35

Riżultat(i)

Kelma (kelmiet)
Tip ta' pubblikazzjoni
Qasam tematiku
Awtur
Kelma għat-tiftix
Data

World Energy Outlook 2016

19-12-2016

World Energy Outlook 2016 World Energy Outlook (WEO) is an annual study produced by the International Energy Agency (IEA), which models future global trends in energy based on different policy scenarios. The study looks at how production and consumption of different energy sources is evolving, and considers the likely effects of investment decisions, new technologies, government policies and international agreements. The WEO sheds light on the expected energy trajectory of different regions of the ...

World Energy Outlook 2016 World Energy Outlook (WEO) is an annual study produced by the International Energy Agency (IEA), which models future global trends in energy based on different policy scenarios. The study looks at how production and consumption of different energy sources is evolving, and considers the likely effects of investment decisions, new technologies, government policies and international agreements. The WEO sheds light on the expected energy trajectory of different regions of the world.

Ethical Aspects of Cyber-Physical Systems

28-06-2016

Cyber-physical systems (CPS) are intelligent robotics systems, linked with the Internet of Things, or technical systems of networked computers, robots and artificial intelligence that interact with the physical world.The project 'Ethical aspects of CPS' aims to provide insights into the potential ethical concerns and related unintended impacts of the possible evolution of CPS technology by 2050. The overarching purpose is to support the European Parliament, the parliamentary bodies, and the individual ...

Cyber-physical systems (CPS) are intelligent robotics systems, linked with the Internet of Things, or technical systems of networked computers, robots and artificial intelligence that interact with the physical world.The project 'Ethical aspects of CPS' aims to provide insights into the potential ethical concerns and related unintended impacts of the possible evolution of CPS technology by 2050. The overarching purpose is to support the European Parliament, the parliamentary bodies, and the individual Members in their anticipation of possible future concerns regarding developments in CPS, robotics and artificial intelligence.The Scientific Foresight study was conducted in three phases:1. A 'technical horizon scan', in the form of briefing papers describing the technical trends and their possible societal, ethical, economic, environmental, political/legal and demographic impacts, and this in seven application domains. 2. The 'soft impact and scenario phase', which analysed soft impacts of CPS, on the basis of the technical horizon scan, for pointing out possible future public concerns via an envisioning exercise and using exploratory scenarios.3. The 'legal backcasting' phase, which resulted in a briefing for the European Parliament identifying the legal instruments that may need to be modified or reviewed, including — where appropriate — areas identified for anticipatory parliamentary work, in accordance with the conclusions reached within the project.The outcome of the study is a policy briefing for MEPs describing legal instruments to anticipate impacts of future developments in the area of cyber-physical systems, such as intelligent robotics systems, linked with the Internet of Things. It is important to note that not all impacts of CPS are easily translated into legislation, as it is often contested whether they are in effect harmful, who is to be held accountable, and to what extent these impacts constitute a public rather than a private concern.

Promotion of renewable energy sources in the EU: EU policies and Member State approaches

07-06-2016

This paper analyses the development of renewable energy sources (RES) in the EU, with a focus on support mechanisms at the EU and Member State level, including current and upcoming reforms. It presents the principal support mechanisms for RES, as well as developments in selected Member States, outlines the main technical and regulatory challenges associated with an increasing share of renewable energy and highlights the involvement and positions of the European Parliament. The development of renewable ...

This paper analyses the development of renewable energy sources (RES) in the EU, with a focus on support mechanisms at the EU and Member State level, including current and upcoming reforms. It presents the principal support mechanisms for RES, as well as developments in selected Member States, outlines the main technical and regulatory challenges associated with an increasing share of renewable energy and highlights the involvement and positions of the European Parliament. The development of renewable energy sources (RES) is a priority for the European Union. One of the goals of the EU Energy Union strategy is making the EU the world leader in renewable energies. The Renewable Energy Directive sets national targets for all Member States, which remain free to decide how they support RES within the EU energy market rules. The Commission plans to revise the Renewable Energy Directive and other RES-related legislation in 2016. Renewables have a growing share in energy consumption in the EU. However, RES investments in Europe have fallen in recent years due to regulatory changes, economic slowdown and falling technology costs. The development of RES poses a number of technical and regulatory challenges, notably their integration into electricity grids and the sustainability of biofuels, and requires a market design that encourages investment while keeping costs under control. The European Parliament supports the growth of RES in the EU and has called for more ambitious targets. Parliament's Committee on Industry, Research and Energy is currently working on own-initiative reports on energy market design and on the renewable energy progress report.

Post-2020 reform of the EU Emissions Trading System

18-09-2015

In July 2015, the European Commission proposed a reform of the EU Emissions Trading System (ETS) for the period 2021-30, following the guidance set by the October 2014 European Council. The proposed directive introduces a new limit on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the ETS sector to achieve the EU climate targets for 2030, new rules for addressing carbon leakage, and provisions for funding innovation and modernisation in the energy sector. It encourages Member States to compensate for indirect ...

In July 2015, the European Commission proposed a reform of the EU Emissions Trading System (ETS) for the period 2021-30, following the guidance set by the October 2014 European Council. The proposed directive introduces a new limit on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the ETS sector to achieve the EU climate targets for 2030, new rules for addressing carbon leakage, and provisions for funding innovation and modernisation in the energy sector. It encourages Member States to compensate for indirect carbon costs. In combination with the Market Stability Reserve agreed in May 2015, the proposed reform sets out the EU ETS rules for the period up to 2030, giving greater certainty to industry and to investors. The Commission proposal has been transmitted to the Council and Parliament, as well as the advisory committees. Initial stakeholder reactions have focussed on the carbon leakage provisions and the arrangements for compensating indirect costs. A more recent edition of this document is available. Find it by searching by the document title at this address: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/thinktank/en/home.html

Biomass for electricity and heating: Opportunities and challenges

17-09-2015

Biomass is a renewable energy source which can be used to produce electricity, heat and transport fuels. It accounts for roughly two thirds of renewable energy in the European Union (EU). Although biomass can come from many different sources, wood is by far the most common. Under EU legislation, biomass is carbon neutral, based on the assumption that the carbon released when solid biomass is burned will be re-absorbed during tree growth. Current EU policies provide incentives to use biomass for power ...

Biomass is a renewable energy source which can be used to produce electricity, heat and transport fuels. It accounts for roughly two thirds of renewable energy in the European Union (EU). Although biomass can come from many different sources, wood is by far the most common. Under EU legislation, biomass is carbon neutral, based on the assumption that the carbon released when solid biomass is burned will be re-absorbed during tree growth. Current EU policies provide incentives to use biomass for power generation. At present, there are no binding sustainability criteria for biomass at EU level, although some exist at national and industry level. Opportunities and challenges related to biomass have to do with greenhouse gas emissions (biomass can contribute to reducing carbon emissions, but emissions may not be fully accounted for); resource availability (biomass can contribute to energy security, but its sources are finite); environment and human health (increased use of biomass for energy can have adverse effects on air quality, soil properties and biodiversity). To address sustainability concerns, different responses have been put forward, including the principle of the cascading use of biomass, whereby it is used more than once, with energy conversion typically as the last step. The European Parliament has called for EU sustainability criteria but has opposed legally binding rules for prioritising uses of wood. Stakeholders have expressed opinions on greenhouse-gas accounting, sustainability criteria and the cascading use of biomass.

China's shift to clean energies

05-05-2015

The Chinese government’s significant policy and financial support for the renewable energy sector confirmed China's world leadership in total installed renewable power capacity in 2013. For the first time China’s new renewable power capacity exceeded its new fossil fuel and nuclear capacity. In 2013, China attracted more green investment than the EU28. With the rebalancing of its overall economy from an export-led to a more consumption-based growth model, the Chinese renewable energy sector is redirecting ...

The Chinese government’s significant policy and financial support for the renewable energy sector confirmed China's world leadership in total installed renewable power capacity in 2013. For the first time China’s new renewable power capacity exceeded its new fossil fuel and nuclear capacity. In 2013, China attracted more green investment than the EU28. With the rebalancing of its overall economy from an export-led to a more consumption-based growth model, the Chinese renewable energy sector is redirecting its focus from exports towards greater domestic use. The adoption of the Renewable Energy Law (REL) in 2005 was an important turning point in China’s evolving renewable energy policy. China’s first regulatory framework for clean energy promotion laid the foundation for the provision of systematic support to the development of renewable energies. The 11th Five-Year Plan (2006-10) introduced a 10% target for non-fossil energy as a portion of total energy consumption for the first time. The 12th Five-Year Plan (2011-15) includes a non-fossil energy target of 11.4% and, more importantly, defines seven strategic emerging industries (SEIs) set to foster green growth and China’s worldwide leadership in these sectors. Despite this remarkably positive trend, the share of renewable energy in China’s energy mix remains low, as growth in fossil fuel use continues to spur the country’s plans for a high annual growth rate of about 7%. In 2011, fossil fuels and nuclear energy together still accounted for almost 93% of primary energy consumption, while renewable energies represented only around 7%. Although domestic deployment of renewable technologies is gaining momentum, over-capacity in the Chinese solar and wind industries, coupled with the slowdown in renewable energy investment in the EU and US, is pushing Chinese companies to venture into new markets.

Biofuels policy and indirect land use change

20-04-2015

The EU has been supporting biofuels, mainly as a way to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in road transport. However, the current policy has been criticised by many, including the European Parliament, for failing to take into account emissions from indirect land use change. To address these shortcomings, the Commission presented a legislative proposal in October 2012. Second reading negotiations with the Council have delivered a compromise, now awaiting a vote in plenary.

The EU has been supporting biofuels, mainly as a way to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in road transport. However, the current policy has been criticised by many, including the European Parliament, for failing to take into account emissions from indirect land use change. To address these shortcomings, the Commission presented a legislative proposal in October 2012. Second reading negotiations with the Council have delivered a compromise, now awaiting a vote in plenary.

The Impact of Biofuels on Transport and the Environment, and their Connection with Agricultural Development in Europe

16-02-2015

The use of biofuels in transport is being promoted as a means of tackling climate change, diversifying energy sources and securing energy supply. Biofuels production also provides new options for using agricultural crops. However, it also gives rise to environmental, social and economic concerns which are the subject of intense debate worldwide. This study provides a detailed overview of biofuels production and consumption and of related policies worldwide. It also contains comprehensive analysis ...

The use of biofuels in transport is being promoted as a means of tackling climate change, diversifying energy sources and securing energy supply. Biofuels production also provides new options for using agricultural crops. However, it also gives rise to environmental, social and economic concerns which are the subject of intense debate worldwide. This study provides a detailed overview of biofuels production and consumption and of related policies worldwide. It also contains comprehensive analysis and discussion of key aspects affecting the overall sustainability of biofuels. These include, in particular, their impact on agricultural markets, emissions from indirect land-use change, and greenhouse gas emissions.

Awtur estern

Luisa Marelli, Monica Padella, Robert Edwards, Alberto Moro, Marina Kousoulidou, Jacopo Giuntoli, David Baxter, Veljko Vorkapic, Alessandro Agostini, Adrian O’Connell, Laura Lonza and Lilian Garcia-Lledo (European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy and Transport, Sustainable Transport Unit)

ENVI Relevant Legislative Areas of the EU-US Trade and Investment Partnership Negotiations (TTIP)

05-02-2015

In February 2013, the European Union (EU) and the United States of America (US) started the procedures necessary for initiating formal negotiations on a free trade agreement, referred to as the “Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership” (TTIP). The first round of negotiations took place in Washington D.C. in July 2013, the seventh round ended on 3 October 2014 and the eight round is taking place in Brussels from 2 to 6 February 2015. In order to monitor the on-going negotiations, the Committee ...

In February 2013, the European Union (EU) and the United States of America (US) started the procedures necessary for initiating formal negotiations on a free trade agreement, referred to as the “Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership” (TTIP). The first round of negotiations took place in Washington D.C. in July 2013, the seventh round ended on 3 October 2014 and the eight round is taking place in Brussels from 2 to 6 February 2015. In order to monitor the on-going negotiations, the Committee on Environment, Public Health and Food Safety (ENVI) commissioned a study on "ENVI Relevant Legislative Areas of the EU-US Trade and Investment Partnership Negotiations (TTIP)". The study complemented a 2013 study on “Legal Implications of TTIP for the Acquis Communautaire in ENVI Relevant Sectors” for the ENVI Committee. This leaflet presents the key findings of the 2014 study.

TTIP Impacts on European Energy Markets and Manufacturing Industries

12-01-2015

This study, provided by the Policy Department A at the request of the Industry, Research and Energy Committee (ITRE), aims to assess whether and to which extent European energy markets and manufacturing industries would be affected by the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP). Although the negotiations are currenly on-going, the analysis shows that the TTIP will improve the EU’s security of energy supply through adding liquidity and competition to the natural gas market. The TTIP ...

This study, provided by the Policy Department A at the request of the Industry, Research and Energy Committee (ITRE), aims to assess whether and to which extent European energy markets and manufacturing industries would be affected by the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP). Although the negotiations are currenly on-going, the analysis shows that the TTIP will improve the EU’s security of energy supply through adding liquidity and competition to the natural gas market. The TTIP will not directly lower either environmental or social legislation, but the study recommends the ITRE Committee to be aware of the potential for weakening of legislation implementation such as REACH and FQD.

Awtur estern

Koen RADEMAEKERS, Stephan SLINGERLAND, Albert BRESSAND, Gabriel FELBERMAYR and Karl TÖRNMARCK (Triple E Consulting)

Avvenimenti fil-ġejjieni

16-10-2019
State of the Union: The view from regions and cities
Avveniment ieħor -
EPRS
17-10-2019
What Europe is Thinking: The latest Pew survey of opinion in 14 EU Member States
Avveniment ieħor -
EPRS

Sħab

Żomm ruħek konness

email update imageSistema ta' aġġornamenti bl-email

Permezz tas-sistema tat-twissija bl-email, li tibgħat l-aħħar informazzjoni direttament lill-indirizz tal-email tiegħek, inti tista' ssegwi l-persuni u l-avvenimenti kollha marbuta mal-Parlament. Dan jinkludi l-aħħar aħbarijiet dwar il-membri, is-servizzi tal-informazzjoni jew il-Grupp ta' Riflessjoni.

Is-sistema hija aċċessibbli minn kullimkien fuq il-websajt tal-Parlament. Biex tabbona u tirċievi notifiki tal-Grupp ta' Riflessjoni, kulma trid huwa li tagħti l-indirizz tal-email tiegħek, li tagħżel is-suġġett li jinteressak, li tindika l-frekwenza (kuljum, kull ġimgħa jew kull xahar) u li tikkonferma r-reġistrazzjoni tiegħek billi tikklikkja fuq il-link mibgħuta bl-email.

RSS imageTrażmissjonijiet RSS

M'hemm nieqsa l-ebda informazzjoni jew aġġornament fuq il-websajt tal-Parlament Ewropew bis-saħħa tal-flussi tagħna tal-RSS.

Jekk jogħġbok ikklikkja fuq il-link t'hawn taħt sabiex jiġi kkonfigurat il-fluss RSS tiegħek.