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Their objective was to assess the implementation of the Italian law on abortion and the measures to protect victims of trafficking and prostitution. The goal of this mission to Italy was to check potential abuses and violations of Law 194 (regarding abortion), with a special focus on conscientious objection to abortion among doctors, and to assess the situation of women migrants who are victims of trafficking for the purpose of prostitution.   ‘‘Law 194 is a good legislation, but it’s not implemented in an appropriate way’’, Head of mission Vilija Blinkevičiūtė said during a press conference at the European Parliament’s office in Rome this morning. ‘‘The conscientious objection involves gynaecologists and anaesthetists, with rates as high as 80/90% of doctors in some regions, a level that prevents women from exercising their own rights.’’   Regarding human trafficking, Mrs. Blinkevičiūtė underlined the importance of the visit to the ‘safe houses’ in Mugnano (near Naples), dedicated to women who managed to escape trafficking and prostitution. ‘‘We were touched by their testimonies, from which it clearly emerged that there is a need for more investment in inclusion and integration at all levels: local, regional, national and European.’’ Members of the delegation also reaffirmed the importance for the government to continue supporting the anti-trafficking plan.  

Human trafficking: "Few victims go to court as we don't protect them enough"  Society  11-07-2016 - 11:09   Human trafficking is a highly profitable international crime in which people are traded for use in prostitution, forced labour or other forms of exploitation. In a resolution adopted in plenary last week, MEPs condemned it as a modern kind of slavery and one of the worst forms of human rights violations. Resolution author Barbara Lochbihler, a German member of the Greens/EFA group, told us victims needed more protection and that more needed to be done on forced labour and money laundering. Share this page:  Facebook  Twitter  LinkedIn  Whatsapp  Sign up for mail updates PDF version  Load more Articles 

The debate does get dragged off into prostitution, but we must make sure that we are talking about all victims of human trafficking. Bearing in mind the refugee crisis and the surge in migrant smuggling, what should the new European Commission strategy to combat human trafficking focus on? We have to be very careful that we don't conflate the two issues. People smugglers are not necessarily traffickers. We are finding that people who have arrived in Europe at the hands of people smugglers are hugely vulnerable to be picked up by the traffickers, especially the unaccompanied children. They are at risk of being brought into the sex trade, becoming petty criminals, pickpockets etc. The very sad fact about trafficking is that the vast majority are picked up somewhere else. They either escape or they are arrested for some other crime. Very few slaves or trafficked people are rescued. Very, very few. The vast majority are identified when they are in police custody or when they are being deported. Further information  Report  Procedure file  Catherine Bearder (ALDE, UK)  Women's rights committee  Study of the implementation of the human trafficking directive (April 2016)   Briefing on human trafficking   Briefing: the gender dimension of human trafficking (February 2016)   Product information  Ref.:  20160509STO26419  Share this page:  Facebook  Twitter  LinkedIn  Whatsapp  Sign up for mail updates PDF version  Load more Articles 

Marek Jurek, a Polish member of the ECR group, called for tackling demand by combatting activities such as prostitution. Angelika Mlinar, an Austrian member of the ALDE group, asked what was being done to identify victims and raise awareness of their rights. Human trafficking in the world   Kristiina Kangaspunta, the chief of the UN office on drugs and crime,  presented a report on human trafficking at a global level:  70% of victims are female and 53% of all victims are trafficked for sexual exploitation. She noted that  there was an increasing number of forced labour detections, but no major improvement for the EU in this area. 34% of trafficking happens within the same country. Click here for more news from the EP Further information  Video of the meeting  Mid-term report on the implementation of the EU strategy towards the eradication of trafficking in human beings   Commission press release: trafficking in human beings 2010-2014  UN report on human trafficking  Eurostat report on human trafficking   Women's rights committee  Civil liberties committee  Product information  Ref.:  20141203STO82703  Share this page:  Facebook  Twitter  LinkedIn  Whatsapp  Sign up for mail updates Load more Articles 

On their journeys to and through the EU, they can again become victims of trafficking, prostitution and sexual exploitation. Parliament's position Mary Honeyball, a UK member of the S&D group, has drafted an own-initiative report on women refugees, highlighting the need for gender-sensitive measures as part of broader reforms on EU migration and asylum policies. According to the report, once women are accepted in an EU country, their special needs are often not fully addressed throughout the asylum process, including the fact that they are often travelling with young children. New EU-wide measures should give women access to proper legal advice or the right to request female interviewers and interpreters. Reception centres should include separate sleeping and sanitation facilities for women as well as trauma counselling and appropriate health services. The report also states that having been the victim of violence due to being a woman should be a valid reason for seeking asylum in the European Union. The women's rights committee adopted the non-legislative report on 28 January. All MEPs will debate and vote on the report on 8 March. Women refugees in Europe (source UNHCR)  Out of the refugees who arrived by sea in 2015, 58% were men, 17% women and 25% children (gender not specified).   Since the beginning of 2016, just over 55% of refugees arriving in Europe are women and children.   Find out what the Parliament does to fight gender inequality.

Navigation (Menu)   Navigation (Menu)   Headlines  Headlines  Homepage  Category:EU affairs  Category:World  Category:Economy  Category:Society  Category:Security  Close menu  Press room  Press room  Homepage   Accreditation  Press tool kit  Contacts  Close(Press room)  Agenda  Agenda  Highlights  Weekly agenda  Briefing  Close menu  FAQ   #EuropeansAgainstCovid19   Close the navigation(Menu)     Human trafficking: "Few victims go to court because we don't protect them enough"  Society  11-07-2016 - 11:09     Share this page:  Facebook  Twitter  LinkedIn  Whatsapp          Barbara Lochbihler   Human trafficking is a highly profitable international crime in which people are traded for use in prostitution, forced labour or other forms of exploitation. In a resolution adopted in plenary last week, MEPs condemned it as a modern kind of slavery and one of the worst forms of human rights violations. Resolution author Barbara Lochbihler, a German member of the Greens/EFA group, told us victims needed more protection and that more needed to be done on forced labour and money laundering. Why was it important for the Parliament to adopt a resolution on this now? The EU is carrying out a complete review of its anti-trafficking strategy, so this is the right time to give a stronger view of the situation in its external relations. What measures can the Parliament and the EU implement when dealing with other countries to help fight human trafficking?

We believe that matters concerning childbirth, access to abortion services and prostitution are issues for national governments. This report calls for EU Member States to ensure a minimum number of health professionals available to perform abortions; obliges them to guarantee local obstetric care in rural and mountainous areas; and calls on them to give free access to health services to unemployed women. The payment of healthcare is a Member State responsibility and as a political group, we have to ask the question: why just unemployed women and not unemployed men too? Priorities for the 61th session of the UN Commission on the Status of Women (A8-0018/2017 - Constance Le Grip, Maria Arena) 14-02-2017 British Conservatives in the European Parliament fully support the UK Government’s equality agenda and back many of the aims of the UN Commission on the Status of Women. We want to combat domestic violence in all its forms and support the Istanbul Convention, to which the UK is a signatory. We want to ensure that the most vulnerable in society – often women, children and the elderly – get the protection they need. Sadly, a number of paragraphs in the Le Grip-Arena Report, which contains proposals for the European Council to take to the UN’s 61st Session of the Commission on the Status of Women, go against our core principles of ensuring respect for Member State sovereignty and subsidiarity.

Their objective was to assess the implementation of the Italian law on abortion and the measures to protect victims of trafficking and prostitution. Read more MEPs push for measures to improve the situation fo women with disabilities (29.11.2018) MEPs urged the Commission and member states to take measures to strengthen the rights of women with disabilities, in a resolution adopted on Thursday 29 November. Read more Joint FEMM/DROI statement on the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women (Sunday 25 November 2018) (22.11.2018) Joint statement by Vilija Blinkevičiūtė, Chair of the Committee on Women's Rights and Gender Equality, and Pier Antonio Panzeri, Chair of the Subcommittee on Human Rights. Read more Individual taxation is crucial to achieving tax fairness for women (21.11.2018) Women’s Rights and Gender Equality Committee MEPs adopted a draft report on gender equality and taxation policies in the EU on Wednesday 21 November.  Read more Making quality care services available to all is crucial for work-life balance (15.11.2018) The European Parliament adopted a non-legislative resolution on care services in the EU for improved gender equality on Thursday 15 November. Read more Care services should meet women and men's needs for a work-life balance (10.10.2018) Women’s Rights and Gender Equality Committee MEPs adopted a draft report on care services in the EU for improved gender equality on Wednesday 10 October.