3

resultat

Ord
Publikationstyp
Politikområde
Författare
Sökord
Datum

Regulating imports of cultural goods

28-06-2019

Until now, with the exception of two specific measures for Iraq and Syria, there has been no EU legislation covering the import of cultural goods from non-EU countries entering the EU. By ensuring that these imports are subject to uniform controls along all EU external borders, the new regulation aims to prevent the introduction, import and storage in the EU of cultural goods illegally removed from a third country, thereby protecting cultural heritage and combatting illegal trade, in particular where ...

Until now, with the exception of two specific measures for Iraq and Syria, there has been no EU legislation covering the import of cultural goods from non-EU countries entering the EU. By ensuring that these imports are subject to uniform controls along all EU external borders, the new regulation aims to prevent the introduction, import and storage in the EU of cultural goods illegally removed from a third country, thereby protecting cultural heritage and combatting illegal trade, in particular where it may serve as an income source for terrorist groups. Both Parliament and Council agreed positions on the Commission’ proposal in autumn 2018, and reached an agreement in trilogue negotiations in December that year. Adopted by both institutions in spring 2019, the new regulation lays down the conditions for the introduction, as well as the conditions and procedures for the import, of cultural goods from third countries. The regulation does not apply to cultural goods that have been created or discovered in the EU. To focus the measures established by the regulation on the goods considered most at risk of pillage in conflict areas and to avoid a disproportionate burden for licit trade, the new legislative act introduces age and value thresholds for certain goods categories. The regulation will apply at the latest six years after it comes into force, i.e. from June 2025. Third edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Import of cultural goods

19-12-2017

This note seeks to provide an initial analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission's impact assessment (IA) accompanying the above proposal, adopted on 13 July 2017 and now under discussion in Parliament and Council. The proposal aims to prevent the import and storage in the EU of cultural goods illicitly exported from a third country, in order to reduce trafficking in cultural goods, combat terrorism financing and protect cultural heritage, especially archaeological objects ...

This note seeks to provide an initial analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission's impact assessment (IA) accompanying the above proposal, adopted on 13 July 2017 and now under discussion in Parliament and Council. The proposal aims to prevent the import and storage in the EU of cultural goods illicitly exported from a third country, in order to reduce trafficking in cultural goods, combat terrorism financing and protect cultural heritage, especially archaeological objects in source countries affected by armed conflict (explanatory memorandum of the proposal, p. 3). The market for antiques, ancient art and collectibles of older age constitutes 24 % of the global legal art and antiques market. The European market share accounts for 35 % of this global market, with the UK in the lead with 24 % (due to its large auction houses), followed by Switzerland (6 %), France (5 %), Germany (3 %), and Austria, Spain and the Netherlands (each around 0.5% respectively). Based on Eurostat figures, the estimated annual value of imports of classical antiquities and ancient art declared to EU customs may be around €3.7 billion per year (IA, p. 10). The IA explains that the current Common Nomenclature tariff heading (9705) used for import of antiquities and ancient art objects is rather broad, including also a variety of other goods of interest to collectors, making it difficult to estimate the total EU imports of cultural goods (IA, p. 10). Regarding the illicit trade of cultural goods, there are numerous underlying factors, which cannot be changed by this initiative, according to the IA (p. 11). These include, for example, poverty and military conflicts prevalent in many regions rich in cultural heritage sites, technological progress in various digging tools (such as metal-detectors, power drills, explosives), the market demand for such objects, mostly concentrated in Europe and North America, as well as cross-border transaction and e-commerce (IA, pp. 11-12). Estimates show that 80-90 % of global antiquities sales are of goods with illicit origin, and these sales are worth US$3 to 6 billion annually (IA, p. 12). The illicit sales of cultural goods often stem from terrorist activities and serve as a means to finance terrorism (IA, p. 14). For example, the Islamist profit from illicit trade in antiquities and archaeological treasures is estimated at US$150-200 million (IA, p. 15).

Minerals from conflict areas: Existing and new responsible‐sourcing initiatives

11-02-2014

The example of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) demonstrates how mineral extraction in developing countries may fuel or aggravate internal armed conflicts characterised by extreme levels of violence. In an effort to sever the linkage between mineral extraction and conflict finance, the UN and the OECD have developed guidelines for companies sourcing minerals from conflict areas. While the US has introduced legally binding requirements for corporations, the EU has yet to enact similar legislation ...

The example of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) demonstrates how mineral extraction in developing countries may fuel or aggravate internal armed conflicts characterised by extreme levels of violence. In an effort to sever the linkage between mineral extraction and conflict finance, the UN and the OECD have developed guidelines for companies sourcing minerals from conflict areas. While the US has introduced legally binding requirements for corporations, the EU has yet to enact similar legislation despite calls from the European Parliament and others.

Kommande evenemang

28-01-2020
Western Balkans: A rocky road to enlargement
Övrigt -
EPRS
29-01-2020
Where all students can succeed: Analysing the latest OECD PISA results
Övrigt -
EPRS
29-01-2020
The Future of Artificial Intelligence for Europe
Seminarium -
STOA

Partner

Håll dig informerad

email update imageE-postuppdateringar

Du kan följa vem eller vad som helst som har med parlamentet att göra med hjälp av systemet med e-postuppdateringar, som ger dig uppdateringar direkt till din inbox. Bl.a. kan du få senaste nytt från ledamöterna, nyhetstjänsterna eller Think Tank.

Du kommer åt systemet från alla sidor på parlamentets webbplats. Vill du anmäla dig och börja ta emot uppdateringarna från Think Tank anger du bara din e-post, vad du är intresserad av och hur ofta du vill få notiserna (varje dag, vecka eller månad) och bekräftar sedan genom att klicka på den länk som skickas till dig i bekräftelsemejlet.

RSS imageRSS-flöden

Följ alla nyheter och uppdateringar på Europaparlamentets webbplats med våra RSS-flöden.

Klicka på länken nedan för att konfigurera dina flöden.