Procedure : 2008/2134(INI)
Document stages in plenary
Document selected : A6-0501/2008

Texts tabled :

A6-0501/2008

Debates :

Votes :

PV 03/02/2009 - 6.5
Explanations of votes
Explanations of votes

Texts adopted :

P6_TA(2009)0036

REPORT     
PDF 153kWORD 111k
12.12.2008
PE 412.348v04-00 A6-0501/2008

on an Agenda for Sustainable Future in General and Business Aviation

(2008/2134(INI))

Committee on Transport and Tourism

Rapporteur: Luís Queiró

MOTION FOR A EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT RESOLUTION
 EXPLANATORY STATEMENT
 OPINION of the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy
 RESULT OF FINAL VOTE IN COMMITTEE

MOTION FOR A EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT RESOLUTION

on an Agenda for Sustainable Future in General and Business Aviation

(2008/2134(INI))

The European Parliament,

–   having regard to the communication from the Commission of 11 January 2007 entitled "Agenda for Sustainable Future in General and Business Aviation" (COM(2007)0869),

–   having regard to the proposal for a Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council of 25 June 2008 amending Regulations (EC) No 549/2004, (EC) No 550/2004, (EC) No 551/2004 and (EC) No 552/2004 in order to improve the performance and sustainability of the European aviation system (COM(2008)0388),

–   having regard to the proposal for a Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council of 25 June 2008 amending Regulation (EC) No 216/2008 in the field of aerodromes, air traffic management and air navigation services and repealing Council Directive 06/23/EEC (COM(2008)0390),

–   having regard to the proposal for a Directive of the European Parliament and of the Council of 20 December 2006 amending Directive 2003/87/EC so as to include aviation activities in the scheme for greenhouse gas emission allowance trading within the Community (COM(2006)0818),

–   having regard to Regulation (EC) No 549/2004 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 10 March 2004 laying down the framework for the creation of the Single European Sky(1), Regulation (EC) No 550/2004 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 10 March 2004 on the provision of air navigation services in the Single European Sky(2), and Regulation (EC) No 551/2004 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 10 March 2004 on the organisation and the use of airspace in the Single European Sky(3),

–   having regard to Regulation (EC) No 216/2008 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 20 February 2008 on common rules in the field of civil aviation and establishing a European Aviation Safety Agency(4) (EASA Regulation),

–   having regard to Council Regulation (EEC) No 95/93 of 18 January 1993 on common rules for the allocation of slots at Community airports(5) (Slot Allocation Regulation),

–   having regard to Commission Regulation (EC) No 375/2007 of 30 March 2007 amending Regulation (EC) No 1702/2003 laying down implementing rules for the airworthiness and environmental certification of aircraft and related products, parts and appliances, as well as for the certification of design and production organisations(6),

–   having regard to Commission Regulation (EC) No 376/2007 of 30 March 2007 amending Regulation (EC) No 2042/2003 on the continuing airworthiness of aircraft and aeronautical products, parts and appliances, and on the approval of organisations and personnel involved in these tasks(7),

–   having regard to Council Regulation (EC) No 219/2007 of 27 February 2007 on the establishment of a Joint Undertaking to develop the new generation European air traffic management system (SESAR)(8),

–   having regard to the Cost Effective Small Aircraft (CESAR) project financed under the 6th Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development,

–   having regard to the communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of Regions of 25 June 2008 entitled "Single European Sky II : towards more sustainable and better performing aviation" (COM(2008)0389),

–   having regard to the communication from the Commission to the Council, the European Parliament, the Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions of 24 January 2007 entitled "An action plan for airport capacity, efficiency and safety in Europe" (COM(2006)0819),

–   having regard to the communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of Regions of 30 April 2008 entitled "On the application of Regulation (EEC) No 95/93 on common rules for the allocation of slots at Community airports, as amended"(COM(2008)0227),

–   having regard to the communication from the Commission of 2 March 2007 entitled "State of progress with the project to implement the new generation European air traffic management system (SESAR)" (COM(2007)0103),

–   having regard to Rule 45 of its Rules of Procedure,

–   having regard to the report of the Committee on Transport and Tourism and the opinion of the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (A6‑0501/2008),

A.  whereas General and Business Aviation comprises a variety of aircraft activities; whereas the term covers all civil aircraft operations other than commercial air transport, as well as on-demand, remunerated, civil air transport operations,

B.  whereas this sector also comprises high value activities as diverse as specialised aerial works (aerial cartography, agricultural flights, firefighting, traffic surveillance), aerial training and recreational flying,

C. whereas there is currently a lack of data and statistical information on General and Business Aviation,

D. whereas General and Business Aviation is the fastest growing segment of civil aviation in Europe; whereas General and Business Aviation complements regular air transport performed by commercial airlines and thus provides specific social and economic benefits such as increasing the mobility of citizens, the productivity of businesses and regional cohesion,

E.  whereas General and Business Aviation is of growing economic importance, in particular for the European manufacturing industry, which has continuously increased its share in the worldwide market and has considerable potential for further growth,

F.  whereas EU aviation policy has traditionally focussed on commercial air transport, while not giving due consideration to its growing impact on General and Business Aviation,

G. whereas rules intended to govern the operation of highly complex commercial aircraft may place a disproportionate financial and regulatory burden on operators of small private aircraft; whereas, therefore, one-size-fits-all regulatory approaches and the uniform enforcement of rules across different aviation sectors have proven inappropriate in certain respects,

H. whereas access to airspace and aerodromes is a key issue for General and Business Aviation, since there is a growing gap between demand and capacity; whereas General and Business Aviation is increasingly in competition for access to airspace and aerodromes with the wider airline industry,

1.  Broadly welcomes the Commission Communication on General and Business Aviation since it provides a sound analysis of the issues affecting the sector and identifies a number of suitable approaches for addressing the specific needs of this sector within a framework of permanent dialogue between all the stakeholders;

Proportionate regulation and subsidiarity

2.  Stresses the need to take into account the interests and specificities of General and Business Aviation in the development of future air transport policy initiatives, with a view to strengthening its competitiveness; in this respect calls on the Commission to ensure the application of the proportionality and subsidiarity principles in the design and implementation of both existing and future aviation legislation;

3.  Reminds the Commission of the need to carry out, on a systematic basis, segmented impact assessments to provide for differentiation of regulations affecting different categories of undertakings and airspace users, if necessary and in so far as this does not compromise safety;

4.  Calls on the Commission when adopting implementing rules on aviation safety, to ensure that they are proportionate and commensurate to the complexity of the respective category of aircraft and operation;

5.  Welcomes the recent adaptation of maintenance standards for aircraft not involved in commercial air transport and in particular for aircraft not classified as “complex motor-powered aircraft" as a good example of proportionate regulation;

6.  Considers that a degree of flexibility at the implementation stage would be desirable as far as general aviation is concerned; this could be achieved by delegating certain supervisory powers to sports and recreational aviation associations and organisations subject to appropriate oversight by the relevant aviation authority and provided that there is no conflict of interests;

7.  Invites the Commission to examine the possibility of laying down simplified security procedures and screening processes for business aviation passengers without in any way compromising their security and safety;

8.  Suggests that the Commission facilitate the exchange of best practice on security measures at small to medium-sized airports;

Airport and airspace capacity

9.  Points out that it becomes increasingly difficult for General and Business Aviation to get access not only to major airports but also to regional airports as growing demand from commercial air transport is placing a strain on the availability of slots and parking stands;

10. Urges the Commission and Member States, through their airport authorities, to tackle these problems by implementing measures to optimise the use of existing capacity by better planning and through the deployment of modern technologies, such as foreseen in the Commission Action Plan for airport capacity, efficiency and safety in Europe ("the Commission's Action Plan");

11. Awaits the advice of the new Community Observatory on Airport Capacity on developing measures to improve the capacity of the European airport network and expects the observatory to play an important role in the implementation of the Commission's Action Plan;

12. Believes that helicopters can be an important short-haul connecting tool between airports and urges the Commission and Member States to include them in capacity-enhancing strategies;

13. Encourages Member States and regional and local authorities to invest in the modernisation and establishment of small and medium-sized airports, which are of major importance for General and Business Aviation;

14. Encourages the Member States to invest in specific infrastructure necessary for the operation and stationing of aircraft in the field of General and Business Aviation;

15. Encourages Member States,  as well as regional and local authorities, to involve all interested parties in consultation processes with a view to dedicating, where appropriate, potential or existing airports for use specifically by General and Business Aviation; where decommissioned military airports are concerned, the consultation should include military authorities;

16. Considers it vitally important that airspace zoning around small and medium-sized airports be appropriate for General and Business Aviation users, and that any changes to such zones be preceded by a consultation with such users;

17. Underlines that business aviation should be given, where possible, adequate access to major airports in order to enable it to connect Europe's regions to its economic centres and requests the Commission to examine and prepare a report to Parliament by the end of 2009 on whether there is a need to adapt relevant provisions of the existing Slot Allocation Regulation;

18. Stresses the need to develop, at European level, a harmonised approach for guaranteeing consistency between airport slots and flight plans, calls on the Commission to propose appropriate measures and encourages the participation of the European airport coordinators in this matter;

19. Expects that the introduction of a system of Air Traffic Management with state-of-the-art and innovative technologies within the framework of the SESAR Joint Undertaking would contribute to fighting fragmentation of European airspace and its forecasted congestion and would significantly increase airspace capacity, which will benefit all airspace users, including General and Business Aviation;

20. Underlines, however, that the SESAR programme must fully take into account the specificities of General and Business Aviation and deliver real benefits to the sector without placing unnecessary burdens on it;

21. Believes that it should be one of the objectives to provide Visual Flight Rules (VFR) users with access to traffic, meteorological and aeronautical information in a user-friendly and cost-effective way;

22. Insists that the "Single European Sky" legislation and SESAR do not lead to disproportionate and excessively costly technological requirements for small aircraft operated under VFR, while fully recognising that all aircraft using controlled airspace must feature equipment providing for an adequate level of safety, such as positioning devices;

Environmental sustainability

23. Considers that General and Business Aviation has a reduced environmental impact in terms of CO2 emissions and noise, when compared with that of commercial air transport;

24. Believes it to be necessary, however, to reduce emissions through further enhancing the environmental performance of smaller aircraft by using cleaner fuels and by promoting research, technological development and innovation; in this respect stresses the importance of initiatives such as "Clean Sky" and CESAR;

25. Notes that the majority of General and Business Aviation falls outside the scope of the Commission proposal to extend the Emission Trading Scheme to aviation;

26. Is of the view that noise issues should be dealt with at national and local levels in accordance with the subsidiarity principle and considers that noise mapping is one of several tools providing for a balanced methodology to ensure airport development without causing significant noise pollution to local citizens;

Other issues

27. Believes that policy-makers must have at their disposal adequate data and statistical information on General and Business Aviation in order to fully understand the sector and thus be able to regulate it properly; therefore calls on the Commission and Eurostat to develop and implement a systematic approach to the gathering and sharing of international and European data;

28. Welcomes the Commission's clarification of legal definitions, including the definition of fractional ownership and recalls that the issue is addressed in the revised EASA Regulation and in the related implementing rules, which are currently under preparation;

29. Calls on the Commission to take appropriate measures to facilitate access of the EU's General and Business Aviation manufacturing industry to world markets;

30. Considers it necessary that the interests of general and business aviation are taken into account in the development of the EU’s external aviation policy, in particular as regards transatlantic flights;

31. Calls on the Commission to reinforce support for aeronautical research, development and innovation, in particular by SMEs that develop and build aircraft for General and Business Aviation;

32. Considers as essential the promotion of recreational and sport aviation, as well as of European aeroclubs, which constitute an important source of professional skills for the entire aviation sector;

33. Calls on the Commission to take account of the important role that this aviation sector plays and can continue to play in the development of vocational training for pilots;

34. Requests the Commission to report back to the European Parliament by the end of 2009 on progress achieved in relation to the issues identified in this report.

o

o        o

35. Instructs its President to forward this resolution to the Council and Commission and the governments and parliaments of the Member States.

(1)

OJ L 96, 31.3.2004, p. 1.

(2)

OJ L 96, 31.3.2004, p. 10.

(3)

OJ L 96, 31.3.2004, p. 20.

(4)

OJ L 79, 19.3.2008, p. 1.

(5)

OJ L 14, 22.1.1993, p. 1.

(6)

OJ L 94, 4.4.2007, p. 3.

(7)

OJ L 94, 4.4.2007, p. 18.

(8)

OJ L 64, 2.3.2007, p. 1.


EXPLANATORY STATEMENT

Background

There is a very diverse range of civil aviation activities, other than commercial air transport. They include flying for the purposes of recreation, personal transport and business. The types of operation differ widely, ranging from recreational flying with non-powered aircraft to complex operation of high performance business jets and specialised aerial works. The Commission Communication refers to these activities as "General and Business aviation". Its scope thus covers "all civil aircraft operations other than commercial air transport" as well as "on-demand, remunerated, civil air transport operations".

This sector has not been addressed specifically at Community level until now as the development of the EU's single aviation market has focussed on commercial air transport. However, the extension of Community competences into aviation safety, security, air traffic management and environmental issues is increasingly having relevance to General and Business Aviation. At the same time, this aviation sector is growing fast in terms of both its volume and economic importance.

The importance of General and Business Aviation

General and business aviation is the fastest growing segment of civil aviation in Europe. It is estimated that there are at present between 30.000 and 50.000 motor-powered General Aviation aircraft. As regards Business Aviation, EUROCONTROL expects the number of business jets (including very light jets) to double to 3500 by the year 2017. In 2006, about 9% of all aircraft movement registered by Eurocontrol accounted for General and Business Aviation and the number of movements in this segment has been growing twice as quickly as the rest of the traffic.

It must also be recognised that European General and Business Aviation provides specific social and economic benefits. By providing flexible and point-to-point transportation, including to airports that are not served by airlines, General and Business aviation increases the mobility of citizens, the productivity of businesses and regional cohesion. Furthermore, aerial works provide essential services in areas such as agriculture, construction, photography or search and rescue operations. Thirdly, recreational and sports aviation contributes to the development of aeronautical skills that are essential for the industry.

Moreover, the economic value of the sector itself and its potential for further growth should be appreciated. This holds in particular for the European manufacturing industry, as about 75% of all type certificates issued by EASA fall under the General and Business Aviation category. Furthermore, the European industry has continuously increased its share in the worldwide General and Business Aviation market, to about 16% at present.

EU policy on general and business aviation

The Commission in its Communication stresses the need to address the specificities of General and Business Aviation and identifies a number of key issues in this regard. Your rapporteur agrees with the selection of areas requiring further consideration and wishes to comment in more detail on the points outlined below:

Data gathering

It is evident that a basic set of data General and Business Aviation, including on safety, must be available for European policy-makers. Your rapporteur agrees that there is currently a lack of adequate statistical information and would therefore support a more systematic approach to the gathering and sharing of data in order to engender a greater understanding of the sector in the Community.

Proportionate regulation

Increased EU regulatory activity in the aviation sector over recent years has shown the limits of the one-size-fits-all regulatory design and the uniform enforcement of regulation across a variety of different aviation sectors. For example, a rule intended to govern the operation of a complex commercial aircraft may place a disproportionate financial or regulatory burden on the operator of a simple single-engined private aircraft. General and Business Aviation in Europe comprises mainly privately owned aircraft and small and medium-sized enterprises having limited resources to keep up with the ongoing regulatory changes.

Your rapporteur therefore strongly supports the Commission in its intention to strictly monitor the application of the proportionality principle both in the policy and rulemaking process and in the actual implementation of aviation legislation. This entails among other things the need to carry out segmented impact assessments in order to provide for a differentiation of regulations affecting different categories of undertakings and airspace users, if appropriate. The Commission should therefore establish a procedure whereby the impact of existing and planned EU legislation on the different segments of General and Business Aviation is systematically assessed. At the same time, however, it must be ensured that "proportionate regulation" does not compromise safety for the general public.

The crucial question for the General and Business Aviation sector is how the proportionality principle will be put into practice. Generally speaking, the basic EASA Regulation and the Commission's proposal for its amendment provide for the possibility to adopt flexible and proportionate implementing rules with regard to different kinds of operations and aircraft. In this context, specific criteria or exemptions from certification should be envisaged for certain categories of operations where there are no safety or public interest reasons to justify such a procedure.

In relation to non-commercial aviation, your rapporteur welcomes the recent adoption of measures of to adapt airworthiness rules(1), following an impact assessment carried out by EASA, which had concluded that these rules are too stringent for the industry. The adaptation of these requirements is a good example of proportionate regulation without compromising safety.

As regards security rules, it may be necessary to adapt requirements for business aviation. Contrary to mainline carriers, all passengers are normally known to the operator. It may therefore be appropriate to specify simplified security procedures and screening processes in line with the principle of proportionality, without compromising the security of passengers.

Airport and airspace capacity

Access to airspace and aerodromes is a key issue for General and Business Aviation. As highlighted in the Commission Communication, Europe is facing a growing gap between capacity and demand as traffic volumes continue to rise. General and Business Aviation is thus increasingly in competition for access to airspace and infrastructure with the wider airline industry.

a.) Airports/aerodromes

It is often very difficult for General and Business Aviation to access hub airports. The majority of the General and Business Aviation fleet therefore operates mainly from and to (secondary) regional airports. This has facilitated the creation of a network of more than 80.000 city pairs connecting various regions in Europe. However, there is growing concern among the General and Business Aviation sector about access not only to the large international airports but also, increasingly, to regional airports, since growing demand from the commercial air transport sector is placing strains on the availability of take-off and landing slots available to non-scheduled operators as well as on the availability of aircraft parking stands. Hence, General and Business Aviation flights are experiencing more and more problems to get slots at times of their choice, while their flights could be important for the economy of the region around the airport in question.

Your rapporteur welcomes the Commission's efforts to tackle these challenges within the framework of its "Action plan for airport capacity, efficiency and safety in Europe"(2). In particular, he agrees that it will be necessary to optimize the use of existing capacity, including employment of dedicated infrastructure, to meet the needs of General and Business aviation. Modern technologies, such as automatic weather reporting systems, unmanned Air Traffic Services as well as inclusion of Global Navigation Satellite Systems in Air Traffic Management procedures should also prove useful.

Given their predominant role for General and Business Aviation, the establishment or modernisation of small and medium-sized aerodromes should be promoted and Member States should be encouraged to invest in this sector. However, your rapporteur considers it important that Business Aviation is also given adequate access to major airports in order to enable it to connect Europe's regions to its economic centres. In this context, the Commission should examine whether the current Slot Allocation Regulation(3) provides for fair, proportionate and equal access of non-scheduled operations to EU airports. Furthermore, it may be useful to develop and establish, at European level, a set of harmonised rules and procedures for guaranteeing consistency between airport slots and flight plans.

b.) Airspace

Airspace capacity is an equally important issue for General and Business Aviation. In this context, your rapporteur stresses the importance of institutional and technological reforms within the Single European Sky and the SESAR Joint Undertaking, which are expected to bring safety, cost and efficiency benefits for all airspace users including General and Business Aviation. Among other things, SESAR aims to achieve a threefold increase in capacity through improved Air Traffic Management.

However, stakeholders (mainly from sports and recreational aviation) have voiced some concern, in particular regarding the expansion of controlled airspace at the expense of uncontrolled airspace, where a significant amount of General and Business Aviation activity is carried out. Furthermore it is stressed that SESAR should not lead to disproportionate equipment requirements for smaller aircraft, most of which rely on the "see and avoid" principle". In many cases, there are simple alternatives with a significantly better cost/benefit available.

Your rapporteur believes that Single European Sky and SESAR should give full recognition to the specificities of General and Business Aviation sector and address these concerns. In addition, it should be ensured that real benefits are delivered to the sector without placing unnecessary burdens on it. For instance, there is a need to provide access to basic meteorological, flight information service and aeronautical information in a user friendly and cost efficient way.

Environmental sustainability

The benefits of General and Business Aviation described earlier have to be offset against its environmental impact, in particular as regards emissions contributing to climate change and noise. At the same time, however, it must be recognised that the overall impact of small aircraft in terms of both CO2 emissions and noise is far less than that of commercial air transport aircraft.

The impact of aviation in terms of climate change is partly addressed by the Commission proposal to extend the emission trading scheme to aviation. Most of General and Business Aviation would, however, fall outside the scope of the proposal. For those included (i.e. a limited number of business aviation operators), the scheme should be designed in a way that firstly minimises their administrative costs and, secondly, avoids distortions of competition between them and other forms of commercial air transport. As far as noise is concerned, your rapporteur agrees that in accordance with the subsidiarity principle, the issue should be dealt with at national, if not local, level.

Despite considerable improvements over past decades (in terms of both gaseous emissions and noise), your rapporteur highlights that the environmental performance of smaller aircraft must be further enhanced. It is therefore necessary to promote research and technological development trough initiatives such as "Clean Sky" and CESAR. Finally, SESAR is also expected to enhance the environmental performance of aviation. Its ambitious aim is to reduce the environmental impact per flight by some 10% thanks to new technologies and revised air traffic management procedures.

(1)

Revision of Regulations (EC) No 1702/2003 et 2042/2003

(2)

COM (2006) 819

(3)

Regulation (EEC) 95/93


OPINION of the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (5.11.2008)

for the Committee on Transport and Tourism

on an agenda for sustainable future in general and business aviation

(2008/2134(INI))

Rapporteur: Daniel Caspary

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on Industry, Research and Energy calls on the Committee on Transport and Tourism, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions in its motion for a resolution:

1.  Recognises the need for a tailored approach towards general and business aviation due to its different nature compared with the commercial aviation industry; welcomes the Commission's Communication, which gives a systematic overview of the sector;

2.  Emphasises the importance of a proportionate regulatory approach, which takes into account the needs of small and medium-sized enterprises active in the sector;

3.   Urges the Commission to clarify the definitions of the structural components of general and business aviation and to harmonise the interpretation of legally binding definitions contained in international, Community and national regulations;

4.  Stresses the need for more research in the framework of the Seventh Framework Programme on new types of aircraft, which are more energy efficient and environmentally friendly; underlines further the need for research on noise-mitigating technologies as well as on air traffic management;

5.  Notes that smaller aircraft are not included in the future Emission Trading System (ETS) but that a voluntary carbon-offset mechanism is being developed by the sector; regrets that the design of the ETS discriminates against business aviation by allocating free emission allowances to commercial airlines but in practice forcing business aviation operators to purchase close to 100% of the allowances which they require under the scheme on the market;

6.  Urges the Commission to ensure that future regulation is compatible with the rules of the EU's main trading partners; furthermore, calls on the Commission to pursue with great efforts better market access in third countries which will allow EU companies to increase their global market share and stimulate EU industrial production;

7.  Stresses the importance of fair access to airport infrastructure and airspace for business aviation operators; recalls that the establishment of the Single European Sky is urgent in order to generate its environmental benefits and efficiency gains for operators and passengers;

8.   Highlights the increase in capacity constraints in major airports for airspace users in this sector and therefore urges the Commission and the Member States to find the appropriate means for optimising and increasing the capacity of regional and local airports.

RESULT OF FINAL VOTE IN COMMITTEE

Date adopted

4.11.2008

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

41

2

1

Members present for the final vote

Jerzy Buzek, Jorgo Chatzimarkakis, Giles Chichester, Pilar del Castillo Vera, Den Dover, Lena Ek, Nicole Fontaine, Adam Gierek, David Hammerstein, Rebecca Harms, Mary Honeyball, Romana Jordan Cizelj, Pia Elda Locatelli, Eugenijus Maldeikis, Eluned Morgan, Reino Paasilinna, Atanas Paparizov, Aldo Patriciello, Francisca Pleguezuelos Aguilar, Anni Podimata, Miloslav Ransdorf, Vladimír Remek, Herbert Reul, Amalia Sartori, Andres Tarand, Patrizia Toia, Nikolaos Vakalis, Adina-Ioana Vălean, Dominique Vlasto

Substitute(s) present for the final vote

Pilar Ayuso, Etelka Barsi-Pataky, Ivo Belet, Daniel Caspary, Zdzisław Kazimierz Chmielewski, Juan Fraile Cantón, Neena Gill, Robert Goebbels, Cristina Gutiérrez-Cortines, Gunnar Hökmark, Pierre Pribetich, Esko Seppänen, Silvia-Adriana Ţicău, Vladimir Urutchev, Lambert van Nistelrooij


RESULT OF FINAL VOTE IN COMMITTEE

Date adopted

2.12.2008

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

28

4

1

Members present for the final vote

Gabriele Albertini, Etelka Barsi-Pataky, Paolo Costa, Michael Cramer, Luis de Grandes Pascual, Arūnas Degutis, Petr Duchoň, Saïd El Khadraoui, Robert Evans, Emanuel Jardim Fernandes, Francesco Ferrari, Brigitte Fouré, Mathieu Grosch, Georg Jarzembowski, Stanisław Jałowiecki, Dieter-Lebrecht Koch, Sepp Kusstatscher, Jörg Leichtfried, Eva Lichtenberger, Marian-Jean Marinescu, Erik Meijer, Seán Ó Neachtain, Luís Queiró, Reinhard Rack, Ulrike Rodust, Brian Simpson, Ulrich Stockmann, Michel Teychenné, Silvia-Adriana Ţicău, Lars Wohlin

Substitute(s) present for the final vote

Luigi Cocilovo, Jas Gawronski, Lily Jacobs

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