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Tipo de publicação
Domínio de intervenção
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Data

Parceiros Meridionais

01-02-2018

A Política Europeia de Vizinhança (PEV) abrange a Argélia, o Egito, Israel, a Jordânia, o Líbano, a Líbia, Marrocos, a Palestina, a Síria e a Tunísia. A PEV é constituída por políticas bilaterais entre a UE e cada um dos dez países parceiros e por um quadro de cooperação regional, a União para o Mediterrâneo. Em 2011, em resposta às sublevações na sua vizinhança meridional, a UE reforçou o seu apoio às transformações democráticas através da PEV. Em 2015, a UE procedeu a uma revisão desta política ...

A Política Europeia de Vizinhança (PEV) abrange a Argélia, o Egito, Israel, a Jordânia, o Líbano, a Líbia, Marrocos, a Palestina, a Síria e a Tunísia. A PEV é constituída por políticas bilaterais entre a UE e cada um dos dez países parceiros e por um quadro de cooperação regional, a União para o Mediterrâneo. Em 2011, em resposta às sublevações na sua vizinhança meridional, a UE reforçou o seu apoio às transformações democráticas através da PEV. Em 2015, a UE procedeu a uma revisão desta política.

EU participation in the PRIMA partnership

07-06-2017

The European Parliament is expected to vote on the decision to allow the financial participation of the European Union in the Partnership for Research and Innovation in the Mediterranean Area (PRIMA) during the June 2017 plenary. This public-public partnership would support collaborative research and innovation projects on agro-food systems and water management between institutions of the EU and of third countries around the Mediterranean shore. The Union contribution under Horizon 2020 could reach ...

The European Parliament is expected to vote on the decision to allow the financial participation of the European Union in the Partnership for Research and Innovation in the Mediterranean Area (PRIMA) during the June 2017 plenary. This public-public partnership would support collaborative research and innovation projects on agro-food systems and water management between institutions of the EU and of third countries around the Mediterranean shore. The Union contribution under Horizon 2020 could reach a maximum of €220 million over 10 years.

The EU and migration [What Think Tank are thinking]

10-02-2017

At their meeting in Malta on 3 February, 2017, EU heads of states and government endorsed further objectives to ease the migratory challenge, with a view to stemming irregular migration flows through the central Mediterranean route. The plan foresees ‘immediate operational measures’ focused on training and supporting the Libyan coastguard in an effort to interrupt people-smuggling and to increase the number of search and rescue missions. As regards returns, the EU wants to ensure adequate reception ...

At their meeting in Malta on 3 February, 2017, EU heads of states and government endorsed further objectives to ease the migratory challenge, with a view to stemming irregular migration flows through the central Mediterranean route. The plan foresees ‘immediate operational measures’ focused on training and supporting the Libyan coastguard in an effort to interrupt people-smuggling and to increase the number of search and rescue missions. As regards returns, the EU wants to ensure adequate reception conditions for migrants in Libya, with help from UNHCR and the International Organisation for Migration. This note offers links to recent commentaries and studies on migration from major international think-tanks and research institutes. Earlier papers on the same topic can be found in a previous edition of 'What Think Tanks are thinking', published in September 2016.

Counter-terrorism Cooperation with the Southern Neighbourhood

02-02-2017

Since the EU adopted its Counter-Terrorism Strategy in 2005, it has focused on forging closer ties with third countries in the fight against terrorism. Cooperation with the Southern Neighbourhood in this field is particularly important. Every single country within this region is affected by terrorism to different degrees and terrorist attacks on European soil are increasingly linked with the Middle East and North Africa. The EU adopted a wide-ranging counter-terrorism approach in the South including ...

Since the EU adopted its Counter-Terrorism Strategy in 2005, it has focused on forging closer ties with third countries in the fight against terrorism. Cooperation with the Southern Neighbourhood in this field is particularly important. Every single country within this region is affected by terrorism to different degrees and terrorist attacks on European soil are increasingly linked with the Middle East and North Africa. The EU adopted a wide-ranging counter-terrorism approach in the South including actions that go beyond the strictly military and security interpretations of counter-terrorism. In line with the UN’s 4-pillar approach, the EU’s counter-terrorism measures can be broadly subdivided into four fields: (i) building state capacity (particularly in the areas of border control, criminal investigation and prosecution, and countering the financing of terrorism); (ii) strengthening the rule of law and respect for human rights; (iii) fostering regional cooperation; and (iv) preventing and combating terrorism. This study outlines and contextualises current counter-terrorism activities in the region.

Autor externo

Florence GAUB, Annelies PAUWELS

The European Neighbourhood Policy

20-12-2016

Since 2004, the European Neighbourhood Policy has provided a framework for relations between the EU and its 16 geographically closest neighbours. This framework offers enhanced cooperation and access to the European market by means of bilateral action plans leading ultimately to association agreements. It is complemented by three regional initiatives: the Union for the Mediterranean (UfM), the Black Sea Synergy and the Eastern Partnership. The UfM and the Eastern Partnership are multilateral and ...

Since 2004, the European Neighbourhood Policy has provided a framework for relations between the EU and its 16 geographically closest neighbours. This framework offers enhanced cooperation and access to the European market by means of bilateral action plans leading ultimately to association agreements. It is complemented by three regional initiatives: the Union for the Mediterranean (UfM), the Black Sea Synergy and the Eastern Partnership. The UfM and the Eastern Partnership are multilateral and involve shared institutions (Euro-Mediterranean Assembly, Euronest, regular summits). The major geopolitical upheavals brought about by the Arab Spring in the southern Mediterranean since 2011 and by the conflict in Ukraine since 2014 have prompted the EU to overhaul what it is doing in the neighbourhood. That overhaul – and action to put it into practice – must succeed if the EU is to assert itself as an international player. For that reason, in November 2015 the Commission and the European External Action Service published a communication on reforming the European Neighbourhood Policy.

Resilience in the EU's foreign and security policy

15-06-2016

The migratory pressure with which the European Union is struggling is yet more evidence that distance or the natural borders inherent in seas, mountains and deserts are of little significance when people are confronted with challenges like conflict, fragility or failure of governance. The scale of conflicts, natural hazards, water shortages and state collapse suggests that things will only get worse – unless a new policy paradigm is effectively implemented. Resilience – understood as the capacity ...

The migratory pressure with which the European Union is struggling is yet more evidence that distance or the natural borders inherent in seas, mountains and deserts are of little significance when people are confronted with challenges like conflict, fragility or failure of governance. The scale of conflicts, natural hazards, water shortages and state collapse suggests that things will only get worse – unless a new policy paradigm is effectively implemented. Resilience – understood as the capacity of different layers of society to withstand, to adapt to, and to recover quickly from stresses and shocks – has gradually emerged as an answer to the growing complexity of the international security environment. In the EU context, the concept of resilience combines different policy areas: humanitarian aid, development assistance, disaster-risk reduction, climate-change adaptation, conflict prevention and peacebuilding. As a relatively new addition to EU jargon, the aim of building societal resilience still needs to be translated into tangible, practicable measures. This briefing complements an earlier briefing, Risk and resilience in foreign policy, published in September 2015.

Supporting European Security and Defence with Existing EU Measures and Procedures

30-10-2015

Focusing on the support of non-CSDP policies for CSDP measures, both in the field of crisis management and defence, this study submits that CSDP cannot effectively contribute to EU external action by itself, but only in coherence with other EU policies and instruments. The study focuses on nine different issue areas of the EU which are of particular interest in the context of CSDP: European Neighbourhood Policy, development cooperation, internal policies and financing instruments in the context of ...

Focusing on the support of non-CSDP policies for CSDP measures, both in the field of crisis management and defence, this study submits that CSDP cannot effectively contribute to EU external action by itself, but only in coherence with other EU policies and instruments. The study focuses on nine different issue areas of the EU which are of particular interest in the context of CSDP: European Neighbourhood Policy, development cooperation, internal policies and financing instruments in the context of the EU’s international crisis management, as well as innovation policies, industrial policies, regional policy, trade policy and space policy in the context of the EU’s defence policy. The study builds on existing evidence of synergising effects of CSDP and other non-CSDP policies and points to the potential impact which the closer interplay of CSDP and non-CSDP policies could have. Focusing on policy adaptation as well as institutional cooperation of EU actors in each of the policy relationships, the study provides a comprehensive overview of the linkage between CSDP and each of the respective policies and draws a large set of tailor-made recommendations in the field.

Autor externo

Kolja RAUBE (University of Leuven, Belgium), Jan WOUTERS (University of Leuven, Belgium), Federica BICCHI (London School of Economics, United Kingdom), Philip DE MAN (University of Leuven, Belgium), Daniel FIOTT (Free University of Brussels, Belgium), Damien HELLY (European Centre for Development Policy Management, the Netherlands), Christian KAUNERT (University of Dundee, United Kingdom), Chantal LAVALLEE (University of Dundee, United Kingdom), Jocelyn MAWDSLEY (University of Nottingham, United Kingdom) and Licinia SIMAO (University of Coimbra, Portugal)

The European Neighbourhood Policy

23-10-2015

Since 2004, the European Neighbourhood Policy has provided a framework for relations between the EU and its 16 geographically closest neighbours. This framework offers enhanced cooperation and access to the European market by means of bilateral action plans leading ultimately to association agreements. It is complemented by three regional initiatives: the Union for the Mediterranean (UfM), the Black Sea Synergy and the Eastern Partnership. The UfM and the Eastern Partnership are multilateral and ...

Since 2004, the European Neighbourhood Policy has provided a framework for relations between the EU and its 16 geographically closest neighbours. This framework offers enhanced cooperation and access to the European market by means of bilateral action plans leading ultimately to association agreements. It is complemented by three regional initiatives: the Union for the Mediterranean (UfM), the Black Sea Synergy and the Eastern Partnership. The UfM and the Eastern Partnership are multilateral and involve shared institutions (Euro-Mediterranean Assembly, Euronest, regular summits). The major geopolitical upheavals brought about by the Arab Spring in the southern Mediterranean since 2011 and by the conflict in Ukraine since 2014 have prompted the EU to overhaul what it is doing in the neighbourhood. That overhaul – and action to put it into practice – must succeed if the EU is to assert itself as an international player. For that reason, in March 2015 the Commission and the European External Action Service published a consultation paper on reforming the European Neighbourhood Policy.

The EU's Southern Neighbourhood [What Think Tanks are thinking]

31-07-2015

The European Union's relations with Mediterranean countries form part of a broader European Neighbourhood Policy. This creates a framework for bilateral and regional cooperation with Algeria, Egypt, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Palestine, Syria and Tunisia. A key element, agreed in 2011 following the 'Arab Spring' uprisings in the region, is the 'more for more' approach, which envisages closer relations in terms of financial assistance, travel and trade for those countries that pursue ...

The European Union's relations with Mediterranean countries form part of a broader European Neighbourhood Policy. This creates a framework for bilateral and regional cooperation with Algeria, Egypt, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Palestine, Syria and Tunisia. A key element, agreed in 2011 following the 'Arab Spring' uprisings in the region, is the 'more for more' approach, which envisages closer relations in terms of financial assistance, travel and trade for those countries that pursue democratic and economic reforms. According to many analysts, the effectiveness of the policy has been challenged by political instability in many countries of the region and the growth of illegal migration to Europe. This 'At a glance' note highlights a selection of recent studies by major international think tanks on the EU's Southern Neighbourhood Policy, with papers on migration grouped as a separate category.

Regional Integration in the Mediterranean - Impact and Limits of Community and Bilateral Policies

25-04-2014

The economic integration of the south and east Mediterranean partner countries with Europe has made very little progress, just as relations between them are not showing signs of development. The immediate periphery of the Union has not yet become a dynamic area of trade with Europe, and Community aid, which is focused on the commercial aspects, has not managed to stimulate sufficient economic growth in its neighbours to absorb new entrants on to the labour market. This lack of regional economic dynamism ...

The economic integration of the south and east Mediterranean partner countries with Europe has made very little progress, just as relations between them are not showing signs of development. The immediate periphery of the Union has not yet become a dynamic area of trade with Europe, and Community aid, which is focused on the commercial aspects, has not managed to stimulate sufficient economic growth in its neighbours to absorb new entrants on to the labour market. This lack of regional economic dynamism is in contrast with the intensity of human relations which has developed over a long period due to the presence of an essentially North African and Turkish diaspora in Europe and the North-South tourist traffic to the Mediterranean, which are undervalued. While the Arab revolutions are a reminder that the movement of ideas and people goes hand in hand with a greater homogeneity of lifestyles and aspirations from a democratic and social viewpoint, little has been done in a Euro- Mediterranean context to encourage this movement, particularly from a social and political standpoint. We should therefore redirect the priorities of European aid from a commercial emphasis to a truly industrial policy and set out a politicial and social priority for the region.

Autor externo

Cécile JOLLY (Commissariat général à la stratégie et à la prospective, sous l'Office du Premier ministre, France)

Futuros eventos

10-12-2019
EU institutional dynamics: Ten years after the Lisbon Treaty
Outro evento -
EPRS
11-12-2019
Take-aways from 2019 and outlook for 2020: What Think Tanks are Thinking
Outro evento -
EPRS

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