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Data tal-pubblikazzjoni: 16-01-2019

The new European electronic communications code

16-01-2019

European telecom rules were last updated in 2009. To make them fit for the digital era the Commission proposed a new Electronic Communications Code in September 2016. The provisional agreement reached in June 2018 was adopted by the Parliament and then by the Council in November 2018. Member States have until 21 December 2020 to transpose the new directive into national legislation. The new rules include measures to stimulate investment in and take-up of very high capacity networks in the EU as well ...

European telecom rules were last updated in 2009. To make them fit for the digital era the Commission proposed a new Electronic Communications Code in September 2016. The provisional agreement reached in June 2018 was adopted by the Parliament and then by the Council in November 2018. Member States have until 21 December 2020 to transpose the new directive into national legislation. The new rules include measures to stimulate investment in and take-up of very high capacity networks in the EU as well as new spectrum rules for mobile connectivity and 5G. The Code also ensures that all citizens have access to affordable communication, including the internet. It increases consumer protection and security for users and facilitates regulatory intervention. Furthermore, it introduces a 'reverse 112 system' which would alert citizens by text message in case of imminent serious emergencies or disasters (from June 2022). During negotiations the Parliament secured for citizens cheaper caps for intra-EU calls and SMS from 15 May 2019. Fourth edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. Please note this document has been designed for on-line viewing.

Revised Energy Efficiency Directive

16-01-2019

On 30 November 2016, the European Commission presented a proposal for a revised Energy Efficiency Directive, as part of the Clean Energy package. This aims to adapt and align EU energy legislation with the 2030 energy and climate goals, and contribute towards delivering the energy union strategy. The Commission initially proposed a 30 % binding EU energy efficiency target for 2030, to be achieved by means of indicative national targets and the extension beyond 2020 of the energy savings obligation ...

On 30 November 2016, the European Commission presented a proposal for a revised Energy Efficiency Directive, as part of the Clean Energy package. This aims to adapt and align EU energy legislation with the 2030 energy and climate goals, and contribute towards delivering the energy union strategy. The Commission initially proposed a 30 % binding EU energy efficiency target for 2030, to be achieved by means of indicative national targets and the extension beyond 2020 of the energy savings obligation scheme, which currently requires utility companies to help their consumers use 1.5 % less energy each year. The Commission proposal also aims to make the rules on energy metering and billing clearer for consumers. Trilogue negotiations started in February 2018 and resulted in a provisional agreement among the EU Institutions on 19 June 2018. The final text was formally adopted by Parliament (13 November 2018) and Council (4 December 2018). It was published in the Official Journal on 21 December 2018 and entered into force three days later. Member States are required to transpose most of the revised directive by 25 June 2020, although the provisions on metering and billing can be transposed by 25 October 2020. Fifth edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Awtur estern

Wilson, Alex

Governance of the energy union

16-01-2019

The Commission proposed a regulation on governance of the energy union, as part of its Clean Energy package (30 November 2016). The proposal aims to simplify the process of monitoring progress and help to implement the goals of Energy Union, in particular the 2030 EU targets on renewables, energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions. National energy and climate plans are to be prepared for the 2021-2030 period, followed by progress reports. Both plans and reports will use binding templates, and ...

The Commission proposed a regulation on governance of the energy union, as part of its Clean Energy package (30 November 2016). The proposal aims to simplify the process of monitoring progress and help to implement the goals of Energy Union, in particular the 2030 EU targets on renewables, energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions. National energy and climate plans are to be prepared for the 2021-2030 period, followed by progress reports. Both plans and reports will use binding templates, and gain early input from the Commission. The proposed regulation envisages national and EU registries and inventories on greenhouse gas emissions for the post-2020 period, as a means to assess progress in meeting the goals of the Paris Climate Change Agreement. Trilogue negotiations started in February 2018 and concluded with a provisional agreement on 20 June 2018. The final text was formally adopted by Parliament (13 November 2018) and Council (4 December 2018). It was published in the Official Journal on 21 December 2018 and entered into force three days later. Fifth edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

European Regional Development Fund and Cohesion Fund 2021-2027

16-01-2019

In the context of the upcoming Multiannual Financial Framework for 2021-2027, the European Commission published a proposal for a regulation on the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) and the Cohesion Fund (CF) on 29 May 2018. The new single regulation on the ERDF and CF (previously covered by two separate regulations) identifies the specific objectives and scope of support for both funds, including non-eligible activities. The majority of ERDF funding (65 % to 85 %) will focus on smart growth ...

In the context of the upcoming Multiannual Financial Framework for 2021-2027, the European Commission published a proposal for a regulation on the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) and the Cohesion Fund (CF) on 29 May 2018. The new single regulation on the ERDF and CF (previously covered by two separate regulations) identifies the specific objectives and scope of support for both funds, including non-eligible activities. The majority of ERDF funding (65 % to 85 %) will focus on smart growth and the green economy, while the fund will also support other activities such as connectivity, social issues and local development. The CF will continue to focus predominantly on environmental and transport infrastructure. Special provisions have been proposed for territories such as urban areas and outermost regions. The indicator framework for monitoring progress will include new common results indicators. At the European Parliament, the file has been allocated to the Committee on Regional Development, where the rapporteur's draft report was presented in October 2018. It is planned to be voted in committee in February 2019. Second edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

European Maritime and Fisheries Fund 2021-2027

16-01-2019

As part of the next EU budget framework for the 2021-2027 period, the European Commission published its proposal for a regulation on the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF) on 12 June 2018. The new fund will continue to support the EU common fisheries policy and the Union's maritime policy. The proposal aims to simplify the delivery of the fund compared to the very complex legal framework in use for the current EMFF. It therefore presents a more flexible architecture: this would allow Member ...

As part of the next EU budget framework for the 2021-2027 period, the European Commission published its proposal for a regulation on the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF) on 12 June 2018. The new fund will continue to support the EU common fisheries policy and the Union's maritime policy. The proposal aims to simplify the delivery of the fund compared to the very complex legal framework in use for the current EMFF. It therefore presents a more flexible architecture: this would allow Member States to use the funds where they see the greatest need, instead of being bound to a list of pre-defined measures and eligibility rules. Small-scale coastal fisheries and outermost regions would receive an increased preferential treatment. It further proposes increased support for international ocean governance and stronger synergies with other EU policies. The fund is also expected to contribute to the development of the blue economy and support the EU's climate objectives. In the Parliament, the Committee on Fisheries is expected to vote on the draft report and the tabled amendments in February 2019. Second edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Research for PECH Committee - Implementation and impact of key European Maritime and Fisheries Fund measures (EMFF) on the Common Fisheries Policy, and the post-2020 EMFF proposal

15-01-2019

This Report is a research on the current performance of the shared management component of the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF) and its impact on the Common Fisheries Policy. Based on quantitative data collection as well as on interviews with Managing Authorities of Member States and stakeholders, the Report also analyses the legislative proposal for the post-2020 EMFF and seeks to support the Members of the PECH Committee of the EU Parliament in their consideration.

This Report is a research on the current performance of the shared management component of the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF) and its impact on the Common Fisheries Policy. Based on quantitative data collection as well as on interviews with Managing Authorities of Member States and stakeholders, the Report also analyses the legislative proposal for the post-2020 EMFF and seeks to support the Members of the PECH Committee of the EU Parliament in their consideration.

Awtur estern

CETMAR, Spain: Marta Ballesteros, Rosa Chapela, Jose L. Santiago, Mariola Norte-Navarro - COGEA, Italy: Anna Kęsicka, Alessandro Pititto, Ugo Abbagnano, Giuseppe Scordella

Data tal-pubblikazzjoni: 15-01-2019

Promoting renewable energy sources in the EU after 2020

15-01-2019

In November 2016, the European Commission launched the Clean Energy package, including a recast of the Directive on the promotion of renewable energy sources (‘RES Directive’), with the objective of greatly increasing the share of RES in final energy consumption by 2030. The revised RES Directive aims to provide guiding principles on financial support schemes for RES, renewable energy self-consumption, energy communities and district heating. It seeks to enhance mechanisms for cross-border cooperation ...

In November 2016, the European Commission launched the Clean Energy package, including a recast of the Directive on the promotion of renewable energy sources (‘RES Directive’), with the objective of greatly increasing the share of RES in final energy consumption by 2030. The revised RES Directive aims to provide guiding principles on financial support schemes for RES, renewable energy self-consumption, energy communities and district heating. It seeks to enhance mechanisms for cross-border cooperation, simplify administrative processes, strengthen the sustainability and greenhouse gas emissions-savings criteria for biofuels, and mainstream the use of RES in the transport sector and in the heating and cooling sector. Trilogue negotiations started in February 2018 and resulted in a provisional agreement on 14 June 2018. The final text was formally adopted by Parliament (13 November 2018) and Council (4 December 2018), published in the Official Journal on 21 December 2018 and entered into force three days later. Fifth edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. Please note this document has been designed for on-line viewing.

Child labour: A priority for EU human rights action

15-01-2019

Despite a comprehensive normative international framework that prohibits child labour, it persists in many areas of the world, particularly in developing countries. In sub-Saharan-Africa, it has even increased in recent years. More efforts are therefore needed to combat child labour. However, not all work performed by children is harmful to their health and development. The first task is therefore to distinguish child labour – which entails harmful forms of work – from other forms of children's involvement ...

Despite a comprehensive normative international framework that prohibits child labour, it persists in many areas of the world, particularly in developing countries. In sub-Saharan-Africa, it has even increased in recent years. More efforts are therefore needed to combat child labour. However, not all work performed by children is harmful to their health and development. The first task is therefore to distinguish child labour – which entails harmful forms of work – from other forms of children's involvement with work that are acceptable and have an educational component. While international conventions provide a broad definition of child labour, they leave the task of defining more precise criteria, such as the acceptable number of working hours per week or what constitutes hazardous work, to national legislation. Child labour is a complex phenomenon that has a multiplicity of causes, among which poverty usually features first. It requires a comprehensive approach to fight it, including awareness-raising among families and local communities, due diligence by companies involved in global supply chains, and action by governments, international organisations and civil society. The European Union protects children's rights through both its internal and external policies. It has deployed measures to fight child labour through cooperation with international organisations and has funded development projects whose aim is to counter it. The human rights conditionality enshrined in the EU's trade arrangements provides another path for tackling child labour. Nevertheless, there are numerous calls from civil society and the European Parliament to impose binding legal obligations on EU-based companies, to make sure their imports of goods from developing countries are free of child labour.

Research for CULT Committee – Film Financing and the Digital Single Market: its Future, the Role of Territoriality and New Models of Financing

15-01-2019

This report studies the role of territoriality in film financing, the legal and market challenges territoriality faces as a key model for film financing and the consequences if EU policies were to reduce or mitigate the scope of territorial exclusivity in the audiovisual sector. It provides information on Member States’ and EU models of film financing, explores the challenges film financing faces from digital developments and evolving consumer behaviour and analyses possible alternatives to traditional ...

This report studies the role of territoriality in film financing, the legal and market challenges territoriality faces as a key model for film financing and the consequences if EU policies were to reduce or mitigate the scope of territorial exclusivity in the audiovisual sector. It provides information on Member States’ and EU models of film financing, explores the challenges film financing faces from digital developments and evolving consumer behaviour and analyses possible alternatives to traditional methods of financing and policies to support this.

Awtur estern

Institute for Information Law (IViR): Joost POORT, P. Bernt HUGENHOLTZ, Peter LINDHOUT, Gijs van TIL

Data tal-pubblikazzjoni: 14-01-2019

A new European agenda for culture

14-01-2019

Culture can have various meanings and roles in our lives and societies. Continuous research into this subject reveals its significant contribution not only to economic growth and job creation but also to wellbeing, social cohesion and a sense of belonging. Together with culture's importance in shaping and maintaining international relations, these aspects define Europe's cultural strategy for the future.

Culture can have various meanings and roles in our lives and societies. Continuous research into this subject reveals its significant contribution not only to economic growth and job creation but also to wellbeing, social cohesion and a sense of belonging. Together with culture's importance in shaping and maintaining international relations, these aspects define Europe's cultural strategy for the future.

Avvenimenti fil-ġejjieni

22-01-2019
Harmonisation as a principle for Single Market legislation
Smigħ -
IMCO
23-01-2019
Implementation of EU Funds aimed at fighting violence against women & girls – Hearing
Smigħ -
FEMM
23-01-2019
Role and impact of the European Parliament in the 2014-19 legislative term
Avveniment ieħor -
EPRS

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