Proceedings of the Workshop on "Union for the Mediterranean : The Way Forward"

07-08-2012

The Arab uprisings have changed the domestic and the regional context of the Southern Mediterranean. The EU's response to the new geopolitical landscape has been rapid and substantial at the bilateral level, through its revision of the European Neighbourhood Policy (ENP). Yet reforming the multilateral framework of its relations with the southern partners remains a real challenge. A workshop held under the auspices of European Parliament President Martin Schulz considered the most effective ways of reinvigorating the Union for the Mediterranean (UFM). The following papers represent the contributions of three scholars who participated in the workshop. Timo Behr presented four options before he argued in favour of a more pragmatic approach. Given regional uncertainties and mounting challenges, the UFM is likely to take small steps ahead, but little effort will be made to develop a broader vision for its development. Richard Youngs argued that the EU must work more closely to understand Arabs’ demands and interests and argued for a simultaneous 'multilateralisation' of the ENP and launch of joint initiatives with Middle Eastern regional powers and international actors. Jean-Yves Moisseron called for a paradigm change. As the 'Mediterranean narrative' has failed to mobilise the southern partner, a new approach to multilateral relations is needed, based on a genuine cultural dialogue and a full association of democratically elected parliaments and civil societies from the southern Mediterranean.

The Arab uprisings have changed the domestic and the regional context of the Southern Mediterranean. The EU's response to the new geopolitical landscape has been rapid and substantial at the bilateral level, through its revision of the European Neighbourhood Policy (ENP). Yet reforming the multilateral framework of its relations with the southern partners remains a real challenge. A workshop held under the auspices of European Parliament President Martin Schulz considered the most effective ways of reinvigorating the Union for the Mediterranean (UFM). The following papers represent the contributions of three scholars who participated in the workshop. Timo Behr presented four options before he argued in favour of a more pragmatic approach. Given regional uncertainties and mounting challenges, the UFM is likely to take small steps ahead, but little effort will be made to develop a broader vision for its development. Richard Youngs argued that the EU must work more closely to understand Arabs’ demands and interests and argued for a simultaneous 'multilateralisation' of the ENP and launch of joint initiatives with Middle Eastern regional powers and international actors. Jean-Yves Moisseron called for a paradigm change. As the 'Mediterranean narrative' has failed to mobilise the southern partner, a new approach to multilateral relations is needed, based on a genuine cultural dialogue and a full association of democratically elected parliaments and civil societies from the southern Mediterranean.

Autorzy zewnętrzni

BEHR Timo (Finnish Institute of International Affairs, Helsinki, Finland), YOUNGS Richard (FRIDE, Madrid, Spain) and MOISSERON Jean Yves (Institut de Recherche pour le développement, Paris, France)