9

rezultāts(-i)

Vārds(-i)
Publikācijas veids
Politikas joma
Jautājuma autors
Atslēgvārds
Datums

The EU, a world leader in fighting climate change

29-05-2018

The European Union is at the forefront of international efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and thus safeguard the planet's climate. Greenhouse gases (GHG) – primarily carbon dioxide but also others, including methane and chlorofluorocarbons – trap heat in the atmosphere, leading to global warming. Higher temperatures then act on the climate, with varying effects. For example, dry regions might become drier while, at the poles, the ice caps are melting, causing higher sea levels. In 2016, ...

The European Union is at the forefront of international efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and thus safeguard the planet's climate. Greenhouse gases (GHG) – primarily carbon dioxide but also others, including methane and chlorofluorocarbons – trap heat in the atmosphere, leading to global warming. Higher temperatures then act on the climate, with varying effects. For example, dry regions might become drier while, at the poles, the ice caps are melting, causing higher sea levels. In 2016, the global average temperature was already 1.1°C above pre-industrial levels.

Ārējais autors

Klugman, Cornelia;

Clean Vehicles Directive

22-03-2018

This note seeks to provide an initial analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission's impact assessment (IA) accompanying the above-mentioned proposal, adopted on 8 November 2017 and referred to the Parliament's Committee on Environment, Public Health and Food Safety (ENVI). The proposal aims to increase the market uptake of clean – low- and zero-emission — vehicles in the context of public procurement operations, thus contributing to reduction of transport emissions, as well ...

This note seeks to provide an initial analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission's impact assessment (IA) accompanying the above-mentioned proposal, adopted on 8 November 2017 and referred to the Parliament's Committee on Environment, Public Health and Food Safety (ENVI). The proposal aims to increase the market uptake of clean – low- and zero-emission — vehicles in the context of public procurement operations, thus contributing to reduction of transport emissions, as well as stimulating competitiveness and growth in the transport sector (explanatory memorandum of the proposal, p. 3).

Nature-based solutions: Concept, opportunities and challenges

27-10-2017

Nature-based solutions are actions inspired by, supported by or copied from nature that aim to help societies address a variety of environmental, social and economic challenges in sustainable ways. Most nature-based solutions do not have a single objective, but aim to bring multiple co-benefits. The concept emerged in the 2000s to promote nature as a source of solutions to challenges associated with climate change. It has been supported and broadened by the International Union for the Conservation ...

Nature-based solutions are actions inspired by, supported by or copied from nature that aim to help societies address a variety of environmental, social and economic challenges in sustainable ways. Most nature-based solutions do not have a single objective, but aim to bring multiple co-benefits. The concept emerged in the 2000s to promote nature as a source of solutions to challenges associated with climate change. It has been supported and broadened by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature and later by the European Commission. In European Union (EU) policy, nature-based solutions are primarily addressed through the Horizon 2020 framework programme for research and innovation, which allocated approximately €185 million to the topic between 2014 and 2020. Other EU funds, estimated at €915 million per year, are also allocated to support green infrastructure projects. Other relevant policy initiatives include the 7th environment action programme, the biodiversity strategy, and the communication on green infrastructure. Nature-based solutions can provide a number of opportunities, including: delivering multiple benefits; reducing and/or avoiding costs; contributing to job creation and the green economy; and positioning the EU as a world leader in the area. However, nature-based solutions can also pose a number of challenges, including: tackling knowledge gaps; managing trade-offs; implementing successful actions; dealing with natural elements; and financing projects. The European Parliament has expressed support for nature-based solutions and urged Member States and the European Commission to establish a coherent network of blue-green infrastructure in rural and urban areas across the EU.

European Environment Agency: Mission, governance, output

02-06-2017

The European Environment Agency (EEA) is an agency of the European Union; it was established in 1993 and has its seat in Copenhagen. Its main mission is to provide the EU with objective, reliable and comparable information on the basis of which to conduct environment policy, assess environmental impacts and inform the public about the state of the environment. The Agency's main clients are the European Commission, the European Parliament and the Council, as well as its 33 member countries. Its main ...

The European Environment Agency (EEA) is an agency of the European Union; it was established in 1993 and has its seat in Copenhagen. Its main mission is to provide the EU with objective, reliable and comparable information on the basis of which to conduct environment policy, assess environmental impacts and inform the public about the state of the environment. The Agency's main clients are the European Commission, the European Parliament and the Council, as well as its 33 member countries. Its main bodies are the Management Board, which sets the main course, the Executive Director, who heads the Agency, and the Scientific Committee, which provides advice. The EEA has a budget of about €50 million and employs about 200 staff. The EEA's work is supported by the European Environment Information and Observation Network (Eionet), which is made up of European topic centres (consortia of organisations with expertise in a given area) and about 1 500 experts from national environmental organisations. The work of the EEA is based on five-yearly multiannual work programmes implemented through annual work programmes. The Agency's flagship publication is the report on the state and outlook of the European environment (SOER), which provides an assessment of the European environment, trends and prospects. Regular evaluations of the Agency and Eionet are programmed to take place every five years. The European Commission is currently carrying out a 'fitness check' evaluation of the two structures, with conclusions expected by the end of 2017. The European Parliament recognises the role of the EEA as a provider of information on the environment. It recently issued a series of recommendations regarding, among other things, transparency, gender balance, indicators and resources.

Circular economy with focus on waste, renewable energy and sustainable bioenergy in Estonia

15-05-2017

This briefing reviews Estonia’s progress in the transition to a circular economy, focusing on a three crucial and related policy areas: waste, renewable energy and sustainable bioenergy. A key challenge for Estonia in terms of moving to a circular economy will be to strengthen recycling, as well as high rates of separate collection in cities including Tallinn – Estonia is not on track to meet the EU’s 2020 targets for municipal solid waste recycling. • The share of renewable energy has increased ...

This briefing reviews Estonia’s progress in the transition to a circular economy, focusing on a three crucial and related policy areas: waste, renewable energy and sustainable bioenergy. A key challenge for Estonia in terms of moving to a circular economy will be to strengthen recycling, as well as high rates of separate collection in cities including Tallinn – Estonia is not on track to meet the EU’s 2020 targets for municipal solid waste recycling. • The share of renewable energy has increased strongly in the past ten years, due mainly to a growth in wind power and biomass, which is used for household heating and for district heating. The intensity of forest use is among the highest in the EU. As a large share of Estonian forests will reach maturity in coming years, Estonia has the capacity to extract greater levels of biomass.

Ārējais autors

Tony Zamparutti, Alicia McNeill, Harri Moora, Maarja Joe and Evelin Piirsalu

Freshwater protection: EU policy and the status of freshwater systems

15-02-2017

Freshwater ecosystems are particularly rich in biodiversity and fulfil important ecosystem services. However, the continuing presence of pollutants still raises concerns for public health, as well as for nature conservation. Surface water bodies and groundwater alike are threatened by synthetic and also naturally occurring substances that can have a negative impact on the aquatic environment and on human health. Increased temperature and over-abstraction of water are further causes for concern. Meanwhile ...

Freshwater ecosystems are particularly rich in biodiversity and fulfil important ecosystem services. However, the continuing presence of pollutants still raises concerns for public health, as well as for nature conservation. Surface water bodies and groundwater alike are threatened by synthetic and also naturally occurring substances that can have a negative impact on the aquatic environment and on human health. Increased temperature and over-abstraction of water are further causes for concern. Meanwhile, heavy modifications to the natural flow and physical changes to water bodies can also cause serious disturbances to water ecosystems. With the Water Framework Directive (WFD), the EU adopted comprehensive legislation for the protection of water within the EU. Under the directive, Member States are required to achieve good status in all bodies of surface water and groundwater by 2015, or 2027 at the latest. Unfortunately, despite considerable improvements in water quality, this goal was not achieved by the end of 2015 as hoped.

Invasive alien species: List of species of Union concern

15-12-2015

According to the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), invasive alien species (IAS) are the second most significant threat to biodiversity after habitat loss. They are also capable of causing significant damage to human health and to the economy. The cost of controlling invasive alien species and repairing the harm they do in the EU is estimated at €12 billion annually. To tackle this cross-border issue, an EU Regulation on IAS was adopted in 2014 and entered into force in January ...

According to the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), invasive alien species (IAS) are the second most significant threat to biodiversity after habitat loss. They are also capable of causing significant damage to human health and to the economy. The cost of controlling invasive alien species and repairing the harm they do in the EU is estimated at €12 billion annually. To tackle this cross-border issue, an EU Regulation on IAS was adopted in 2014 and entered into force in January 2015. The European Commission had to submit to Member States' representatives a list of 'invasive alien species of Union concern' by January 2016, as an EU wide containment measure. Under the Regulation, the list of IAS of Union concern will contain only species that are scientifically proven to be particularly harmful and that can be addressed in a cost-efficient manner. The compilation of the list is not a one-off exercise, but is intended as an ongoing process. NGOs and the European Parliament have criticised the draft list for being too short and for not including some species which they consider are particularly widespread and harmful to ecosystems.

How the EU budget is spent: LIFE programme

16-02-2015

LIFE, the EU's only funding programme entirely devoted to environmental objectives, is meant to act as a catalyst for developments in this policy area. Its achievements since 1992 include: improved conservation and restoration of some 4.7 million hectares of land; higher air quality for some 12 million people; waste prevention of around 300 000 tonnes; and recycling of a further 1 million tonnes. For 2014-20, LIFE has two components: environment and climate action. In addition, the EU 'mainstreams ...

LIFE, the EU's only funding programme entirely devoted to environmental objectives, is meant to act as a catalyst for developments in this policy area. Its achievements since 1992 include: improved conservation and restoration of some 4.7 million hectares of land; higher air quality for some 12 million people; waste prevention of around 300 000 tonnes; and recycling of a further 1 million tonnes. For 2014-20, LIFE has two components: environment and climate action. In addition, the EU 'mainstreams' these objectives into many funding programmes, with the aim of allocating 20% of its 2014-20 resources to climate-related expenditure.

Directory of the Most Important Community Legislative Measures in Environment Policy

01-04-1995

Gaidāmie notikumi

20-11-2019
Europe's Future: Where next for EU institutional Reform?
Cits pasākums -
EPRS

Partneri

Sekojiet jaunumiem!

email update imageE-pasta paziņojumu sistēma

Informēšanas sistēma pa e-pastu nosūta jaunāko informāciju uz jūsu e-pasta adresi un ļauj sekot visām ar Parlamentu saistītajām personām un notikumiem. Tā sniedz jaunāko informāciju no deputātiem, informācijas dienestiem un Ideju laboratorijas.

Sistēma ir pieejama no jebkuras Parlamenta vietnes lapas. Lai abonētu un saņemtu Ideju laboratorijas ziņojumus, pietiek norādīt e-pasta adresi, izvēlēties interesējošās tēmas, sūtīšanas biežumu (katru dienu, reizi nedēļā vai mēnesī) un apstiprināt reģistrāciju, uzklikšķinot uz e-pastā nosūtītās saites.

RSS imageRSS barotnes

Nepalaidiet garām informāciju vai jaunumus Eiropas Parlamenta vietnē, piesakoties uz RSS barotni.

Uzklikšķiniet uz zemāk redzamās saites, lai konfigurētu barotni.