Coup in the Central African Republic: Chronicle of a Fall Foretold

27-03-2013

After a coalition of rebels entered the capital of the Central African Republic on 24 March, President François Bozizé fled to Cameroon. Bangui, the capital, was plunged into chaos, and the situation there remains volatile. Capping years of violent conflict, an offensive by rebel forces destabilised the country in 2012. Under international pressure, a ceasefire was brokered in January 2013, bringing a short-lived unity government to power. Following the coup, the African Union suspended the Central African Republic's membership and imposed sanctions on rebel leaders. The EU, UN, and US have all condemned the violent coup, while remaining silent on the status of the unpopular ousted president. Even before the latest rebellion, the country faced a deepening humanitarian crisis. It is essential that public order and stability are restored and that the risk of regional spillover contained. The country's new self-proclaimed President, Michel Djotodia, has pledged to maintain a power-sharing government. He will need to create a wider, inclusive political and economic model to achieve lasting stability.

After a coalition of rebels entered the capital of the Central African Republic on 24 March, President François Bozizé fled to Cameroon. Bangui, the capital, was plunged into chaos, and the situation there remains volatile. Capping years of violent conflict, an offensive by rebel forces destabilised the country in 2012. Under international pressure, a ceasefire was brokered in January 2013, bringing a short-lived unity government to power. Following the coup, the African Union suspended the Central African Republic's membership and imposed sanctions on rebel leaders. The EU, UN, and US have all condemned the violent coup, while remaining silent on the status of the unpopular ousted president. Even before the latest rebellion, the country faced a deepening humanitarian crisis. It is essential that public order and stability are restored and that the risk of regional spillover contained. The country's new self-proclaimed President, Michel Djotodia, has pledged to maintain a power-sharing government. He will need to create a wider, inclusive political and economic model to achieve lasting stability.