17

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The Implementation of Enhanced Cooperation in the EU

01-10-2018

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the Committee on Constitutional Affairs, examines – against a historical backdrop – the legal provisions governing Enhanced Cooperation as well as the so far very limited number of implemented Enhanced Cooperation initiatives. Based on these insights, concrete ideas are formulated on how to optimise this ‘standardised and generalised framework’ of differentiated ...

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the Committee on Constitutional Affairs, examines – against a historical backdrop – the legal provisions governing Enhanced Cooperation as well as the so far very limited number of implemented Enhanced Cooperation initiatives. Based on these insights, concrete ideas are formulated on how to optimise this ‘standardised and generalised framework’ of differentiated integration, touching upon questions of efficacy, efficiency and legitimacy.

Autor extern

Prof. Dr. Wolfgang WESSELS, Centre for Turkey and European Union Studies (CETEUS), University of Cologne; Carsten GERARDS, Department of EU International Relations and Diplomacy Studies, College of Europe (Bruges)

Recast of the Brussels IIa Regulation

10-01-2018

On 21 November 2017, Parliament's Committee on Legal Affairs adopted its report on the Commission proposal for a recast Brussels IIa Regulation concerning the 'free movement' of judgments in non-patrimonial family matters. Since a special legislative procedure applies, the European Parliament is only consulted; it is expected to vote during its January plenary session.

On 21 November 2017, Parliament's Committee on Legal Affairs adopted its report on the Commission proposal for a recast Brussels IIa Regulation concerning the 'free movement' of judgments in non-patrimonial family matters. Since a special legislative procedure applies, the European Parliament is only consulted; it is expected to vote during its January plenary session.

CHILDREN ON THE MOVE: A PRIVATE INTERNATIONAL LAW PERSPECTIVE

13-06-2017

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the JURI Committee, will be presented during a Workshop dedicated to potential and challenges of private international law in the current migratory context. The child’s best interests are a primary consideration under international and EU law. EU migration and private international law frameworks regulate child protection, but in an uncoordinated way: the Dublin ...

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the JURI Committee, will be presented during a Workshop dedicated to potential and challenges of private international law in the current migratory context. The child’s best interests are a primary consideration under international and EU law. EU migration and private international law frameworks regulate child protection, but in an uncoordinated way: the Dublin III and Brussels IIa Regulations are neither aligned nor applied coherently. This should change. In particular, the rules and mechanisms of Brussels IIa should be used to enhance the protection of migrant children. These include rules on jurisdiction to take protective measures, on applicable law, and on recognition and enforcement of protective measures, and mechanisms for cross-border cooperation between authorities.

Autor extern

Sabine Corneloup; Bettina Heiderhoff; Costanza Honorati; Fabienne Jault-Seseke; Thalia Kruger; Caroline Rupp; Hans van Loon; Jinske Verhellen

Private international law in a context of increasing international mobility: challenges and potential

12-06-2017

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the JURI Committee, will be presented during a Workshop dedicated to potential and challenges of private international law in the current migratory context. While Private International Law governs private relations between persons coming from or living in different States, migration law regulates the flow of people between States. The demarcation between these ...

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the JURI Committee, will be presented during a Workshop dedicated to potential and challenges of private international law in the current migratory context. While Private International Law governs private relations between persons coming from or living in different States, migration law regulates the flow of people between States. The demarcation between these two areas of law seems clear, but in practice it is not. Rights related to migration are often linked to private relations (marriage, parentage) or personal status (age). The EU should have a coherent approach in these areas, both internally and in relations with third States. Authorities active in the different areas must coordinate their work.

Autor extern

Sabine Corneloup (coordinator), Professor at the University Paris II Panthéon-Assas, France, member of TEE Bettina Heiderhoff, Professor at the University of Münster, member of TEE Costanza Honorati, Professor at the University of Milano-Bicocca, member of TEE Fabienne Jault-Seseke (coordinator), Professor at the University of Versailles Saint-Quentin, France, member of TEE, member of GEDIP Thalia Kruger, Professor at the University of Antwerp, Belgium, member of TEE Caroline Rupp, Junior Professor at the Julius-Maximilians-University Würzburg, Germany, member of TEE Hans van Loon, Former Secretary General of the Hague Conference on Private International Law, member of GEDIP Jinske Verhellen (coordinator), Professor at the Ghent University, Belgium, member of TEE

The rights of LGBTI people in the European Union

12-05-2017

The prohibition of discrimination and the protection of human rights are important elements of the EU legal order. Nevertheless, discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) persons persists throughout the EU, taking various forms including verbal abuse and physical violence. Sexual orientation is now recognised in EU law as a ground of discrimination. However, the scope of these provisions is limited and does not cover social protection, healthcare, education and ...

The prohibition of discrimination and the protection of human rights are important elements of the EU legal order. Nevertheless, discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) persons persists throughout the EU, taking various forms including verbal abuse and physical violence. Sexual orientation is now recognised in EU law as a ground of discrimination. However, the scope of these provisions is limited and does not cover social protection, healthcare, education and access to goods and services, leaving LGBTI people particularly vulnerable in these areas. Moreover, EU competence does not extend to recognition of marital or family status. In this area, national regulations vary, with some Member States offering same-sex couples the right to marry, others allowing alternative forms of registration, and yet others not providing any legal status for same-sex couples. Same-sex couples may or may not have the right to adopt children and to access assisted reproduction. These divergent legal statuses have implications, for instance, for partners from two Member States with different standards who want to formalise/legalise their relationship or for same-sex couples and their families wishing to move to another Member State. Combating discrimination has become part of EU internal and external policies and the subject of numerous resolutions of the European Parliament. However, action in this area remains problematic when it touches on issues pertaining to areas traditionally reserved to Member States, such as marital status and family law. This is a further updated version of a briefing originally drafted by Piotr Bakowski. The previous edition was published in May 2016, PE 582.031.

Recasting the Brussels IIa Regulation - Workshop on 8 November 2016 - Compilation of Briefings

28-10-2016

The workshop, organised by the Policy Department upon request by the JURI Committee, takes place while the European Parliament is consulted on the Commission proposal to recast the so-called “Brussels IIa” Regulation 2201/2003 concerning jurisdiction and the recognition and enforcement of judgements in matrimonial matters and the matters of parental responsibility. The briefings included in this compilation examine the main amendments proposed by the Commission as regards child abduction and return ...

The workshop, organised by the Policy Department upon request by the JURI Committee, takes place while the European Parliament is consulted on the Commission proposal to recast the so-called “Brussels IIa” Regulation 2201/2003 concerning jurisdiction and the recognition and enforcement of judgements in matrimonial matters and the matters of parental responsibility. The briefings included in this compilation examine the main amendments proposed by the Commission as regards child abduction and return proceedings, mediation, cooperation between national judicial and central authorities, and suggest possible further improvements in these areas as well as in the field of jurisdiction over divorce and annulment of marriage, cooperation with third countries and international organisations, and training of judges.

Autor extern

Ilaria PRETELLI; Christoph C. PAUL; Nicole GALLUS; Thalia KRUGER; Lukáš FRIDRICH; Annette C. OLLAND; Permanent Bureau of the Hague Conference on Private International Law; Alegría BORRÁS and Wojciech POSTULSKI

Jurisdiction in Matrimonial Matters - Reflections for the Review of the Brussels IIa Regulation

30-06-2016

At the request of the European Parliament Committee on Legal Affairs (JURI), this research paper was commissioned by the Policy Department for Citizen's Rights and Constitutional Affairs to examine difficulties experienced in relation to jurisdiction in matrimonial matters, and assess the need for amendment of current legislation concerning party autonomy, transfers of jurisdiction and harmonisation of rules on residual jurisdiction. It concludes that there is a pressing need for reform insofar as ...

At the request of the European Parliament Committee on Legal Affairs (JURI), this research paper was commissioned by the Policy Department for Citizen's Rights and Constitutional Affairs to examine difficulties experienced in relation to jurisdiction in matrimonial matters, and assess the need for amendment of current legislation concerning party autonomy, transfers of jurisdiction and harmonisation of rules on residual jurisdiction. It concludes that there is a pressing need for reform insofar as transfers of jurisdiction are concerned, and a compelling case for the introduction of more party autonomy. The case for harmonisation of residual rules, however, is less clear. In the light of national case law and academic literature, the study also considers whether same-sex relationships could be governed by the Regulation and argues that there is a strong legal argument for their inclusion.

Rules on cross-border property regimes of spouses and registered partners

20-06-2016

In March 2016 the Commission proposed, in parallel, two regulations implementing enhanced cooperation on cross-border aspects of property regimes of marriages and registered partnerships. They replace a pair of earlier proposals from 2011, which lacked unanimous support in the Council.

In March 2016 the Commission proposed, in parallel, two regulations implementing enhanced cooperation on cross-border aspects of property regimes of marriages and registered partnerships. They replace a pair of earlier proposals from 2011, which lacked unanimous support in the Council.

Brussels IIa: Towards a Review (2) - Main Recommendations from External Experts to the European Parliament

08-06-2016

Applied since 2005 in all EU Member States except Denmark, Council Regulation (EC) No 2201/2003 (‘Brussels IIa’), has raised concerns among citizens, practitioners and academics. The European Parliament has received many recommendations for amendments from experts commissioned by the Policy Department for Citizen’s Rights and Constitutional Affairs. This briefing note presents a reasoned summary of these recommendations in view of the consultation of the EP on the recently published European Commission ...

Applied since 2005 in all EU Member States except Denmark, Council Regulation (EC) No 2201/2003 (‘Brussels IIa’), has raised concerns among citizens, practitioners and academics. The European Parliament has received many recommendations for amendments from experts commissioned by the Policy Department for Citizen’s Rights and Constitutional Affairs. This briefing note presents a reasoned summary of these recommendations in view of the consultation of the EP on the recently published European Commission “Proposal for a Council Regulation on jurisdiction, the recognition and enforcement of decisions in matrimonial matters and the matters of parental responsibility, and on international child abduction (recast)”. The recommendations do not represent the views of the European Parliament or the Policy Department, nor can they prejudge the position of the European Parliament.

The rights of LGBTI people in the European Union

17-05-2016

The prohibition of discrimination and the protection of human rights are important elements of the EU legal order. Nevertheless, discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) persons persists throughout the EU, taking various forms including verbal abuse and physical violence. Sexual orientation is now recognised in EU law as a ground of discrimination. However, the scope of these provisions is limited and does not cover social protection, healthcare, education and ...

The prohibition of discrimination and the protection of human rights are important elements of the EU legal order. Nevertheless, discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) persons persists throughout the EU, taking various forms including verbal abuse and physical violence. Sexual orientation is now recognised in EU law as a ground of discrimination. However, the scope of these provisions is limited and does not cover social protection, healthcare, education and access to goods and services, leaving LGBTI people particularly vulnerable in these areas. Moreover, EU competence does not extend to recognition of marital or family status. In this area, national regulations vary, with some Member States offering same-sex couples the right to marry, others allowing alternative forms of registration, and yet others not providing any legal status for same-sex couples. Same-sex couples may or may not have the right to adopt children and to access assisted reproduction. These divergent legal statuses have implications, for instance, for partners from two Member States with different standards who want to formalise/legalise their relationship or for same-sex couples and their families wishing to move to another Member State. Combating discrimination has become part of EU internal and external policies and the subject of numerous resolutions of the European Parliament. However, action in this area remains problematic when it touches on issues pertaining to areas traditionally reserved to Member States, such as marital status and family law. This is an updated version of a briefing published in May 2015.

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20-11-2019
Europe's Future: Where next for EU institutional Reform?
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