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EU External Relations Law and Policy in the post-Lisbon Era - Public Conference

Event Start: 13/01/2011 (All day)
Event End: 14/01/2011 (All day)  

Location: University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

EU External Relations Law and Policy in the post-Lisbon Era

The External Relations of the EU was one of the key areas of focus in the Treaty of Lisbon as the EU continues to find its place in the global order. The continued search for an international role for the EU has led to significant (and ongoing) institutional changes, perhaps most visibly with regards to the role of the High Representative for the CFSP. However, fundamental questions remain as to whether the EU's institutional architecture is capable of fulfilling the goals set out in the Treaty and how provisions are translated to the actual operation of EU policy in the external sphere. Shifts in the 'internal' direction of the governance of the EU, as exemplified by the focus on a 'secure Europe' in the Stockholm Programme, have an increasingly strong effect on external relations too. Within the context of European and global economic uncertainty, the economic and commercial external relations of the enlarged EU face new challenges. Tied to all these aspects of the Union's external relations are the strengthened obligations to act consistently and coherently within the sphere of external relations. Consideration of the workings of the External Relations of the EU from legal, political and other perspectives is therefore of increasing relevance. How are the new institutional arrangements taking shape? What are the challenges, difficulties and opportunities created by the Treaty of Lisbon for the EU's institutional and constitutional arrangements? How are the arrangements being translated to the practice of external relations outside the EU? How are the different dimensions (e.g. common commercial policy, CFSP) to the EU's external relations evolving? Is increased consistency and coherency across the EU's external relations possible? How do theories of European integration, International Relations and legal theory inform our understanding of EU External Relations post-Lisbon? These questions will provide the basis of an interdisciplinary two-day conference to be held at the University of Sheffield in January 2011. Papers are invited which address any of the questions above.

For more information, contact:

Paul James Cardwell