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Instrument for Pre-accession Assistance (IPA III)

23-11-2018

On 14 June 2018, the European Commission published a proposal for a regulation establishing the Instrument for Pre-accession Assistance (IPA) III as part of a set of external action instruments under the new 2021 to 2027 multiannual financial framework (MFF). The proposed financial envelope represents a 1.1 % decrease compared with current funding (€12.9 billion in 2018 prices). Beneficiaries include the Western Balkan countries and Turkey. The IPA, set up for the 2007 to 2013 MFF, aims to prepare ...

On 14 June 2018, the European Commission published a proposal for a regulation establishing the Instrument for Pre-accession Assistance (IPA) III as part of a set of external action instruments under the new 2021 to 2027 multiannual financial framework (MFF). The proposed financial envelope represents a 1.1 % decrease compared with current funding (€12.9 billion in 2018 prices). Beneficiaries include the Western Balkan countries and Turkey. The IPA, set up for the 2007 to 2013 MFF, aims to prepare candidate and potential candidate countries for EU membership and supports them in adopting and implementing the necessary political, institutional, legal, administrative, social and economic reforms. IPA III is clearly positioned in the context of the new Western Balkan strategy, adopted in February 2018, and builds in flexibility via à vis the evolving situation in Turkey. It is also designed to complement the EU's internal policies. In Parliament, the file has been allocated to the Committee for Foreign Affairs (AFET), with José Ignacio Salafranca Sánchez-Neyra (EPP, Spain) and Knut Fleckenstein (S&D, Germany) as co-rapporteurs. The draft report presented by the rapporteurs on 30 October 2018 is now awaiting adoption by AFET. First edition. EU Legislation in Progress briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

EU external financing instruments and the post-2020 architecture: European Implementation Assessment

28-02-2018

This study evaluates the performance of the EU external financing instruments (EFIs) in the light of the results of the European Commission’s mid-term review and discussions on their post-2020 architecture. This evaluation finds that the existing architecture and geographic/thematic coverage of the EFIs has, overall, been relevant to the EU policy objectives set in 2014. However, they were less responsive to recipients’ needs, and implementation weaknesses persist. At the strategic level, weaknesses ...

This study evaluates the performance of the EU external financing instruments (EFIs) in the light of the results of the European Commission’s mid-term review and discussions on their post-2020 architecture. This evaluation finds that the existing architecture and geographic/thematic coverage of the EFIs has, overall, been relevant to the EU policy objectives set in 2014. However, they were less responsive to recipients’ needs, and implementation weaknesses persist. At the strategic level, weaknesses in EFIs that need attention in the post-2020 architecture include: balancing short-term expediency with long-term needs; ensuring EU security needs and interests do not marginalise EU values; and safeguarding the development-oriented agenda of EFIs. At an operational level, the EFIs need to overcome the ‘silo’ approach to implementation, and develop solid monitoring and evaluation systems that assess the EFIs’ impact in recipient countries. This study provides options for tackling these limitations, including the need to integrate simplification, ensure sustainability of EU action, strengthen flexibility while remaining consistent and committed to EU fundamental values, create multi-actor partnerships, link EU action to EU strategies, and strengthen EU strategic communication. The annexed expert paper found that EU support to civil society in Turkey, Ukraine and Egypt has improved in recent years, but it still struggles to meet new challenges. Neither radical simplification of the EFIs nor a dedicated civil society instrument would necessarily improve civil society support, and may involve serious drawbacks. The EU’s most pressing challenges are to link civil society more effectively to reform-oriented aid; find ways to support new civic actors; temper the current assault on civil society organisations; and to find more nuanced ways to link civil society to strategic goals.

Autorzy zewnętrzni

Annex: EU Support to Civil Society in Turkey, Ukraine and Egypt: Mapping reforms to the external financing instruments, written by Professor Richard Youngs, Carnegie Europe.

Partnerzy południowi

01-02-2018

Europejska polityka sąsiedztwa (EPS) dotyczy Algierii, Egiptu, Izraela, Jordanii, Libanu, Libii, Maroka, Palestyny, Syrii i Tunezji. Obejmuje ona dwustronne strategie polityczne między UE i każdym z 10 państw partnerskich oraz ogólne ramy współpracy regionalnej – Unię dla Śródziemnomorza. W reakcji na rewolty w jej południowym sąsiedztwie Unia Europejska w 2011 r. zwiększyła swoje wsparcie dla demokratycznych przemian udzielane w ramach EPS, a w 2015 r. dokonała kolejnego przeglądu EPS.

Europejska polityka sąsiedztwa (EPS) dotyczy Algierii, Egiptu, Izraela, Jordanii, Libanu, Libii, Maroka, Palestyny, Syrii i Tunezji. Obejmuje ona dwustronne strategie polityczne między UE i każdym z 10 państw partnerskich oraz ogólne ramy współpracy regionalnej – Unię dla Śródziemnomorza. W reakcji na rewolty w jej południowym sąsiedztwie Unia Europejska w 2011 r. zwiększyła swoje wsparcie dla demokratycznych przemian udzielane w ramach EPS, a w 2015 r. dokonała kolejnego przeglądu EPS.

Europejska polityka sąsiedztwa

01-01-2018

Europejska polityka sąsiedztwa (EPS) obejmuje następujące państwa: Algierię, Armenię, Azerbejdżan, Białoruś, Egipt, Gruzję, Izrael, Jordanię, Liban, Libię, Maroko, Mołdawię, Palestynę, Syrię, Tunezję i Ukrainę. Służy ona poprawie powszechnego dobrobytu, stabilności i bezpieczeństwa. Jej podstawę stanowią demokracja, praworządność i poszanowanie praw człowieka. Jest to polityka dwustronna między UE i poszczególnymi krajami partnerskimi, w ramach której prowadzone są inicjatywy współpracy regionalnej ...

Europejska polityka sąsiedztwa (EPS) obejmuje następujące państwa: Algierię, Armenię, Azerbejdżan, Białoruś, Egipt, Gruzję, Izrael, Jordanię, Liban, Libię, Maroko, Mołdawię, Palestynę, Syrię, Tunezję i Ukrainę. Służy ona poprawie powszechnego dobrobytu, stabilności i bezpieczeństwa. Jej podstawę stanowią demokracja, praworządność i poszanowanie praw człowieka. Jest to polityka dwustronna między UE i poszczególnymi krajami partnerskimi, w ramach której prowadzone są inicjatywy współpracy regionalnej: Partnerstwo Wschodnie i Unia dla Śródziemnomorza[1].

Porozumienie pojednawcze w sprawie budżetu UE na 2018 r.

24-11-2017

W dniu 18 listopada negocjatorzy Parlamentu Europejskiego i Rady osiągnęli wstępne porozumienie w sprawie budżetu UE na rok 2018. Oczekuje się, że wspólny tekst, który przewiduje łączne zobowiązania w wysokości 160,11 mld EUR i łączne płatności w wysokości 144,68 mld EUR, zostanie przyjęty przez Radę, a następnie poddany pod głosowanie w Parlamencie na posiedzeniu plenarnym podczas drugiej sesji listopadowej.

W dniu 18 listopada negocjatorzy Parlamentu Europejskiego i Rady osiągnęli wstępne porozumienie w sprawie budżetu UE na rok 2018. Oczekuje się, że wspólny tekst, który przewiduje łączne zobowiązania w wysokości 160,11 mld EUR i łączne płatności w wysokości 144,68 mld EUR, zostanie przyjęty przez Radę, a następnie poddany pod głosowanie w Parlamencie na posiedzeniu plenarnym podczas drugiej sesji listopadowej.

Autorzy zewnętrzni

Jędrzejewska, Sidonia

Implementation of macro-regional strategies

26-09-2017

While each macro-regional strategy is unique in terms of the countries it brings together and the scope of its policies, they all share the same common aim: to ensure a coordinated approach to issues that are best tackled together. Building on the success of the pioneering 2009 European Union strategy for the Baltic Sea region, this form of cooperation has since become firmly embedded in the EU's institutional framework, with four strategies now in place, covering a total of 19 Member States and ...

While each macro-regional strategy is unique in terms of the countries it brings together and the scope of its policies, they all share the same common aim: to ensure a coordinated approach to issues that are best tackled together. Building on the success of the pioneering 2009 European Union strategy for the Baltic Sea region, this form of cooperation has since become firmly embedded in the EU's institutional framework, with four strategies now in place, covering a total of 19 Member States and eight third countries. Every two years, the European Commission publishes a report to assess the implementation of these strategies, most recently in 2016. With the views of stakeholders and other players helping to complete the picture, it is possible to identify a number of challenges common to all macro-regional strategies in areas such as governance, funding, political commitment or the need to be more result oriented. As discussions begin on the future of cohesion policy, and the role of macro-regional strategies within the post 2020 framework, this can help focus debate to chart new solutions for the future. Parliament is also involved in this debate, with the Committee on Regional Development now preparing a report on the implementation of macro-regional strategies, while the current Estonian EU Presidency has committed to advancing political discussion on the future of cohesion policy. As plans for a new Carpathian strategy emerge, the importance of consolidating the position of macro-regional strategies within the future cohesion policy framework has arguably become more important than ever.

EU-Russia cooperation on higher education

21-09-2017

EU funding from the Erasmus+ programme supports cooperation between EU and Russian universities, which remains close despite current tensions. Russia is still the largest non-EU partner in the programme and some activities (such as student and staff exchanges) have actually increased since 2014.

EU funding from the Erasmus+ programme supports cooperation between EU and Russian universities, which remains close despite current tensions. Russia is still the largest non-EU partner in the programme and some activities (such as student and staff exchanges) have actually increased since 2014.

EU-Russia cross-border cooperation

21-09-2017

Despite current EU-Russia tensions, cross-border cooperation programmes continue unaffected. As well as promoting people-to-people contacts, such programmes deliver economic and other benefits to participants, especially on the Russian side of the border.

Despite current EU-Russia tensions, cross-border cooperation programmes continue unaffected. As well as promoting people-to-people contacts, such programmes deliver economic and other benefits to participants, especially on the Russian side of the border.

Decentralised cooperation in the context of the 2030 Agenda

16-06-2017

Cooperation between sub-national authorities is a potentially powerful tool for the local implementation and public ownership of the 2030 Agenda. Without application at every level that ambitious, comprehensive agenda might never come to fruition.

Cooperation between sub-national authorities is a potentially powerful tool for the local implementation and public ownership of the 2030 Agenda. Without application at every level that ambitious, comprehensive agenda might never come to fruition.

Instrument for Pre-accession Assistance (IPA II)

30-05-2017

The Instrument for Pre-accession Assistance (IPA) is a programme of the European Union for enlargement countries that was established for the 2007 to 2013 programming period and that replaced several former pre-accession assistance programmes. Under the current 2014 to 2020 multiannual financial framework, the new phase of the programme is called IPA II. The pre-accession funds help current and potential candidate countries to cope with political and economic reforms and to progressively align to ...

The Instrument for Pre-accession Assistance (IPA) is a programme of the European Union for enlargement countries that was established for the 2007 to 2013 programming period and that replaced several former pre-accession assistance programmes. Under the current 2014 to 2020 multiannual financial framework, the new phase of the programme is called IPA II. The pre-accession funds help current and potential candidate countries to cope with political and economic reforms and to progressively align to the European Union's rules, standards, policies and practices on their path towards EU membership.

Planowane wydarzenia

25-06-2019
Meeting EU energy and climate goals: Energy storage for grids and low-carbon mobility
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