8

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Revision of the European Electronic Tolling Service (EETS) Directive

25-04-2019

On 31 May 2017, the Commission adopted a proposal for a directive on the interoperability of electronic road toll systems and facilitating cross-border exchange of information on the failure to pay road fees in the Union. It was presented within the context of the Commission's first 'Europe on the Move' package that seeks to modernise mobility and transport. Tying in with the 2015 energy union strategy and the Commission's 2016 European strategy for low emission mobility, and announced in the 2017 ...

On 31 May 2017, the Commission adopted a proposal for a directive on the interoperability of electronic road toll systems and facilitating cross-border exchange of information on the failure to pay road fees in the Union. It was presented within the context of the Commission's first 'Europe on the Move' package that seeks to modernise mobility and transport. Tying in with the 2015 energy union strategy and the Commission's 2016 European strategy for low emission mobility, and announced in the 2017 Commission work programme, the revision of the European Electronic Tolling Service (EETS) was presented together with the revision of the directive on the charging of heavy goods vehicles for the use of certain infrastructures (the Eurovignette Directive). Interinstitutional (trilogue) negotiations concluded on 20 November 2018. The agreed text was formally adopted by Parliament on 14 February 2019 and by Council on 4 March 2019. The final act was then published in the Official Journal on 29 March 2019. Member States now have until 19 October 2021 to apply the directive’s measures in their national laws.

Revision of the Eurovignette Directive

17-10-2018

The Commission adopted a legislative proposal for a directive amending Directive 1999/62/EC on the charging of heavy goods vehicles for the use of certain infrastructures (known as the Eurovignette Directive) in May 2017. The initiative is linked to two wider strategies, the energy union strategy, which inter alia envisaged a road transport package, including more efficient infrastructure pricing, and the Commission’s strategy for low-emission mobility. The proposal was presented within the context ...

The Commission adopted a legislative proposal for a directive amending Directive 1999/62/EC on the charging of heavy goods vehicles for the use of certain infrastructures (known as the Eurovignette Directive) in May 2017. The initiative is linked to two wider strategies, the energy union strategy, which inter alia envisaged a road transport package, including more efficient infrastructure pricing, and the Commission’s strategy for low-emission mobility. The proposal was presented within the context of the Commission’s ‘Europe on the move’ package that seeks to modernise mobility and transport and includes several legislative proposals. The objective of the Eurovignette proposal, which substantially amends the existing legislation by extending the scope of vehicles covered, is to make progress in the application of the ‘polluter pays’ and ‘user pays’ principles. Second edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

New ways of financing transport infrastructure projects in Europe

01-03-2018

This study assesses a range of mechanisms to finance transport infrastructure projects in cross-border regions, and analyses the strategic role that European Groupings of Territorial Cohesion (EGTC) could play in the planning and implementation of cross-border investments. Special attention is given to often neglected small-scale projects, whose investment is up to €1 million. Building on an in-depth literature review, and supported by interviews with various regional cooperation structures and an ...

This study assesses a range of mechanisms to finance transport infrastructure projects in cross-border regions, and analyses the strategic role that European Groupings of Territorial Cohesion (EGTC) could play in the planning and implementation of cross-border investments. Special attention is given to often neglected small-scale projects, whose investment is up to €1 million. Building on an in-depth literature review, and supported by interviews with various regional cooperation structures and an experts’ workshop, the study analyses the current situation regarding the availability of financing tools for new technologies that enhance transport infrastructure in cross-border regions. It also outlines sources of financial support that could meet investment needs and assesses technological challenges and trends in the field of Intelligent Transport Systems, with a focus on regional interoperability. The study ends with suggestions of policy options to facilitate and accelerate cross border transport infrastructure projects.

Zunanji avtor

EPRS, DG;

Revision of the European Electronic Road Toll Service

12-10-2017

This note seeks to provide an initial analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission's impact assessment (IA) accompanying the above proposal, submitted on 31 May 2017 and referred to Parliament's Committee on Transport and Tourism. Digitisation and connectivity allow tolling without the user having to stop at toll barriers. Electronic tolls are levied by electronic systems that charge passing vehicles at a control point or across the infrastructure network. The vast majority ...

This note seeks to provide an initial analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission's impact assessment (IA) accompanying the above proposal, submitted on 31 May 2017 and referred to Parliament's Committee on Transport and Tourism. Digitisation and connectivity allow tolling without the user having to stop at toll barriers. Electronic tolls are levied by electronic systems that charge passing vehicles at a control point or across the infrastructure network. The vast majority require road users to install special equipment – on-board units (OBU) – for which technologies and standards may differ from one Member State to the next. For that reason, Directive 2004/52/EC on interoperability established the framework for a European Electronic Toll Service (EETS), in accordance with which road users could subscribe to a single contract and use a single OBU to pay electronic tolls throughout the EU. The detailed technical issues connected with the directive were set out in Commission Decision 2009/750/EC on the definition of the EETS and its technical elements. The EETS should have been operational for heavy goods vehicles by October 2012 and for other vehicles by October 2014, but the objectives of the legislation remain largely unattained. Some cross-border interoperability has been achieved, but in the majority of Member States it is still the case that only national OBUs can be used to pay tolls. The European Parliament has called for the Commission to consider appropriate legislative measures in the field of interoperability on several occasions, for instance in its 2013 and 2015 resolutions. In 2015, the Commission announced an evaluation of EETS legislation, which was concluded in 2017 with the publishing of the ex-post evaluation report. The Commission included the regulatory fitness (REFIT) revision of Directive 2004/52/EC in its 2017 work programme (CWP) under the new initiatives implementing the energy union strategy and included the initiative in the European strategy for low-emission mobility. Initially, EU road-pricing initiatives, such as the EETS Interoperability Directive and 'Eurovignette' Directive 1999/62/EC on the charging of heavy goods vehicles for the use of certain infrastructure, were not focused on contributing to reducing greenhouse gas emissions, but with time, this aspect has become more important. The Commission presented its revision of the EETS Interoperability Directive in parallel with the proposal to revise the Eurovignette Directive.

The Eurovignette and the framework to promote a European electronic toll service (EETS)

06-03-2017

The various reports and assessments show that there are considerable differences in the way vehicle road charges have been implemented across Member States. This means that a fully integrated market is yet to be reached. This is partly due to the flexibility contained in the various legislations which allowed Member States to apply systems that first and foremost fitted with their needs. As transport policy has increasingly become more interlinked with reducing emissions, these differences have become ...

The various reports and assessments show that there are considerable differences in the way vehicle road charges have been implemented across Member States. This means that a fully integrated market is yet to be reached. This is partly due to the flexibility contained in the various legislations which allowed Member States to apply systems that first and foremost fitted with their needs. As transport policy has increasingly become more interlinked with reducing emissions, these differences have become more problematic. The available evidence shows that there are qualitative differences between the road charging systems with distance-based charges being the most effective option. Indeed, it is clear that a move towards this system has been happening for some time now, and that road charges generally vary depending on emissions. The reviews did not find evidence of discrimination against any HGV users. In the area of electronic tolling, substantial variations can also be found. While dedicated short-range communications (DSRC) is the most used system, significant challenges around inter-operability remain. In fact some argue that none of the current systems in use under EETS will increase operability. Technological advances are nevertheless making harmonising these services easier. Although some argue that the gradual harmonisation seen to date has more to do with new technologies than with EU legislation. While a harmonised system is important for the internal market, road charges have also become closely linked with the reduction in emissions according to the 'polluter pay' principle. Following that logic, it would be difficult not to consider road charges for all vehicles. Especially since passenger car emissions make up a higher proportion of GHG emissions than HGVs. Indeed, the Commission's consultation on the topic confirms that wide ranging options are being considered. A broader scope raises more challenges, and as road charges get more sophisticated, i.e. time-based for example, more care needs to be taken that rates do not discriminate against some road users, in particular non-nationals. However, road charges currently make up only a very small proportion of the total costs for the transport sector, which means that behavioural changes solely based on these charges are likely to be limited. To significantly reduce transport emissions, much broader actions will be required.

Road charges for private vehicles in the EU

25-05-2016

Road charges are fees for the use of a particular road network or section of road. Since the 1990s, the focus of European transport policy has shifted from the application of road pricing purely as a means to generate revenue towards the use of charges as an instrument against pollution and congestion. Charging for road infrastructure is an option to implement basic principles of EU policy such as the 'user-pays principle' or the 'polluter-pays principle'. It can serve different functions such as ...

Road charges are fees for the use of a particular road network or section of road. Since the 1990s, the focus of European transport policy has shifted from the application of road pricing purely as a means to generate revenue towards the use of charges as an instrument against pollution and congestion. Charging for road infrastructure is an option to implement basic principles of EU policy such as the 'user-pays principle' or the 'polluter-pays principle'. It can serve different functions such as financing, managing traffic flow or making all costs perceptible so as to influence the behaviour of road users. As the transport of goods is linked with the functioning of the Single Market, the charging of heavy goods vehicles is regulated at European level. In contrast, there is no regulation at European level on the road charging of private vehicles, though Member States establishing such schemes are obliged to apply the basic principles of the Treaties, in particular the principles of proportionality and of non-discrimination on grounds of nationality. As a consequence of the regulation at national level, many different charging schemes are applied in the EU. These vary, principally according to the way they are levied: distance-based schemes levied by means of tolls, or time-based schemes, levied using vignettes. All schemes are associated with considerable levying costs. Technological developments such as electronic charging can offer opportunities to reduce these costs. However, lack of interoperability between the various systems generates additional costs and hindrances for European mobility.

Evropsko elektronsko cestninjenje

15-04-2014

Namen študije je ponuditi pregled sedanjih in prihodnjih tehnoloških možnosti za evropsko elektronsko cestninjenje. V študiji so obravnavane prednosti in slabosti vsake izmed šestih tehnologij, ki so sedaj v uporabi. Vsebuje tudi oceno tekočega tehnološkega razvoja in poti naprej za Evropsko unijo.

Namen študije je ponuditi pregled sedanjih in prihodnjih tehnoloških možnosti za evropsko elektronsko cestninjenje. V študiji so obravnavane prednosti in slabosti vsake izmed šestih tehnologij, ki so sedaj v uporabi. Vsebuje tudi oceno tekočega tehnološkega razvoja in poti naprej za Evropsko unijo.

Zunanji avtor

Francesco Dionori, Lucia Manzi and Roberta Frisoni (Steer Davies Gleave) ; José Manuel Vassallo, Juan Gómez Sánchez and Leticia Orozco Rendueles (Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain) ; José Luis Pérez Iturriaga ; Nick Patchett (Pillar Strategy)

Electronic Toll Service and road charging

06-06-2013

The maintenance and development of road infrastructure, allowing for smooth mobility of persons and goods, is essential for the internal market. Tolls are increasingly used but existing toll systems are often mutually incompatible, leading to delays. Moreover, public investment in inland transport has been decreasing for years.

The maintenance and development of road infrastructure, allowing for smooth mobility of persons and goods, is essential for the internal market. Tolls are increasingly used but existing toll systems are often mutually incompatible, leading to delays. Moreover, public investment in inland transport has been decreasing for years.

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