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LUX Film Prize Cinema Screenings 2016

London, 14-17 November 2016 at The Barbican Centre

Leeds, 16-18 November 2016 at the Leeds International Film Festival

The official selection of the European Parliament's film prize, the LUX Prize 2016, is: 'As I Open My Eyes' by Leyla Bouzid; 'My Life as a Courgette' by Claude Barras and 'Toni Erdmann' by Maren Ade. Every year the LUX Film Days bring the 3 finalist films to more than 40 cities across the 28 EU Member States. Each film is subtitled in the 24 official languages of the EU. Join us between the 14th-18th November in London and Leeds for the screenings of the LUX Prize 2016 finalists.

Tickets are allocated on a first come, first served basis. Registration is essential.

The hashtag for this event is #LUXPrize.

London Screenings

Register for the London screenings on the Barbican website

Julie Ward MEP, member of the European Parliament's Committee on Culture and Education, will be introducing the film on 15th November in London.

Leeds Screenings

Register for the Leeds screenings on the Leeds International Film Festival website
 

Introducing the LUX Prize Finalists 2016

Films selected for the LUX Film Prize competition celebrate the universal reach of European values, illustrate the diversity of European traditions and shed light on the process of European integration. Read the synopses and watch the trailers to find out more about this year's finalists.

As I Open My Eyes

Leyla Bouzid (France/ Tunisia/ Belgium/ United Arab Emirates) 2016

Synopsis: Tunis, summer 2010, a few months before the Revolution: Farah, 18 years-old, has just graduated and her family already sees her as a future doctor. But she doesn’t think the same way. She sings in a political rock band. She has a passion for life, gets drunk, discovers love and her city by night against the will of her mother Hayet, who knows Tunisia and its dangers too well.

As I Open My Eyes
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My Life as a Courgette

Claude Barras (Switzerland/ France) 2016

Synopsis: Zucchini is an intriguing nickname for a 9 year old boy. Although his unique story is surprisingly universal. After his mother’s sudden death, Zucchini is befriended by a kind police officer Raymond, who accompanies Zucchini to his new foster home filled with other orphans his age. At first Zucchini struggles to find his place in this strange, at times, hostile environment. Yet with Raymond’s help and his new found friends, Zucchini eventually learns to trust, finds true love and at last a new family of his own.

My Life as a Courgette
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Toni Erdmann

Maren Ade (Germany/ Austria/ Romania) 2016

Synopsis: Winfried doesn’t see much of his working daughter Ines. The suddenly student-less music teacher decides to surprise her with a visit after the death of his old dog. It’s an awkward move because serious career woman Ines is working on an important project as a corporate strategist in Bucharest. The geographical change doesn’t help the two to see more eye to eye. Practical joker Winfried loves to annoy his daughter with corny pranks. What’s worse are his little jabs at her routine lifestyle of long meetings, hotel bars and performance reports. Father and daughter reach an impasse, and Winfried agrees to return home to Germany. Enter flashy „Toni Erdmann“: Winfried’s smooth-talking alter ego. Disguised in a tacky suit, weird wig and even weirder fake teeth, Toni barges into Ines’ professional life, claiming to be her CEO’s life coach. As Toni, Winfried is bolder and doesn’t hold back, but Ines meets the challenge. The harder they push, the closer they become. In all the madness, Ines begins to understand that her eccentric father might deserve some place in her life after all.

Toni Erdmann
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About the LUX Prize

LUX Prize

Since 2007, the European Parliament LUX FILM PRIZE casts an annual spotlight on films that go to the heart of European public debate. The European Parliament believes that cinema, a mass cultural medium, can be an ideal vehicle for debate and reflection on Europe and its future.

When the European Parliament created the LUX FILM PRIZE, it decided to focus on distribution because it believes that this is “the Achilles heel of European cinema”. Unlike the largely unified North American market, the film industry in European countries faces huge organisational and economic difficulties which are worsened by language barriers.

The LUX FILM PRIZE has become a quality label backing European film productions. Its winning films have become hits within the EU and beyond. It has helped publicise films that might have otherwise been seen and discovered by few people and has put the spotlight on urgent topical issues.

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