An overview of the EU Youth Strategy 2013-2015

27-01-2016

Against a backdrop of high youth unemployment and the threat of marginalisation, the European Union (EU) Youth Strategy encourages Member States to consider young people as a resource, by developing specific actions within youth policy and by working with other areas in a cross-sectoral approach. Coordination between youth and educational policies in order to develop competencies that are sought after by labour markets, as well as entrepreneurial abilities and civic skills is a particular priority in the Strategy. Other areas of EU policy are also concerned; a complex array of issues needs to be addressed, such as youth mobility, the transmission of poverty, participation in sports and culture, social integration, health and wellbeing, political participation, and an engagement with world issues. The EU Strategy is governed by the Open Method of Coordination, a soft approach applied in areas of policy where the EU has no legislative power. Evidence-based policy-making is at its heart and the approach is based on the quantitative measurement of a set of indicators, as well as peer-learning activities that promote policy reforms. Young people's active engagement is established through a process known as 'structured dialogue', bringing them into contact with policy-makers, but a more representative participation and concrete improvements on the ground remain challenges for the future. The European Parliament contributes to the debate on the Strategy by issuing own-initiative resolutions ahead of the Council and Commission joint reports which review implementation every three years.

Against a backdrop of high youth unemployment and the threat of marginalisation, the European Union (EU) Youth Strategy encourages Member States to consider young people as a resource, by developing specific actions within youth policy and by working with other areas in a cross-sectoral approach. Coordination between youth and educational policies in order to develop competencies that are sought after by labour markets, as well as entrepreneurial abilities and civic skills is a particular priority in the Strategy. Other areas of EU policy are also concerned; a complex array of issues needs to be addressed, such as youth mobility, the transmission of poverty, participation in sports and culture, social integration, health and wellbeing, political participation, and an engagement with world issues. The EU Strategy is governed by the Open Method of Coordination, a soft approach applied in areas of policy where the EU has no legislative power. Evidence-based policy-making is at its heart and the approach is based on the quantitative measurement of a set of indicators, as well as peer-learning activities that promote policy reforms. Young people's active engagement is established through a process known as 'structured dialogue', bringing them into contact with policy-makers, but a more representative participation and concrete improvements on the ground remain challenges for the future. The European Parliament contributes to the debate on the Strategy by issuing own-initiative resolutions ahead of the Council and Commission joint reports which review implementation every three years.