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EU policies – Delivering for citizens: Energy supply and security

28-06-2019

Energy policy is a competence shared between the EU and its Member States. Whereas the EU has responsibility under the Treaties to ensure security of supply, Member States are responsible for determining the structure of their energy supply and their choice of energy sources. EU legislation on security of supply focuses on natural gas and electricity markets, and is closely related to other EU objectives: consolidating a single energy market, improving energy efficiency, and promoting renewable energy ...

Energy policy is a competence shared between the EU and its Member States. Whereas the EU has responsibility under the Treaties to ensure security of supply, Member States are responsible for determining the structure of their energy supply and their choice of energy sources. EU legislation on security of supply focuses on natural gas and electricity markets, and is closely related to other EU objectives: consolidating a single energy market, improving energy efficiency, and promoting renewable energy sources to decarbonise the economy and meet the Paris Agreement goals. The 2014-2019 legislature saw numerous initiatives in connection with security of supply. The EU institutions reached agreement on a revised regulation on security of gas supply, a revised regulation on security of electricity supply, a revised decision on intergovernmental agreements in the energy field, a targeted revision of the gas directive to apply its key provisions to pipelines with third countries, and also new targets for energy efficiency and renewables by 2030. Parliament also adopted several own-initiative resolutions in the energy field, including one on the new EU strategy on liquefied natural gas and gas storage, which is key to gas supply security. Meanwhile, EU projects of common interest (PCIs) finance energy infrastructure that improves interconnection and supports security of supply. There is growing expectation among EU citizens that the EU will step up its involvement in energy supply and security. Whereas this view was shared by just over half of EU citizens in 2016 (52 %), it is now expressed by roughly two thirds (65 %). The EU will retain a key role in monitoring security of supply throughout the energy transition from the old system of centralised generation dominated by fossil fuels in national markets, towards a new system characterised by a high share of renewables, more localised production and cross-border markets. However, the EU would need to use a special legislative procedure if it wanted to intervene directly in determining the energy supply of its Member States. This procedure requires decision-making by unanimity in Council and only a consultative role for the Parliament. This is an update of an earlier briefing issued in advance of the 2019 European elections.

New EU rules on labelling of tyres

21-03-2019

On 17 May 2018, the European Commission adopted a proposal for a new regulation on the labelling of tyres for the purposes of fuel efficiency, safety, and noise reduction. This would replace the 2009 Tyre Labelling Regulation (TLR), while maintaining and reinforcing most of its key provisions. The proposed regulation would increase consumer awareness of the tyre label and improve market surveillance and enforcement of TLR provisions across the EU Member States. Suppliers would be obliged to display ...

On 17 May 2018, the European Commission adopted a proposal for a new regulation on the labelling of tyres for the purposes of fuel efficiency, safety, and noise reduction. This would replace the 2009 Tyre Labelling Regulation (TLR), while maintaining and reinforcing most of its key provisions. The proposed regulation would increase consumer awareness of the tyre label and improve market surveillance and enforcement of TLR provisions across the EU Member States. Suppliers would be obliged to display the tyre label in all forms of purchase, including where the tyre is not physically shown in the store and where it is sold online or on a long-distance basis. Whereas the tyre label is currently applicable to passenger and light-duty vehicles, in future it would also apply to heavy-duty vehicles. The new label would include visual information on tyre performance in snow or ice conditions, and could be adjusted by means of delegated acts to include information on mileage, abrasion or re-studded tyres. From 2020, all tyre labels would be included in the product registration database being set up as part of the revised EU framework for energy efficiency labelling. Whereas the Council finalised its position on 4 March 2019, the Parliament is expected to vote on its first-reading position, on the basis of the ITRE committee’s report, during the March II plenary session.

Revised Energy Efficiency Directive

16-01-2019

On 30 November 2016, the European Commission presented a proposal for a revised Energy Efficiency Directive, as part of the Clean Energy package. This aims to adapt and align EU energy legislation with the 2030 energy and climate goals, and contribute towards delivering the energy union strategy. The Commission initially proposed a 30 % binding EU energy efficiency target for 2030, to be achieved by means of indicative national targets and the extension beyond 2020 of the energy savings obligation ...

On 30 November 2016, the European Commission presented a proposal for a revised Energy Efficiency Directive, as part of the Clean Energy package. This aims to adapt and align EU energy legislation with the 2030 energy and climate goals, and contribute towards delivering the energy union strategy. The Commission initially proposed a 30 % binding EU energy efficiency target for 2030, to be achieved by means of indicative national targets and the extension beyond 2020 of the energy savings obligation scheme, which currently requires utility companies to help their consumers use 1.5 % less energy each year. The Commission proposal also aims to make the rules on energy metering and billing clearer for consumers. Trilogue negotiations started in February 2018 and resulted in a provisional agreement among the EU Institutions on 19 June 2018. The final text was formally adopted by Parliament (13 November 2018) and Council (4 December 2018). It was published in the Official Journal on 21 December 2018 and entered into force three days later. Member States are required to transpose most of the revised directive by 25 June 2020, although the provisions on metering and billing can be transposed by 25 October 2020. Fifth edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Promoting renewable energy sources in the EU after 2020

15-01-2019

In November 2016, the European Commission launched the Clean Energy package, including a recast of the Directive on the promotion of renewable energy sources (‘RES Directive’), with the objective of greatly increasing the share of RES in final energy consumption by 2030. The revised RES Directive aims to provide guiding principles on financial support schemes for RES, renewable energy self-consumption, energy communities and district heating. It seeks to enhance mechanisms for cross-border cooperation ...

In November 2016, the European Commission launched the Clean Energy package, including a recast of the Directive on the promotion of renewable energy sources (‘RES Directive’), with the objective of greatly increasing the share of RES in final energy consumption by 2030. The revised RES Directive aims to provide guiding principles on financial support schemes for RES, renewable energy self-consumption, energy communities and district heating. It seeks to enhance mechanisms for cross-border cooperation, simplify administrative processes, strengthen the sustainability and greenhouse gas emissions-savings criteria for biofuels, and mainstream the use of RES in the transport sector and in the heating and cooling sector. Trilogue negotiations started in February 2018 and resulted in a provisional agreement on 14 June 2018. The final text was formally adopted by Parliament (13 November 2018) and Council (4 December 2018), published in the Official Journal on 21 December 2018 and entered into force three days later. Fifth edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. Please note this document has been designed for on-line viewing.

EMAS in the European Parliament: A quiet success story

19-12-2018

The European Union (EU) Eco-Management and Audit Scheme (EMAS) is a voluntary management instrument for companies and other organisations wanting to evaluate, report and continuously improve their environmental performance. In order to register with EMAS, organisations must meet the requirements of the EU EMAS Regulation – (EC) No 1221/2009 – and the ISO 14001:2015 standards. In 2007, as part of its commitment to making a long-term contribution to sustainable development, the European Parliament ...

The European Union (EU) Eco-Management and Audit Scheme (EMAS) is a voluntary management instrument for companies and other organisations wanting to evaluate, report and continuously improve their environmental performance. In order to register with EMAS, organisations must meet the requirements of the EU EMAS Regulation – (EC) No 1221/2009 – and the ISO 14001:2015 standards. In 2007, as part of its commitment to making a long-term contribution to sustainable development, the European Parliament became one of the few EU institutions and the first parliament in the EU to obtain EMAS certification. Through its environmental management system it is able to track progress with regard to reducing carbon dioxide emissions and waste, promoting the efficient use of energy, water and paper, incorporating environmental guidelines into procurement procedures, and raising awareness of environmentally friendly behaviour among its staff and Members. This document details the Parliament's progress to date in meeting its targets in all of the above-mentioned areas, and maps out its ambitions for the future.

Awtur estern

This document has been compiled and edited by Desislava Boyadjieva, with graphics by Nadejda Kresnichka-Nikolchova, Publications Management and Editorial Unit, EPRS, on behalf of the EMAS Unit, a Central Service attached to the Secretary-General of the European Parliament.

Setting CO2 emission performance standards for new heavy-duty vehicles

13-09-2018

This initial appraisal assesses the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission's impact assessment accompanying its proposal for a regulation setting CO2 emission performance standards for some categories of new 'rigid lorries' and 'tractors'. The proposal seeks to contribute to achieving the climate target set by the Paris Agreement, adopted on 12 December 2015, i.e. 'holding the increase in the global average temperature to well below 2 °C above pre-industrial levels and pursuing efforts ...

This initial appraisal assesses the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission's impact assessment accompanying its proposal for a regulation setting CO2 emission performance standards for some categories of new 'rigid lorries' and 'tractors'. The proposal seeks to contribute to achieving the climate target set by the Paris Agreement, adopted on 12 December 2015, i.e. 'holding the increase in the global average temperature to well below 2 °C above pre-industrial levels and pursuing efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5 °C above pre-industrial levels'. In addition, it intends to help Member States achieving the national greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction targets in the road transport sector for the period 2021-2030 set by the 'effort sharing' regulation proposed by the Commission. The appraisal concludes that the impact assessment clearly defines the problems to be addressed, although in a couple of cases only one option is considered (in addition to the baseline). In such cases, the Commission's approach appears not to be entirely in line with the better regulation toolbox. The analysis carried out appears to be sound and well evidenced, providing ample and detailed insight into the issues considered. The analysis of impacts focuses on the economic and environmental dimension, consistently with the manner in which the problems have been defined. Their quantitative assessment is based on three models which, according to the IA, have already been 'successfully' used in previous impact assessment regarding transport, energy and climate policies, The IA appears to have addressed all of the Regulatory Scrutiny Board's recommendations, and the legislative proposal seems to be consistent with the analysis carried out in the IA.

Improving energy performance of buildings

19-07-2018

On 30 November 2016, the European Commission adopted a ‘clean energy’ package to help the EU meet its 2030 energy and climate goals, including a targeted revision of the 2010 Directive on the energy performance of buildings (EPBD). The Commission proposed to leave intact the main features of the existing EPBD, modernise and streamline some requirements, introduce binding obligations on electro-mobility requirements in buildings, introduce a ‘smartness indicator’ that assesses the technological capability ...

On 30 November 2016, the European Commission adopted a ‘clean energy’ package to help the EU meet its 2030 energy and climate goals, including a targeted revision of the 2010 Directive on the energy performance of buildings (EPBD). The Commission proposed to leave intact the main features of the existing EPBD, modernise and streamline some requirements, introduce binding obligations on electro-mobility requirements in buildings, introduce a ‘smartness indicator’ that assesses the technological capability of buildings in energy self-production and consumption, and set clearer requirements for national databases on energy performance certificates. The Council adopted a general approach in June 2017. In Parliament the ITRE committee adopted its report in October 2017. After three rounds of trilogue negotiations, a provisional agreement was reached on 19 December 2017. After formal adoption by Parliament and Council in spring 2018, the revised EPBD was signed into law on 30 May 2018 and entered into force on 9 July 2018. Fourth edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. Please note this document has been designed for on-line viewing.

Cities: Front line of climate action

16-02-2018

Cities have a crucial role to play in addressing the climate change challenge and delivering on the ambitions of the Paris Agreement. In the European Union (EU), where nearly three quarters of the population live in urban areas, many cities are leading the way in this regard, taking action in three areas central to increasing energy efficiency and reducing emissions – namely, buildings, energy supply, and transport – and acting as living laboratories of climate-change-related innovation. The EU supports ...

Cities have a crucial role to play in addressing the climate change challenge and delivering on the ambitions of the Paris Agreement. In the European Union (EU), where nearly three quarters of the population live in urban areas, many cities are leading the way in this regard, taking action in three areas central to increasing energy efficiency and reducing emissions – namely, buildings, energy supply, and transport – and acting as living laboratories of climate-change-related innovation. The EU supports cities in their efforts by providing guidance, promoting experience-and knowledge-sharing, fostering cooperation, and funding climate action. Climate-relevant initiatives are in place in various policy fields, from transport to the environment, research and innovation, the most high-profile being the Covenant of Mayors for Climate and Energy, which currently counts over 7 700 signatories. A supportive framework is essential to ensure city-level initiatives have enough resources and potential to effect meaningful change. Easing access to climate funding and strengthening the role of cities in climate governance are among the main challenges ahead, and the main demands of city associations. The latter issue is currently in the spotlight, notably in relation to the proposal for a regulation on energy union governance, part of the EU clean energy package. The European Parliament adopted amendments to the proposed regulation in January 2018. The role of EU regions and cities in implementing the Paris Agreement is also the subject of an own-initiative report, scheduled for debate during the March plenary session. This briefing is an update of an earlier one published in October 2017.

Effiċjenza enerġetika

01-02-2018

It-tnaqqis fil-konsum u fil-ħela tal-enerġija huwa ta' importanza dejjem ikbar għall-UE. Fl-2007 l-mexxejja tal-UE iffissaw mira għall-2020 biex il-konsum tal-enerġija annwali tal-UE jitnaqqas b'20 %. Il-miżuri tal-effiċjenza enerġetika qed jiġu rikonoxxuti dejjem aktar mhux biss bħala mezz biex tinkiseb provvista enerġetika sostenibbli, jitnaqqsu l-emissjonijiet ta' gassijiet serra, tissaħħaħ is-sigurtà tal-provvista u titnaqqas in-nefqa tal-importazzjoni, iżda wkoll biex tkun promossa l-kompetittività ...

It-tnaqqis fil-konsum u fil-ħela tal-enerġija huwa ta' importanza dejjem ikbar għall-UE. Fl-2007 l-mexxejja tal-UE iffissaw mira għall-2020 biex il-konsum tal-enerġija annwali tal-UE jitnaqqas b'20 %. Il-miżuri tal-effiċjenza enerġetika qed jiġu rikonoxxuti dejjem aktar mhux biss bħala mezz biex tinkiseb provvista enerġetika sostenibbli, jitnaqqsu l-emissjonijiet ta' gassijiet serra, tissaħħaħ is-sigurtà tal-provvista u titnaqqas in-nefqa tal-importazzjoni, iżda wkoll biex tkun promossa l-kompetittività tal-UE. Għaldaqstant, l-effiċjenza enerġetika hija prijorità strateġika għall-Unjoni tal-Enerġija, u l-UE tippromwovi l-prinċipju li "l-effiċjenza fl-enerġija tiġi l-ewwel". Il-qafas ta' politika futura għall-perjodu wara l-2030 qed jiġi diskuss.

Clean energy in the European Union

11-01-2018

In November 2016, the Commission adopted the clean energy package, of eight legislative proposals on energy efficiency, renewables, electricity markets and governance. During the January plenary session, Parliament will vote on three reports relating to the package: a revised energy efficiency directive, a recast directive on the promotion of renewable energy sources, and a new regulation on governance of the energy union. The aim is to gain a mandate for trilogue negotiations on all three.

In November 2016, the Commission adopted the clean energy package, of eight legislative proposals on energy efficiency, renewables, electricity markets and governance. During the January plenary session, Parliament will vote on three reports relating to the package: a revised energy efficiency directive, a recast directive on the promotion of renewable energy sources, and a new regulation on governance of the energy union. The aim is to gain a mandate for trilogue negotiations on all three.

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