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Safeguarding competition in air transport

20-05-2019

The issue of fair competition between EU and third-country airlines and the importance of guaranteeing a level playing field has been recognised for some years by the various EU institutions as key for the future of European aviation. The 2015 Commission communication on the aviation strategy underlined the importance and legitimacy of EU action to deal with possible unfair commercial practices in international aviation, and announced the revision of existing rules in this field. On 8 June 2017, ...

The issue of fair competition between EU and third-country airlines and the importance of guaranteeing a level playing field has been recognised for some years by the various EU institutions as key for the future of European aviation. The 2015 Commission communication on the aviation strategy underlined the importance and legitimacy of EU action to deal with possible unfair commercial practices in international aviation, and announced the revision of existing rules in this field. On 8 June 2017, the Commission adopted a legislative proposal for a regulation on safeguarding competition in air transport. The objective of the proposal is to provide effective legislation in order ‘to maintain conditions conducive to a high level of Union connectivity and to ensure fair competition with third countries’ air carriers’. Parliament and Council reached agreement on the text in November 2018. The text was formally adopted by Parliament on 14 March 2019 and by Council on 9 April. Signed on 17 April, the new regulation comes into force on 30 May 2019. Fifth edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Study in focus - Competition in Air Transport

02-05-2018

This note summarises the main points presented in the study on Competition in Air Transport.

This note summarises the main points presented in the study on Competition in Air Transport.

Competition in Air Transport

16-04-2018

Competition in the aviation sector pertains to different sets of rules, competition law on the one hand and, given the cross-border interdependencies of transport markets, international rules on the other hand. The workshop aimed to examine the current situation of competition in air transport using the proposed regulation on Safeguarding competition in air transport, repealing Regulation (EC) No 868/2004 as a practical example and starting point for the discussion. The Committee on Economic and ...

Competition in the aviation sector pertains to different sets of rules, competition law on the one hand and, given the cross-border interdependencies of transport markets, international rules on the other hand. The workshop aimed to examine the current situation of competition in air transport using the proposed regulation on Safeguarding competition in air transport, repealing Regulation (EC) No 868/2004 as a practical example and starting point for the discussion. The Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs (ECON) has prepared a legislative opinion to this dossier. This Workshop was prepared by Policy Department A at the request of the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs (ECON).

Awtur estern

Kay MITUSCH, Universit Karlsruhe, Pablo MENDES DE LEON, University Leiden and Internationa Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO)

It-trasport bl-ajru: ir-regoli tas-suq

01-02-2018

L-istabbiliment tas-Suq Uniku tal-Avjazzjoni lejn l-aħħar tad-disgħinijiet tas-seklu 20 ittrasforma b'mod radikali l-industrija tat-trasport bl-ajru u, matul l-aħħar għoxrin sena, ikkontribwixxa bil-kbir għat-tkabbir qawwi fit-trasport bl-ajru fl-Ewropa.

L-istabbiliment tas-Suq Uniku tal-Avjazzjoni lejn l-aħħar tad-disgħinijiet tas-seklu 20 ittrasforma b'mod radikali l-industrija tat-trasport bl-ajru u, matul l-aħħar għoxrin sena, ikkontribwixxa bil-kbir għat-tkabbir qawwi fit-trasport bl-ajru fl-Ewropa.

Is-sikurezza tal-avjazzjoni

01-02-2018

Ir-regoli komuni, li progressivament ġew estiżi għas-settur kollu tal-avjazzjoni, jiggarantixxu livell uniformi u għoli ta' sikurezza[1] fi ħdan is-suq intern tat-trasport bl-ajru.

Ir-regoli komuni, li progressivament ġew estiżi għas-settur kollu tal-avjazzjoni, jiggarantixxu livell uniformi u għoli ta' sikurezza[1] fi ħdan is-suq intern tat-trasport bl-ajru.

Employment and working conditions in EU civil aviation

15-04-2016

Aviation is a strategically important sector of the EU economy, contributing €110 billion directly and €300 billion indirectly to EU GDP, and employing around 1.9 million persons directly. If impacts on other industries such as tourism are taken into account, then it can be said that aviation supports up to 9 million jobs. These jobs are not evenly spread across the EU: three quarters of air transport employment is centred in Germany, France, the United Kingdom, Spain, Italy and the Netherlands. ...

Aviation is a strategically important sector of the EU economy, contributing €110 billion directly and €300 billion indirectly to EU GDP, and employing around 1.9 million persons directly. If impacts on other industries such as tourism are taken into account, then it can be said that aviation supports up to 9 million jobs. These jobs are not evenly spread across the EU: three quarters of air transport employment is centred in Germany, France, the United Kingdom, Spain, Italy and the Netherlands. Since the EU liberalised the aviation market in the early 1990s, the industry has gone through notable changes which have also had an impact on employment and working conditions. For instance, outsourcing has increased; some workers have had to operate from airline bases where they do not live; income has become more variable; many have been laid off and those remaining in work have had to increase their productivity. Furthermore, next to full-time permanent contracts, atypical forms of employment such as agency work, self-employment, zero-hour contracts and pay-to-fly schemes have increasingly been used, especially for younger staff and new entrants to the workforce. Persons employed under such schemes often have more precarious working conditions and are generally less likely to be unionised. EU institutions have repeatedly examined working conditions in civil aviation. Some Members of the European Parliament, as well as of the European Economic and Social Committee, have expressed concerns about the use of atypical forms of employment and multiplication of airlines' home bases. Although the aviation strategy that the European Commission published at the end of 2015 deals with working conditions, it did not present any new legislative initiative on this issue.

European Globalisation Adjustment Fund

01-10-2015

In October, the European Parliament is due to vote in plenary session on three applications for assistance from the European Globalisation Adjustment Fund (EGF). The EGF provides one-off support to workers losing their jobs as a result of major structural changes in world trade patterns or the global financial and economic crisis.

In October, the European Parliament is due to vote in plenary session on three applications for assistance from the European Globalisation Adjustment Fund (EGF). The EGF provides one-off support to workers losing their jobs as a result of major structural changes in world trade patterns or the global financial and economic crisis.

Strengthening air passenger rights in the EU

27-05-2015

Over recent decades, the liberalisation of air transport in the EU has brought notable benefits to air passengers, including some lower air fares and a wider choice of airlines and services. At the same time, however, increased numbers of passengers and planes travelling through bigger and more crowded airports, and fragmented air space, increase the risk of problems such as flight delays and cancellations, and lost luggage. The EU has adopted several regulations on air passenger rights, which ...

Over recent decades, the liberalisation of air transport in the EU has brought notable benefits to air passengers, including some lower air fares and a wider choice of airlines and services. At the same time, however, increased numbers of passengers and planes travelling through bigger and more crowded airports, and fragmented air space, increase the risk of problems such as flight delays and cancellations, and lost luggage. The EU has adopted several regulations on air passenger rights, which complement the relevant international conventions and recommendations, to deal with such problems. However, not all passengers are aware of, or insist on, enforcement of their rights. For their part, airlines claim to struggle with financial costs and legal uncertainty. Grey areas, gaps in the current legislation and inconsistent implementation have led to numerous cases on passenger rights coming before the Court of Justice of the EU. In 2013, to address these shortcomings and the Court's decisions, the European Commission proposed to modify the existing air passenger rights regulations. Among other provisions, it specified in greater detail certain air passenger rights, clarified key definitions, and modified certain time thresholds for compensation measures, as well as limiting the obligation for airlines to provide assistance in case of long delays. The outgoing Parliament adopted its first-reading position on the proposal in February 2014. It introduced certain new elements and rejected some provisions that, in Parliament's view, weakened air passenger rights. Although the Council has made some progress on the file, it has not agreed on a general approach for negotiations with the Parliament. Stakeholders generally welcomed the clarifications in the Commission proposal and the EP's position, although they do not support all the modifications.

Current Challenges and Future Prospects for EU Secondary Airports

15-05-2015

Around 250 European airports handle less than 5 million passengers per annum - a good one third of them less than 200,000. This analysis shows that all are affected by the changing structure of the airline industry, and that most of them are losing money. It also shows, however, that these similarities shall not mask the diversity of experience and circumstances, and the very different roles played by these airports.

Around 250 European airports handle less than 5 million passengers per annum - a good one third of them less than 200,000. This analysis shows that all are affected by the changing structure of the airline industry, and that most of them are losing money. It also shows, however, that these similarities shall not mask the diversity of experience and circumstances, and the very different roles played by these airports.

Awtur estern

John Strickland

The proposed EU passenger name records (PNR) directive: Revived in the new security context

30-04-2015

After the Paris attacks of January 2015, the fight against terrorism and the phenomenon of foreign fighters is now higher than ever on the EU agenda, with a series of new measures being discussed, and existing ones refocused. In this context, the EU Passenger Name Record (PNR) proposal is once again in the spotlight. The current proposal dates back to 2011, but was rejected by the European Parliament's LIBE Committee in April 2013. However, given the new security context, and following numerous ...

After the Paris attacks of January 2015, the fight against terrorism and the phenomenon of foreign fighters is now higher than ever on the EU agenda, with a series of new measures being discussed, and existing ones refocused. In this context, the EU Passenger Name Record (PNR) proposal is once again in the spotlight. The current proposal dates back to 2011, but was rejected by the European Parliament's LIBE Committee in April 2013. However, given the new security context, and following numerous calls from EU Member States, the European Parliament committed to work towards the finalisation of an EU PNR directive by the end of 2015. Nevertheless, not everybody is convinced by the efficacy of the proposed measure, and many stakeholders question its necessity and proportionality, whilst highlighting the different fundamental-rights risks inherent in any PNR scheme. It is also argued that legislators should take into account the impact of the recent annulment of the Data Retention Directive by the Court of Justice of the EU. Privacy and civil liberties activists warn against the measure's intrusive nature, and see it as another step on the road to a surveillance society. On the other hand, air carriers advocate swift adoption of an EU PNR directive, providing harmonised legislation at EU level, rather than a set of diverging national rules. Indeed, more and more Member States are developing PNR data-collection systems, and the European Commission has made EU funding available for this purpose.

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