Implementation of EU policies following the UN Security Council resolution 1325

29-11-2010

This study analyses EU progress on implementing UN Security Council Resolution (UNSCR) 1325 and related EU instruments, pertaining to the area of women and armed conflict. It gives a general global overview of where the international community stands on implementing the 2000 UNSCR 1325 on women peace and security and subsequent relevant UNSCRs 1820, 1888 and 1889 and then an analysis of EU policies and structures devised to implement the UNSCRs and EU guidelines on human rights. In CSDP missions, substantial progress has been made in integrating gender in Joint Actions, but implementing 1325 in planning and fact-finding is still not automatic. Another strong advance is the increase in Gender and Human Rights Advisors – with there now being 34 across the current 13 missions. Work still needs to be done on strong Code of Conduct and dedicating budgets to the financing of mission activities on gender implementation. The study also concludes that the EU needs to continue to strengthen partnering and working with locals and local organisations (including in skills training) that fully understand and know how to work within their cultural and political constraints.

This study analyses EU progress on implementing UN Security Council Resolution (UNSCR) 1325 and related EU instruments, pertaining to the area of women and armed conflict. It gives a general global overview of where the international community stands on implementing the 2000 UNSCR 1325 on women peace and security and subsequent relevant UNSCRs 1820, 1888 and 1889 and then an analysis of EU policies and structures devised to implement the UNSCRs and EU guidelines on human rights. In CSDP missions, substantial progress has been made in integrating gender in Joint Actions, but implementing 1325 in planning and fact-finding is still not automatic. Another strong advance is the increase in Gender and Human Rights Advisors – with there now being 34 across the current 13 missions. Work still needs to be done on strong Code of Conduct and dedicating budgets to the financing of mission activities on gender implementation. The study also concludes that the EU needs to continue to strengthen partnering and working with locals and local organisations (including in skills training) that fully understand and know how to work within their cultural and political constraints.

Autor extern

This study was written by Giji GYA, Executive Director, ISIS Europe (Brussels, BELGIUM) with the assistance of Sini CEDERCREUTZ, Senior Research Fellow, Francisco PENALVA, Programme Associate and Sebastian BLOCHING, Programme Officer at ISIS Europe. Updates assisted by Oana TOPALA, Programme Associate ISIS Europe.