Parliament's Committee for Agriculture and Rural Development. The Council has discussed the content of the communications and they have also been the subject of discussion by the Committee of the Regions (CoR) and the European Economic and Social Committee (EESC). Looking to the future, some reflections on the Commission's proposals are considered in light of the views expressed by a number of stakeholder groups. The Bulgarian Presidency has indicated that the future of the common agricultural policy will be discussed at the informal meeting of Ministers of Agriculture in Sofia in June 2018.

Agricultural education and lifelong training in the EU

24-10-2017

European farmers fulfil a vital role in providing safe and affordable food to nearly 500 million European citizens, and maintaining their countries' landscapes. However, the farming population is ageing and generational renewal has become a crucial issue. The farming sector needs to attract a new generation of farmers with the necessary skills to live and work in a challenging context. They will have to produce more efficiently while protecting the environment; contribute to the fight against climate ...

European farmers fulfil a vital role in providing safe and affordable food to nearly 500 million European citizens, and maintaining their countries' landscapes. However, the farming population is ageing and generational renewal has become a crucial issue. The farming sector needs to attract a new generation of farmers with the necessary skills to live and work in a challenging context. They will have to produce more efficiently while protecting the environment; contribute to the fight against climate change; meet society's demands regarding healthy and balanced diets; and keep up with increasingly rapid scientific and technological progress. It is therefore essential that farmers benefit from adequate agricultural education and training and acquire the various skills needed to adapt to a changing environment. On average, only 8.5 % of the present generation of European farmers have received full agricultural training, and 70 % have only practical experience. Initial training is a national competence and agricultural education systems vary widely throughout the EU. They provide the path to a wide range of careers in agriculture and forestry and deliver degrees in a number of disciplines, from diploma courses with a vocational orientation to bachelor degrees or doctorates in applied sciences. The current common agricultural policy places strong emphasis on knowledge sharing and innovation. It provides for specific measures to help farmers access advice and training throughout their working lives. Support is also provided for innovation via the European innovation partnership network for agricultural productivity and sustainability (EIP-Agri). In several recent resolutions, the European Parliament has stressed the importance of education and training for farmers, in particular as a way to foster their ability to work in an ever-evolving sector.

Rural poverty in the European Union

13-03-2017

In 2015, 119 million European citizens, representing almost a quarter of the EU population, were at risk of poverty and social exclusion. Statistics show that the average poverty rate is slightly higher in rural areas, with very contrasting situations across the Union as some countries display a huge poverty gap between rural and urban areas. Rural poverty, which appears to be less documented than urban poverty, is linked to the specific disadvantages of rural areas. These include an unfavourable ...

In 2015, 119 million European citizens, representing almost a quarter of the EU population, were at risk of poverty and social exclusion. Statistics show that the average poverty rate is slightly higher in rural areas, with very contrasting situations across the Union as some countries display a huge poverty gap between rural and urban areas. Rural poverty, which appears to be less documented than urban poverty, is linked to the specific disadvantages of rural areas. These include an unfavourable demographic situation, a weaker labour market, limited access to education and also remoteness and rural isolation. The latter is associated with a lack of basic services such as healthcare and social services, and with increased costs for inhabitants on account of travel distances. These factors are considered to be the main drivers of rural poverty. Through their interaction, they can generate a spiral of decline in which poverty can become entrenched. While the fight against poverty and social exclusion lies primarily within the remit of the Member States and their regions, this issue is at the heart of the Europe 2020 strategy for smart, sustainable and inclusive growth. Several EU funds and policies can contribute to alleviating poverty, in particular the current EU rural development policy which, for the first time, includes a priority relating to the promotion of social inclusion, poverty reduction and economic development in rural areas. Within this policy, Member States and regions can use EU funding to implement measures that, although not directly targeting poverty reduction, may help tackle those drivers of poverty in many ways, such as fostering job creation, improving services, developing infrastructure for information and communications technologies (ICT), and enhancing access to education. In this regard, local strategies such as the Leader method are particularly suited to supporting disadvantaged groups.

Afghan opium production reaches record high

15-01-2014

Afghan opium production increased 49% in 2013, reaching a record high. According to the UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), potential production was even higher, limited only by unfavourable weather conditions, while eradication efforts diminished. The drug trade helps sustain the military conflict and, with presidential elections in 2014 as well as the planned draw-down of foreign troops, it could contribute to an escalation in coming years.

Afghan opium production increased 49% in 2013, reaching a record high. According to the UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), potential production was even higher, limited only by unfavourable weather conditions, while eradication efforts diminished. The drug trade helps sustain the military conflict and, with presidential elections in 2014 as well as the planned draw-down of foreign troops, it could contribute to an escalation in coming years.

Food supply chain in Europe

26-09-2011

Recent fluctuations in food prices have drawn attention to the need to ensure a properly functioning food supply chain.  

Recent fluctuations in food prices have drawn attention to the need to ensure a properly functioning food supply chain.  

Būsimi renginiai

01-10-2019
Health threats from climate change: Scientific evidence for policy-making
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