Linking Relief, Rehabilitation and Development : Towards More Effective Aid

03-07-2012

The concept of linking relief, rehabilitation and development (LRRD) has been on the international agenda for decades. The model was conceived as a response to the funding gap that was identified between relief operations and longer-term development operations following disasters. While the LRRD concept has evolved over time, its implementation on the ground has remained difficult, as demonstrated by the high number of relatively uncoordinated EU responses to crises. Yet climate change, the increase of major natural disasters, and the emergence of increasingly complex conflicts calls for an effective implementation of LRRD. The EU has repeatedly endorsed LRRD, although many challenges remain at the conceptual and operational levels. Current preparations for the financing instruments for the period 2014- 2020 — and, more specifically, the Development Cooperation Instrument — provide an opportunity to reinforce the legal provisions associated with LRRD and prepare for a better implementation on the ground. This policy briefing has been requested by the Committee on Development in anticipation of a hearing to be held on 3 September ('LRRD: Towards more effective aid'). This note should be read in conjunction with the study commissioned by the Policy Department on behalf of the Committee on Development: 'Strengthening the link between relief, rehabilitation and development in the EU's financing instruments for development and humanitarian aid under the MFF 2014-2020'.

The concept of linking relief, rehabilitation and development (LRRD) has been on the international agenda for decades. The model was conceived as a response to the funding gap that was identified between relief operations and longer-term development operations following disasters. While the LRRD concept has evolved over time, its implementation on the ground has remained difficult, as demonstrated by the high number of relatively uncoordinated EU responses to crises. Yet climate change, the increase of major natural disasters, and the emergence of increasingly complex conflicts calls for an effective implementation of LRRD. The EU has repeatedly endorsed LRRD, although many challenges remain at the conceptual and operational levels. Current preparations for the financing instruments for the period 2014- 2020 — and, more specifically, the Development Cooperation Instrument — provide an opportunity to reinforce the legal provisions associated with LRRD and prepare for a better implementation on the ground. This policy briefing has been requested by the Committee on Development in anticipation of a hearing to be held on 3 September ('LRRD: Towards more effective aid'). This note should be read in conjunction with the study commissioned by the Policy Department on behalf of the Committee on Development: 'Strengthening the link between relief, rehabilitation and development in the EU's financing instruments for development and humanitarian aid under the MFF 2014-2020'.