Constitutional reform in Bolivia

18-02-2016

On 21 February 2016, the Plurinational State of Bolivia will hold a popular referendum on constitutional reform to decide whether to authorise a second consecutive presidential re-election. If this reform is approved, President Evo Morales, who recently started his third consecutive term in office – the second since the approval of the 2009 Constitution – will be able to run again in 2019 and thus potentially stay in power until 2025. Morales and his MAS party justify the reform as one that would enable him to fulfil his 'patriotic agenda', but the opposition fears that this could lead to the perpetuation of his power. Though Morales expects to win, recent polls show that the outcome is far from clear, with some showing 'yes', and some 'no', poised to win by a narrow margin.

On 21 February 2016, the Plurinational State of Bolivia will hold a popular referendum on constitutional reform to decide whether to authorise a second consecutive presidential re-election. If this reform is approved, President Evo Morales, who recently started his third consecutive term in office – the second since the approval of the 2009 Constitution – will be able to run again in 2019 and thus potentially stay in power until 2025. Morales and his MAS party justify the reform as one that would enable him to fulfil his 'patriotic agenda', but the opposition fears that this could lead to the perpetuation of his power. Though Morales expects to win, recent polls show that the outcome is far from clear, with some showing 'yes', and some 'no', poised to win by a narrow margin.