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EU policies – Delivering for citizens: Promoting equality between women and men

28-06-2019

The European Union (EU) is committed to eliminating inequalities and promoting gender equality 'in all its activities' and has made considerable advances over the years. Nevertheless, the situation remains uneven across the EU, and in recent times progress has slowed, stalled or even regressed in some areas. Yet, the evidence points clearly to the benefits of gender equality for individuals, the economy and society as a whole. Public opinion surveys show that a large majority of Europeans agree that ...

The European Union (EU) is committed to eliminating inequalities and promoting gender equality 'in all its activities' and has made considerable advances over the years. Nevertheless, the situation remains uneven across the EU, and in recent times progress has slowed, stalled or even regressed in some areas. Yet, the evidence points clearly to the benefits of gender equality for individuals, the economy and society as a whole. Public opinion surveys show that a large majority of Europeans agree that promoting gender equality is important for a fair and democratic society, the economy and for them personally and that a growing share of citizens would like the EU to do more in this area. Europeans also expect increased EU action on related policies. During the last legislative term, as part of a broader gender equality programme, the EU institutions have been working on proposals for new EU laws to improve work-life balance and combat violence against women. Promoting equality between women and men will remain one of the major challenges in the coming years. Demographic trends, technological developments and changes to the way we work are just some of the issues where different impacts on women and men will need to be considered. Options for further EU involvement could include better implementation and enforcement of existing legislation, moves to modernise it, fill gaps in protection and address emerging issues, and non-legislative measures such as data collection and monitoring, awareness-raising, and support for national and grassroots initiatives. It will require the political will at all levels to tackle issues across a broad spectrum of policies, together with the provision of the necessary institutions, tools and resources to put that resolve into action. This is an update of an earlier briefing issued in advance of the 2019 European elections.

Backlash in Gender Equality and Women’s and Girls’ Rights

15-06-2018

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the FEMM Committee, is designed to identify in which fields and by which means the backlash in gender equality and women’s and girls’ rights in six countries (Austria, Hungary, Italy, Poland, Romania, and Slovakia) is occurring. The backlash, which has been happening over the last several years, has decreased the level of protection of women and girls and reduced ...

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the FEMM Committee, is designed to identify in which fields and by which means the backlash in gender equality and women’s and girls’ rights in six countries (Austria, Hungary, Italy, Poland, Romania, and Slovakia) is occurring. The backlash, which has been happening over the last several years, has decreased the level of protection of women and girls and reduced access to their rights.

Autor externo

Borbála JUHÁSZ, indipendent expert to EIGE dr. Enikő PAP, legal expert on gender issues, NANE Women's Rights Association National experts: Christiane Ugbor, Sophie Hansal (Austria), Dr. Gabriella Ilonszki (Hungary), Siusi Casaccia (Italy), Zuzana Maďarová (Slovakia), Laura Albu (Romania), Małgorzata Tarasiewicz (Poland)

Women in CSDP missions

06-12-2017

Promoting women’s participation in CSDP missions and operations is important to sustain EU’s credibility, to improve effectiveness, to promote equality at home and abroad, to increase the talent pool for personnel, and to make the best use of our financial resources. More needs to be done by both member states and the EU to fulfil promises to implement the United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325 on Women, Peace and Security. This report looks at three issues that contribute to more inclusion ...

Promoting women’s participation in CSDP missions and operations is important to sustain EU’s credibility, to improve effectiveness, to promote equality at home and abroad, to increase the talent pool for personnel, and to make the best use of our financial resources. More needs to be done by both member states and the EU to fulfil promises to implement the United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325 on Women, Peace and Security. This report looks at three issues that contribute to more inclusion and better effectiveness: First, the structures that promote equality in the security sector institutions within the EU; second, the effects of women’s participation in missions and operations; third, how CSDP structures and EU member states policies could be further adapted to create a working environment that is conducive to both men and women contributing their full potential to better solutions to security challenges. Political commitment and hands-on leadership by the EU and its Member States is key to more diversity and inclusivity in CSDP structures. A pro-active approach to recruitment and retention of female staff, adapted job-descriptions, comprehensive family policies, and employing an approach that values diversity and creates a positive work environment are all necessary in this regard.

Autor externo

WIIS, Women in International Security Brussels, Belgium

Work-life balance for parents and carers

25-09-2017

This note seeks to provide an initial analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission impact assessment (IA) accompanying the above proposal, submitted on 26 April 2017 and referred to Parliament’s Committee on Employment and Social Affairs. The proposal is a follow-up to the withdrawal of the Commission's proposal to revise Council Directive 92/85/EEC (the Maternity Leave Directive). After the withdrawal, the Commission announced its intention to prepare a new initiative with ...

This note seeks to provide an initial analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission impact assessment (IA) accompanying the above proposal, submitted on 26 April 2017 and referred to Parliament’s Committee on Employment and Social Affairs. The proposal is a follow-up to the withdrawal of the Commission's proposal to revise Council Directive 92/85/EEC (the Maternity Leave Directive). After the withdrawal, the Commission announced its intention to prepare a new initiative with a broader approach. The European Parliament has called in its resolutions for a comprehensive proposal from the Commission on work-life balance. In line with the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU), the Commission conducted a two-stage consultation with the social partners on work-life balance. There was no agreement among social partners to enter into direct negotiations to conclude an EU level agreement. A roadmap for the new initiative was published in August 2015 and the initiative was included in the Commission's 2017 work programme within the framework of the European Pillar of Social Rights. The Commission's proposal for a directive is part of a package of measures aiming to address women's underrepresentation in employment by improving conditions to reconcile work and family duties. The proposal builds on existing EU legislation (especially Directive 2010/18/EU on parental leave), policies and best practices of the Member States in the area of work-life balance.

Gender Equality Policies in Croatia - Update

14-07-2017

This study was commissioned by the European Parliament's Committee on Women’s rights and Gender Equality (FEMM). It provides an overview of gender equality policies in Croatia. Apart from providing the history of institutional and political development in Croatia in this area, it illustrates in particular issues related to gender equality in the labour market and employment, women entrepreneurs, women in decision-making positions, policies against violence against women, reconciliation of private ...

This study was commissioned by the European Parliament's Committee on Women’s rights and Gender Equality (FEMM). It provides an overview of gender equality policies in Croatia. Apart from providing the history of institutional and political development in Croatia in this area, it illustrates in particular issues related to gender equality in the labour market and employment, women entrepreneurs, women in decision-making positions, policies against violence against women, reconciliation of private and professional life, gender stereotypes, sexual health and rights, economic independence for women and men, pay and pension gap, as well as national policies on eradication of gender based violence.

Autor externo

Nada BODIROGA-VUKOBRAT, Adrijana MARTINOVIĆ,Faculty of Law, University of Rijeka, Croatia

Parental Leave Directive

12-05-2017

For several years, EU policies have been aimed at improving the working and living conditions of working parents and ensuring better reconciliation of their professional and private life. Different pieces of legislation promote the rights of working parents, such as Council Directive 92/85/EEC (Maternity Leave Directive), protecting pregnant workers and workers who have recently given birth or are breastfeeding, and Council Directive 2010/18/EU (Parental Leave Directive), establishing the leave conditions ...

For several years, EU policies have been aimed at improving the working and living conditions of working parents and ensuring better reconciliation of their professional and private life. Different pieces of legislation promote the rights of working parents, such as Council Directive 92/85/EEC (Maternity Leave Directive), protecting pregnant workers and workers who have recently given birth or are breastfeeding, and Council Directive 2010/18/EU (Parental Leave Directive), establishing the leave conditions for male and female workers. In 2008, the European Commission submitted a new legislative proposal, seeking to modify the provisions of the Maternity Leave Directive. Given that after more than four years the co-legislators had still not been able to reach an agreement, the European Commission decided to withdraw the proposal in 2015. A further initiative was submitted in early 2017 within the European Pillar of Social Rights, this time seeking to repeal the Parental Leave Directive and to encourage a better work-life balance. It is the Parental Leave Directive that is the subject of this appraisal.

Gender equality policies in Slovakia

14-04-2017

The Slovak Republic addresses equality between women and men both in its national legislation and relevant strategic materials and documents. With the aim to strengthen institutional support for women and development of effective policies and programmes, the Slovak republic made necessary changes in legislation and adjusted policies to better facilitate creation of conditions for effective implementation of systematic measures at the institutional level. These have been essential in the effort to ...

The Slovak Republic addresses equality between women and men both in its national legislation and relevant strategic materials and documents. With the aim to strengthen institutional support for women and development of effective policies and programmes, the Slovak republic made necessary changes in legislation and adjusted policies to better facilitate creation of conditions for effective implementation of systematic measures at the institutional level. These have been essential in the effort to achieve gender equality and eliminate gender inequalities in the society.

Autor externo

Silvia PORUBANOVA, Institute for Labour and Family Research

Empowering women in the EU and beyond: Labour market

02-03-2017

Equal access to the labour market is recognised as a cornerstone of women’s economic independence and participation in public life. The EU and its Member States have obligations to integrate those excluded from the labour market (Article 151 TFEU), advance gender equality in employment (Article 153 TFEU; Directive 2006/54/ EC), and ensure equal pay for work of equal value (Article 157 TFEU). All EU Member States have ratified the 1979 UN Convention on the Elimination of all forms of Discrimination ...

Equal access to the labour market is recognised as a cornerstone of women’s economic independence and participation in public life. The EU and its Member States have obligations to integrate those excluded from the labour market (Article 151 TFEU), advance gender equality in employment (Article 153 TFEU; Directive 2006/54/ EC), and ensure equal pay for work of equal value (Article 157 TFEU). All EU Member States have ratified the 1979 UN Convention on the Elimination of all forms of Discrimination against Women, which upholds women’s rights to work, equal opportunities and social benefits (Article 11).

Maternity and paternity leave in the EU

15-12-2016

This infographic aims to present the current state of affairs of maternity and paternity leave in EU Member States. Maternity leave policies in EU Member States are governed by the 1992 Pregnant Workers Directive. After an unsuccessful attempt to introduce a new maternity leave directive, the Commission has announced a new, more holistic package as a replacement.

This infographic aims to present the current state of affairs of maternity and paternity leave in EU Member States. Maternity leave policies in EU Member States are governed by the 1992 Pregnant Workers Directive. After an unsuccessful attempt to introduce a new maternity leave directive, the Commission has announced a new, more holistic package as a replacement.

Demography and Family Policies from a Gender Perspective

07-12-2016

The European Union is in the midst of three crises: the economic, the demographic and the refugee. This study evaluates policies aiming at increasing fertility through work-life balance, reveals their interrelation with family policies and economic priorities and suggests ways of addressing challenges on all three fronts with the view to minimise their gendered outcomes.

The European Union is in the midst of three crises: the economic, the demographic and the refugee. This study evaluates policies aiming at increasing fertility through work-life balance, reveals their interrelation with family policies and economic priorities and suggests ways of addressing challenges on all three fronts with the view to minimise their gendered outcomes.

Autor externo

Konstantina DAVAKI (London School of Economics and Political Sciences, the UK)

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