The Future of Europe [What Think Tanks are thinking]

20-04-2018

The tone of the debate on the Future of Europe and possible institutional reforms of the European Union has shifted from gloomy to more optimistic, thanks to a developing economic recovery, the easing of the migration crisis, the failure of anti-EU forces to make decisive gains in some recent elections, and the general progress of the Brexit talks. Still, many analysts and politicians warn against complacency, as anti-establishment political parties continue to gain traction with some voters, as concerns grow over the rule of law in some EU countries, and as the policies of, and relations between, the United States and Russia have become less predictable. There is also no agreement on how to overhaul the euro area to minimise the risk of a repeat of the 2008 crisis and to strengthen economic growth. This debate on the Future of Europe is set to intensify ahead of the 2019 European elections, the installation of the new Presidents of the European Commission and European Council, and the end of the EU’s current long-term budget in 2021. This note offers links to commentaries, studies and reports from major international think tanks on the state of the EU and possible reforms. Brexit-related publications can be found in a previous edition of ‘What Think Tanks are thinking.’ Earlier papers on the general state of the EU are available in another edition in this series, published in September 2017. More reports on euro zone reforms are also gathered in another in the series, from December 2017.

The tone of the debate on the Future of Europe and possible institutional reforms of the European Union has shifted from gloomy to more optimistic, thanks to a developing economic recovery, the easing of the migration crisis, the failure of anti-EU forces to make decisive gains in some recent elections, and the general progress of the Brexit talks. Still, many analysts and politicians warn against complacency, as anti-establishment political parties continue to gain traction with some voters, as concerns grow over the rule of law in some EU countries, and as the policies of, and relations between, the United States and Russia have become less predictable. There is also no agreement on how to overhaul the euro area to minimise the risk of a repeat of the 2008 crisis and to strengthen economic growth. This debate on the Future of Europe is set to intensify ahead of the 2019 European elections, the installation of the new Presidents of the European Commission and European Council, and the end of the EU’s current long-term budget in 2021. This note offers links to commentaries, studies and reports from major international think tanks on the state of the EU and possible reforms. Brexit-related publications can be found in a previous edition of ‘What Think Tanks are thinking.’ Earlier papers on the general state of the EU are available in another edition in this series, published in September 2017. More reports on euro zone reforms are also gathered in another in the series, from December 2017.