17

výsledok(-ky)

Slovo (slová)
Typ publikácie
Oblasť politiky
Kľúčové slovo
Dátum

The EU dairy sector: Main features, challenges and prospects

17-12-2018

The EU dairy sector is the second biggest agricultural sector in the EU, representing more than 12 % of total agricultural output. While milk is produced in all Member States, farm and herd sizes, yields and types of farming vary widely across Europe, from free-range farming in Alpine areas to large specialised dairy farms in the north-west and centre of Europe. In 2016, 157 million tonnes of milk were delivered to dairies, where raw milk is processed into fresh products such as cheese or butter. ...

The EU dairy sector is the second biggest agricultural sector in the EU, representing more than 12 % of total agricultural output. While milk is produced in all Member States, farm and herd sizes, yields and types of farming vary widely across Europe, from free-range farming in Alpine areas to large specialised dairy farms in the north-west and centre of Europe. In 2016, 157 million tonnes of milk were delivered to dairies, where raw milk is processed into fresh products such as cheese or butter. Part of the common agricultural policy, the EU's dairy policy consists of a range of instruments designed to support farmers and address market imbalances. In particular, it includes common market organisation, public intervention and private storage provisions, direct payments and rural development measures. The policy has been constantly updated over time, one recent development being the suppression of milk quotas in 2015. The 2014 to 2016 crisis, during which raw milk prices dropped dramatically from around 40 to 25.7 cents per litre, triggered a reaction by the Commission based on public intervention-buying, private storage and a range of exceptional measures. Two aid packages were adopted, including incentives for farmers to reduce production. Recovery was in sight by 2017. In the coming years, growing EU and global demand is expected to support world dairy markets, without hindering price fluctuations and market imbalances. Resilience and sustainability are key words for the future of the sector. This can be achieved with innovation, as a way to reconcile the need for farmers to earn a decent living, consumer demand for affordable and quality dairy products, and environmental/animal health requirements.

EYE event - Urban-rural divide: Blame it all on my roots...

16-05-2018

From the remote Scottish islands to the Danube Delta in Romania, via the Alps, rural Europe shows sharply contrasting landscapes and climates as well as manifest economic and demographic differences. Rural reality in Europe is complex: statistics highlight general trends, showing not only that many rural areas suffer from a number of socio-economic issues, but also that they have many assets, not least dynamic stakeholders and local communities, and the potential to help address critical societal ...

From the remote Scottish islands to the Danube Delta in Romania, via the Alps, rural Europe shows sharply contrasting landscapes and climates as well as manifest economic and demographic differences. Rural reality in Europe is complex: statistics highlight general trends, showing not only that many rural areas suffer from a number of socio-economic issues, but also that they have many assets, not least dynamic stakeholders and local communities, and the potential to help address critical societal challenges. Dedicated EU policies and tools provide rural players with support as they strive to achieve balanced territorial development and harness the full potential of rural territories.

Agricultural education and lifelong training in the EU

24-10-2017

European farmers fulfil a vital role in providing safe and affordable food to nearly 500 million European citizens, and maintaining their countries' landscapes. However, the farming population is ageing and generational renewal has become a crucial issue. The farming sector needs to attract a new generation of farmers with the necessary skills to live and work in a challenging context. They will have to produce more efficiently while protecting the environment; contribute to the fight against climate ...

European farmers fulfil a vital role in providing safe and affordable food to nearly 500 million European citizens, and maintaining their countries' landscapes. However, the farming population is ageing and generational renewal has become a crucial issue. The farming sector needs to attract a new generation of farmers with the necessary skills to live and work in a challenging context. They will have to produce more efficiently while protecting the environment; contribute to the fight against climate change; meet society's demands regarding healthy and balanced diets; and keep up with increasingly rapid scientific and technological progress. It is therefore essential that farmers benefit from adequate agricultural education and training and acquire the various skills needed to adapt to a changing environment. On average, only 8.5 % of the present generation of European farmers have received full agricultural training, and 70 % have only practical experience. Initial training is a national competence and agricultural education systems vary widely throughout the EU. They provide the path to a wide range of careers in agriculture and forestry and deliver degrees in a number of disciplines, from diploma courses with a vocational orientation to bachelor degrees or doctorates in applied sciences. The current common agricultural policy places strong emphasis on knowledge sharing and innovation. It provides for specific measures to help farmers access advice and training throughout their working lives. Support is also provided for innovation via the European innovation partnership network for agricultural productivity and sustainability (EIP-Agri). In several recent resolutions, the European Parliament has stressed the importance of education and training for farmers, in particular as a way to foster their ability to work in an ever-evolving sector.

Rural poverty in the European Union

13-03-2017

In 2015, 119 million European citizens, representing almost a quarter of the EU population, were at risk of poverty and social exclusion. Statistics show that the average poverty rate is slightly higher in rural areas, with very contrasting situations across the Union as some countries display a huge poverty gap between rural and urban areas. Rural poverty, which appears to be less documented than urban poverty, is linked to the specific disadvantages of rural areas. These include an unfavourable ...

In 2015, 119 million European citizens, representing almost a quarter of the EU population, were at risk of poverty and social exclusion. Statistics show that the average poverty rate is slightly higher in rural areas, with very contrasting situations across the Union as some countries display a huge poverty gap between rural and urban areas. Rural poverty, which appears to be less documented than urban poverty, is linked to the specific disadvantages of rural areas. These include an unfavourable demographic situation, a weaker labour market, limited access to education and also remoteness and rural isolation. The latter is associated with a lack of basic services such as healthcare and social services, and with increased costs for inhabitants on account of travel distances. These factors are considered to be the main drivers of rural poverty. Through their interaction, they can generate a spiral of decline in which poverty can become entrenched. While the fight against poverty and social exclusion lies primarily within the remit of the Member States and their regions, this issue is at the heart of the Europe 2020 strategy for smart, sustainable and inclusive growth. Several EU funds and policies can contribute to alleviating poverty, in particular the current EU rural development policy which, for the first time, includes a priority relating to the promotion of social inclusion, poverty reduction and economic development in rural areas. Within this policy, Member States and regions can use EU funding to implement measures that, although not directly targeting poverty reduction, may help tackle those drivers of poverty in many ways, such as fostering job creation, improving services, developing infrastructure for information and communications technologies (ICT), and enhancing access to education. In this regard, local strategies such as the Leader method are particularly suited to supporting disadvantaged groups.

Climate-friendly forest management in the EU

16-12-2016

Forests are highly sensitive to climate change and, in particular, the rise in average global temperatures caused by man-made greenhouse gas emissions. They are also part of the solution, as they absorb and stock carbon as biomass through photosynthesis. Their potential to help mitigate climate change makes forests a central element of current international and European climate policies. In July 2016, the European Commission presented a proposal for integrating emissions and carbon gas removals from ...

Forests are highly sensitive to climate change and, in particular, the rise in average global temperatures caused by man-made greenhouse gas emissions. They are also part of the solution, as they absorb and stock carbon as biomass through photosynthesis. Their potential to help mitigate climate change makes forests a central element of current international and European climate policies. In July 2016, the European Commission presented a proposal for integrating emissions and carbon gas removals from land-use and forestry in the European Union climate and energy framework for 2030. In contrast to the global situation, total forest area is growing in the European Union, covering 41 % of the total land area. The forestry sector is an important source of employment and diversification in EU rural areas. The demand for wood is expected to increase as it presents many environmental benefits, such as a replacement for fossil fuels or carbon-intensive materials. In a complex international and European policy environment, the European Union forest strategy, published by the European Commission in 2013, seeks to provide Member States with a coherent framework supporting sustainable forest management. The main European instrument for implementation is the European agricultural fund for rural development. This co-finances forest-related measures, including those specifically targeting climate change mitigation such as afforestation or the establishment of agroforestry systems. More than €8 billion in public expenditure has been earmarked for such measures in the current 2014-2020 programming period.

The CAP and job creation in rural areas

19-10-2016

Many of the EU's rural areas are facing serious economic and demographic challenges, and the number of farmers has decreased drastically over the last few decades. As discussions have already begun on possible ways to reform the current common agricultural policy (CAP), an own-initiative report on the policy's role in creating jobs in rural areas is due to be debated and voted at the European Parliament's second October plenary session.

Many of the EU's rural areas are facing serious economic and demographic challenges, and the number of farmers has decreased drastically over the last few decades. As discussions have already begun on possible ways to reform the current common agricultural policy (CAP), an own-initiative report on the policy's role in creating jobs in rural areas is due to be debated and voted at the European Parliament's second October plenary session.

Short food supply chains and local food systems in the EU

02-09-2016

In recent times, short food supply chains and local markets, where farmers sell their produce directly to consumers or with a minimum of intermediaries, have flourished in all EU countries, both in rural and urban areas. They represent an alternative to conventional longer food chains where small farmers often have little bargaining power and the consumer cannot trace the food to a known producer or local area. On average, 15% of EU farms sell more than half of their production directly to consumers ...

In recent times, short food supply chains and local markets, where farmers sell their produce directly to consumers or with a minimum of intermediaries, have flourished in all EU countries, both in rural and urban areas. They represent an alternative to conventional longer food chains where small farmers often have little bargaining power and the consumer cannot trace the food to a known producer or local area. On average, 15% of EU farms sell more than half of their production directly to consumers. From producers’ markets to basket delivery systems or community-supported agriculture, there is a great diversity of short food supply chains and local food systems in the EU. Their advantages include a fairer price for farmers, access to fresh and seasonal produce for consumers, a reduced environmental impact and greater social cohesion at local level. Local economies also benefit from such schemes, which have the potential to create jobs. The current EU rural development policy 2014-2020 puts more emphasis than before on short food supply chains and defines them precisely for the first time. Producers wishing to involve themselves in local food systems can benefit from several measures co-financed by the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development. In 2015, research was conducted within the agricultural European Innovation Partnership on the possibility to develop those systems in order to improve farmers’ incomes. In several recent resolutions, the European Parliament has also expressed its support for short food supply chains and local markets, as a way to ensure a fair price for producers and reconnect food products with their locality of origin.

Common Agricultural Policy – Pillar II

13-07-2016

The Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) concerns the pooling of European Union resources spent on agriculture and aimed at protecting the viable production of food, the sustainable management of natural resources and a living countryside. Nearly 38% of the EU budget is spent on the CAP. Under the 2014-2020 Multiannual Financial Framework €408.31 billion is earmarked for the CAP, of which €99.6 billion is allocated to the second pillar. The second pillar of the CAP budget is financed under the European ...

The Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) concerns the pooling of European Union resources spent on agriculture and aimed at protecting the viable production of food, the sustainable management of natural resources and a living countryside. Nearly 38% of the EU budget is spent on the CAP. Under the 2014-2020 Multiannual Financial Framework €408.31 billion is earmarked for the CAP, of which €99.6 billion is allocated to the second pillar. The second pillar of the CAP budget is financed under the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development (EAFRD). The EAFRD is aimed at achieving the balanced territorial development of rural economies and at sustaining a farming sector that is environmentally sound as well as competitive and innovative.

Technological solutions for sustainable agriculture

02-06-2016

An own-initiative report on technological solutions for sustainable agriculture is due to be debated and voted at the June I plenary session. In the context of climate change, rising food demand resulting from global population growth and threats to the environment, the report suggests that innovation in agricultural technology is key to meeting some of the biggest challenges faced by farming today.

An own-initiative report on technological solutions for sustainable agriculture is due to be debated and voted at the June I plenary session. In the context of climate change, rising food demand resulting from global population growth and threats to the environment, the report suggests that innovation in agricultural technology is key to meeting some of the biggest challenges faced by farming today.

Farm diversification in the EU

25-04-2016

Many European farmers are struggling to make a living in a difficult economic context of falling prices in key agricultural commodities and high agricultural market volatility. For many, a way to stabilise or increase their income is to branch out into other non agricultural activities, using farm facilities. From tourist accommodation to the production of renewable energies or the sale of handicrafts, a wide range of diversified activities can be implemented on the farm itself. The situation is ...

Many European farmers are struggling to make a living in a difficult economic context of falling prices in key agricultural commodities and high agricultural market volatility. For many, a way to stabilise or increase their income is to branch out into other non agricultural activities, using farm facilities. From tourist accommodation to the production of renewable energies or the sale of handicrafts, a wide range of diversified activities can be implemented on the farm itself. The situation is fairly contrasted across the EU as regards diversification, which is quite common in some Member States and almost inexistent in others. EU rural development policy supports farmers setting up other activities on their farms as part of a more general objective of maintaining a strong farming sector in Europe, which is a necessary condition for the development of rural economies. Farmers wishing to set up diversification activities can benefit from start-up aid of maximum €70 000 from the rural development fund (EAFRD), with co-financing from their Member State, or from another type of aid in the form of support for investments. At this stage of the current programming period (2014-2020), Member States’ rural development programmes, indicating how they intend to spend their rural development envelopes, have all been adopted. According to the European Commission, countries and regions have allocated 7.4% on average of total public expenditure to the measure dedicated to farm and business development, which includes, inter alia, support for farm diversification.

Nadchádzajúce podujatia

Partneri

Buďte v obraze

email update imageSystém odberu aktuálnych informácií prostredníctvom e-mailu

Systém odberu aktualizácií prostredníctvom e-mailu, ktorý priamo posiela najnovšie informácie na vašu elektronickú adresu, vám umožňuje sledovať všetky osoby a udalosti spojené s Parlamentom. Súčasťou tohto systému sú najnovšie informácie o poslancoch, informačné služby alebo stránka Think Tank.

Systém je dostupný všade na stránkach Parlamentu. Na objednanie a prijímanie oznámení zo stránky Think Tank stačí, ak poskytnete vašu e-mailovú adresu, vyberiete tému, ktorá vás zaujíma, uvediete periodicitu (denne, týždenne alebo mesačne) a potvrdíte vašu registráciu kliknutím na internetový odkaz odoslaný e-mailom.

RSS imageKanály RSS

Nezmeškajte žiadnu informáciu alebo aktualizáciu stránky Európskeho parlamentu vďaka nášmu kanálu RSS.

Na nastavenie vášho kanálu kliknite na tento odkaz.