Procedure : 2008/2217(INI)
Document stages in plenary
Document selected : A6-0199/2009

Texts tabled :

A6-0199/2009

Debates :

PV 22/04/2009 - 18
CRE 22/04/2009 - 18

Votes :

PV 23/04/2009 - 8.33
Explanations of votes
Explanations of votes

Texts adopted :

P6_TA(2009)0307

REPORT     
PDF 178kWORD 136k
2.4.2009
PE 416.379v02-00 A6-0199/2009

on an action plan on urban mobility

(2008/2217(INI))

Committee on Transport and Tourism

Rapporteur: Gilles Savary

MOTION FOR A EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT RESOLUTION
 EXPLANATORY STATEMENT
 OPINION of the Committee on Regional Development
 RESULT OF FINAL VOTE IN COMMITTEE

MOTION FOR A EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT RESOLUTION

on an action plan on urban mobility

(2008/2217(INI))

The European Parliament,

–   having regard to the Commission Green Paper of 25 September 2007 entitled ‘Towards a new culture for urban mobility’ (COM(2007)0551),

–   having regard to the Commission White Paper of 12 September 2001 entitled ‘European transport policy for 2010: time to decide’ (COM(2001)0370),

–   having regard to the Commission Communication of 18 October 2007 entitled ‘Freight Transport Logistics Action Plan’ (COM(2007)0607),

–   having regard to the Commission Communication of 17 September 2007 entitled ‘Towards Europe-wide Safer, Cleaner and Efficient Mobility: The First Intelligent Car Report’ (COM(2007)0541),

–   having regard to the Commission Communication of 7 February 2007 entitled ‘A Competitive Automotive Regulatory Framework for the 21st Century – Commission’s position on the CARS 21 High Level Group Final Report – A contribution to the EU’s Growth and Jobs Strategy’ (COM(2007)0022),

–   having regard to the Commission Communication of 28 June 2006 entitled ‘Freight Transport Logistics in Europe – the key to sustainable mobility’ (COM(2006)0336),

–   having regard to the Commission Communication of 22 June 2006 entitled ‘Keep Europe moving – Sustainable mobility for our continent – Mid-term review of the European Commission’s 2001 Transport White Paper’ (COM(2006)0314),

–   having regard to the Commission Communication of 15 February 2006 entitled ‘On the Intelligent Car Initiative – Raising Awareness of ICT for Smarter, Safer and Cleaner Vehicles’ (COM(2006)0059),

–   having regard to the Commission Communication of 11 January 2006 entitled ‘On Thematic Strategy on the Urban Environment’ (COM(2005)0718),

–   having regard to the Commission proposals and guidelines, and the European Parliament positions, on the Structural Funds, the Cohesion Fund and the Seventh Framework Programme for Research,

–   having regard to the revised proposal for a Directive of the European Parliament and of the Council on the promotion of clean and energy efficient road transport vehicles (COM(2007)0817),

–   having regard to its resolution of 9 July 2008 on ‘Towards a new culture of urban mobility’(1),

–   having regard to its resolution of 19 June 2008 on ‘Towards Europe-wide Safer, Cleaner and Efficient Mobility: The First Intelligent Car Report’(2),

–   having regard to its resolution of 20 February 2008 on ‘the input for the 2008 Spring Council as regards the Lisbon Strategy’(3),

–   having regard to its resolution of 12 October 1988 on the protection of pedestrians and the European charter of pedestrians' rights(4),

–   having regard to its resolution of 15 January 2008 on ‘CARS 21: A Competitive Automotive Regulatory Framework’(5),

–   having regard to its resolution of 5 September 2007 on ‘Freight Transport Logistics in Europe – the key to sustainable mobility’(6),

–   having regard to its resolution of 12 July 2007 on ‘Keep Europe moving – Sustainable mobility for our continent’(7),

–   having regard to Directive 2008/50/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 May 2008 on ambient air quality and cleaner air for Europe(8),

–   having regard to Regulation (EC) No 1370/2007 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 23 October 2007 on public passenger transport services by rail and by road(9),

–   having regard to Directive 2004/49/EC of 29 April 2004 on safety on the Community’s railways(10) (Railway Safety Directive),

–   having regard to Directive 2000/40/EC of 26 June 2000 on the approximation of the laws of the Member States relating to the front underrun protection of motor vehicles(11),

–   having regard to the Commission’s announcement of an action plan on urban transport, publication of which has been postponed several times and for which there is no precise deadline,

–   having regard to the legal bases constituted by Articles 70 to 80 of Title V of the EC Treaty,

–   having regard to Rule 45 of its Rules of Procedure,

–   having regard to the report of the Committee on Transport and Tourism and the opinion of the Committee on Regional Development (A6-0199/2009),

A.  whereas urban transport constitutes a considerable proportion of all transport, with the legal basis therefore constituted by Articles 70 to 80 of the EC Treaty granting the European Union shared competence with the Member States in that field,

B.   whereas numerous cross‑cutting and modal European directives and regulations have an impact on urban transport and these need to be aligned through a targeted approach to the issue of urban travel,

C.  whereas the European ‘Climate Plan’ adopted by the European Council of 8‑9 March 2007 sets the ambitious objectives of a 20 % reduction in energy consumption, a 20 % saving in fossil fuels and 20 % supply of renewable energy by 2020, and these targets cannot be achieved without a strategy suitably tailored to urban transport,

D.  whereas the CIVITAS research and development programme has been a great success, reflecting the importance, for transport‑organising local authorities and companies, of European investment in innovative urban transport programmes,

E.   whereas the Cohesion Fund and the Structural Funds finance urban mobility programmes, but have the drawback, on the one hand, of lacking any European urban mobility strategy or objectives and, on the other hand, of being unequally allotted across the Union,

F.   whereas urban areas are prime intermodal and interconnection poles for Trans‑European transport networks, which must help achieve their general aims of sustainable European mobility and the sustainable competitiveness of networks of EU towns and cities,

G.  whereas urban areas are important centres of business activity and goods transport is vital to satisfy the needs of the population and at the same time faces challenges owing to restricted storage space and limited time‑slots for delivery,

H.  whereas strict compliance with the principle of subsidiarity and the right to local planning autonomy precludes the proposal of a prescriptive European policy, but allows the Union to adopt an incentive strategy of the same nature as its regional and cohesion policy without imposing top‑down solutions,

I.    whereas the issue of urban areas cannot be addressed through modal policies, but only via an approach centring on users and integrated transport systems,

J.    whereas an efficient and sustainable urban transport policy for the benefit of both European citizens and the European economy will only be guaranteed by ensuring fair treatment between the transport of goods and of passengers and between the different modes of transport,

K.  whereas urban planning which takes account of the demographic change in society by, for example, locating housing designed for the elderly in city centres and shops close to where people live can contribute significantly to traffic avoidance,

L.   whereas there is a need for robust urban travel strategies that optimise the instruments of urban travel by developing intermodal exchange platforms and integrating various travel systems,

M.  whereas there is a need for reliable and more systematic statistics enabling the assessment of local public policies and an exchange of best practices in the field of urban travel,

N.  whereas the various techniques applied in urban transport are of economic and technological importance in terms of the European Union’s competitiveness and its external trade,

O. whereas the time limits imposed by the forthcoming European legislative elections mean that it must keep to the timetable set for the parliamentary debate announced by the Commission on the action plan on urban transport,

1.   Regrets that the action plan on urban mobility announced by the Commission has not been published and, while approving of the separate initiatives, stresses the need for a cohesive approach; decides, therefore, to follow up its own‑initiative report, fully respecting the principles of subsidiarity and proportionality, by drawing up proposals for a European action plan on urban mobility;

2.   Recalls that urban transport is subject to the subsidiarity principle, but nevertheless stresses that local authorities often cannot meet these challenges without European cooperation and coordination, so that the Commission must provide studies and a legal framework, finance research, and promote and disseminate best practice on the principle that it should be available to everyone in all EU languages;

3.   Asks the Commission to publish a compendium of binding European regulatory provisions in this area and offer regions and cities a common frame of reference to make it easier for them to make choices as regards the planning and implementation of development strategy;

Accelerating European research and innovation in the field of urban mobility

4.   Proposes the immediate launch of a programme for the upgrading of statistics and databases on urban mobility at Eurostat, including in particular:

- data on traffic, including soft modes of transport (cycling, walking, etc.),

- statistics on air pollution and noise, accidents, traffic jams and congestion,

- quantitative and qualitative statistics and indicators on transport services and their supply;

5.   Suggests that a European internet portal and forum on urban mobility be launched immediately in order to facilitate the exchange and dissemination of information, good practices and innovations, particularly in the field of soft transport;

6.   Suggests that an annual European prize be introduced, incorporating the CIVITAS awards into the European mobility week, to reward outstanding and transferable transport initiatives and projects;

7.   Proposes that a new generation CIVITAS initiative be developed (CIVITAS IV), around calls for projects covering, inter alia:

- ancillary services relating to intermodal transport (pricing, etc.),

- urban transport ergonomics programmes (comfort),

- innovations in terms of intermodal accessibility, not least for people with reduced mobility (PRM),

- integrated urban transport information programmes for users, enabling them to optimise their travel and alter trips in response to the vagaries of the network;

8.   Proposes that ITS research and development be stepped up, that it be better co-ordinated with the needs and objectives of urban residents and local authorities and that it be directed towards:

-    integrated information management and traffic management systems,

-    reduction of nuisance factors and accidents,

-    use of new interoperable information and communications technologies, including satellite technologies and NFC(12), through the use of GSM, for the provision of information to users and the issuing of integrated travel tickets,

-    safety and security on public transport;

-    developing a new generation of urban vehicles;

-    innovative solutions to efficient goods transport, particularly local goods distribution in cities;

9.   Calls for national and European funding for ITS applications to be increased so as to enable greater deployment of ITS by local authorities;

Encouraging optimisation of various modes of transport by improving urban scheduling

10. Requests that the integrated approach principle be promoted in a partnership-based governance framework that brings together urban, peri-urban, national and European players and that takes account of transport-related issues: social integration, noise, safety, competitiveness, environment, etc.; reiterates its request that an integrated approach be compulsory in the programming and choice of Structural Fund projects;

11. Recommends the introduction of integrated sustainable urban travel plans in conurbations with over 100 000 inhabitants, comprising:

-    a mobility diagnostic and mobility indicators and targets, and an assessment of their economic, social and environmental impact,

-    a plan for the development and interconnection of transport networks coordinated with the regional transport plan and urban planning policies,

-    a plan for the development of soft traffic infrastructure (cycle paths, pedestrian zones, ect.) fully integrated with public transport,

-    a masterplan for intermodal car parks and exchange platforms,

-    a programme for adapting management of urban mobility networks and their interconnections to the needs of reduced mobility users,

-    a masterplan for urban logistics, including the possibility of using public infrastructure for freight transport,

-   a procedure for direct participation by the general public;

12. Recommends that a permanent European forum on urban transport governance be created for representative transport-organising authorities, including user and citizens’ organisations and professional federations of transport operators, in order to promote the exchange and dissemination of best practices;

13. Proposes that European financing in the field of urban transport be made conditional on the existence of integrated urban mobility (urban travel) plans;

14. Advocates cooperation between, and the operational integration of, authorities responsible for the organisation of public transport, traffic and parking in European cities of over 250 000 inhabitants, in comparable areas, based on movements of population and goods and in line with local circumstances;

15. Urges organising authorities to set themselves proactive, coherent targets for greenhouse gas emission reductions by means of mobility policies set out in the travel plans (see Article 7) and to derive from these targets specific performance obligations for public or private transport service operators;

16. Proposes that experiences in the field of tariff integration (including the 'Interoperable Fare Management' project) and the provision of intermodal information and information between organising authorities in EU conurbations be evaluated, in order to facilitate the exchange of best practices;

EU added value: incentivising sustainable mobility in urban areas

17. Advocates the setting‑up of an urban mobility observatory within the Commission, but does not wish a new agency to be created;

18. Regrets the fact that during the current aid programming period 2007-2013, only some 9% (equivalent to EUR 8 000 000 000) of all Structural Fund spending on transport (equivalent to EUR 82 000 000 000) is earmarked for urban transport; considers this proportion too small to be able to meet the challenges of devising appropriate mobility in European cities and environmental and climate protection;

19. Strongly suggests that the possibility be examined, under the 2014-2020 financial perspective, of a European financial instrument for urban mobility (integrated programme of the Marco‑Polo type) enabling the cofinancing of:

-    surveys of urban travel plans with a view to encouraging their widespread introduction,

-    a proportion of investments in modes of transport that meet the EU’s environmental and socio-economic objectives;

and proposes that this financing be allocated as an incentive, on the basis of calls for tender that meet European specifications;

20. Calls for the Commission to draw up a report on zones with access regulations in urban areas in order to assess their impact on mobility, quality of life, emissions and external effects, health and security, taking into account the need for a system of enforcing criminal and non-criminal cross-border traffic offences;

21.  Proposes that an information and urban transport ticketing network for the main urban destinations in the European Union be set up in stations and airports of departure, where these are in the EU;

22. Recommends that a ‘users charter’ be drawn up for urban transport, to include pedestrians and cyclists, and the distribution of goods and services covering road sharing, in order to reduce the current disparities;

23. Takes the view that the urban planning model of the 'short journey city' is the best means of ensuring environmentally acceptable and climate-compatible mobility in cities;

24. Encourages the Commission and local authorities to step up and expand their initiatives relating to "car‑free days", as implemented on the annual European car‑free day;

25. Calls on the Commission to come up with a harmonised approach towards green zones and the development of a single European green zone sticker as soon as possible in order to prevent the development of different approaches per city or Member State with considerable inconvenience for citizens and companies;

26. Considers that urban mobility initiatives should also seek to establish inter-urban networks in order to link up major cities, ensure their economic development, facilitate the rapid transport of individuals and goods;

Urban transport: an industry and European technologies which should find expression in the Lisbon Strategy and the European economic recovery plan

27. Suggests that a European policy be introduced for the standardisation and certification of equipment as regards safety and health, comfort (noise, vibrations, etc.), network interoperability (‘busways’, tram-train, etc.), accessibility for people with reduced mobility or people with child strollers, soft transport and clean-engine technologies (buses, taxis, etc.), on the basis of a carbon audit and an impact analysis of the costs for operators and users;

28. Urges constant care to ensure that all decisions take account of the need to ensure proportionality between costs and benefits and the possibility of subsidising less affluent users (the disabled, large families, welfare recipients);

29. Advises that guidelines be issued on minimum recommendations for quality of service, evaluation and participation by users and citizens, in the context of the opening‑up of urban transport networks to competition under Regulation (EC) No 1370/2007;

30. Suggests that a significant proportion of the appropriations released by the European economic recovery plan be allocated to the financing of on-going urban transport and public transport investments and projects that can be financed immediately and implemented before 31 December 2009;

31. Notes that, under the European Economic Recovery plan, Structural Fund resources for sustainable infrastructure projects are being brought forward; calls on Member States and the regions as a matter of urgency to use a substantial proportion of these resources for climate-compatible urban transport;

32. Calls on the Commission to take note of the proposals contained in this resolution, and of Parliament’s wish for it to take the initiative in this area, leading as soon as possible to an action plan;

o

o        o

33. Instructs its President to forward this resolution to the Council and the Commission and the governments and parliaments of the Member States.

(1)

Texts adopted of that date, P6_TA(2008)0356.

(2)

Texts adopted of that date, P6_TA(2008)0311.

(3)

Texts adopted of that date, P6_TA(2008)0057.

(4)

OJ C 290, 14.11.1988, p. 51.

(5)

Texts adopted of that date, P6_TA(2008)0007.

(6)

OJC 187 E, 24.7.2008, p. 154.

(7)

OJC 175 E, 10.7.2008, p. 556.

(8)

OJL 152, 11.6.2008, p. 1.

(9)

OJL 315, 3.12.2007, p. 1.

(10)

OJL 164, 30.4.2004, p. 44.

(11)

OJL 203, 10.8.2000, p. 9.

(12)

NFC, which stands for Near Field Communication is a technology for the exchange of data over very small distances that enables radio-identification.


EXPLANATORY STATEMENT

Transport policy has been a major Community competence since the Treaty of Rome in 1957. It is governed by Title V of the EC Treaty (Articles 70 à 80) and is a competence shared between the Member States and the European Union and exercised on the basis of Article 251 of the EC Treaty (codecision).

60% of Europeans lived in urban areas in 2005, and that number will rise to 80% in 2020, making urban transport a major component of goods and passenger transport in Europe.

A host of cross‑cutting European legislation, such as the Air Quality Directive (Directive 2008/50/EC adopted on 21 May 2008), the PSO Regulation (EC 1370/2007 of 23 October 2007), the Clean Vehicles Directive (2005/0283/COD, adopted by Parliament on 22 October 2008), and of modal legislation, such as the directives and regulations on railway and airport security and safety, railway infrastructure charging (Directives 2001/14/EC and 2004/49/EC), the directives on motor vehicle protection (Directive 2000/40/EC) and various regulations on road, rail and air travel equipment, have all affected urban transport, without the European Union having adopted a specific strategy in its regard.

I. Urban transport: an emerging issue

Two specific Commission initiatives on urban transport should nevertheless be noted:

-          the CIVITAS Programme (created in 2002), which draws on appropriations under the Framework Programme for Research and Development to finance research and innovation in the field of urban transport. To date, around forty European cities have received CIVITAS funding amounting to EUR 100 million (a budget of over EUR 300 million has been allocated to the initiative as a whole) and participate in a permanent forum for the exchange of experiences and good practices.

- as part of the move to steer transport policy towards sustainable mobility, the White Paper ‘European transport policy for 2010: time to decide, published by the Commission in 2001 at the initiative of the Commissioner Loyola de Palacio, heralded the integration of urban transport into the European policy for sustainable mobility that the White Paper promotes. According to the Commissioner, the aim was to mark a genuine turning point in common transport policy and to post new ambitions for the common transport policy by: permanently shifting the balance between modes of transport and developing intermodality, resolutely tackling congestion and placing safety and the quality of services at the heart of European actions, while preserving the right to mobility. The White Paper contains over 60 proposals concerning the various modes of transport (rail, road, sea and air).

High expectations on the part of networks of European cities, and also of urban transport players (organising authorities, operators and constructors) and user groups, led to Commissioner Jacques Barrot announcing a Commission initiative in this field in June 2007 which was taken over and confirmed by his successor, Antonio Tajani, who wanted to make it a priority of his tenure.

II. Benefit to the European Union of action in the field of urban transport

1. The Green Paper ‘Towards a new culture for urban mobility: a Commission initiative and a European Parliament resolution in expectation of an action plan

On 25 September 2007, the Commission published a Green Paper on urban transport entitled ‘Towards a new culture for urban mobility’, which was the subject of a broad consultation process, the findings of which have still to be disseminated and made public.

On 9 July 2008, the European Parliament adopted a resolution contributing to the Green Paper (on the basis of the report by Reinhard Rack of 12 June 2008), which laid the emphasis on the following avenues for discussion:

- clear delineation of areas of responsibility of the EU;

- identification of the areas in which action must be taken at EU level:

* development of an integrated global approach

* gathering and dissemination of reliable and comparable data

* creation of a ‘European Platform for Urban Mobility’

* evaluation of the external costs of the various modes of transport;

- dissemination and exchange of good practices;

- financing of projects from EU funds to be more closely linked to conditions and requirements relating to sustainable transport and environmental protection.

Based on the announcements made by the Commission, that European Parliament resolution was adopted in expectation of a draft action plan which it proved impossible to present before the end of 2008 as had originally been envisaged.

2. The European Parliament takes over the initiative for an action plan for urban transport

Since no draft action plan has been published by the Commission and in view of the time limits imposed by the forthcoming European elections in June 2009, the European Parliament, on a proposal from the Committee on Transport and Tourism, has decided in this exceptional case to draw up ex nihilo this own‑initiative report on the action plan.

3. A key component of EU transport policy

The question of urban transport is always bound to be integral to European Union transport policy, in that it governs:

- the mobility of persons and goods in application of the principle of the freedom of movement, which is core to completion of the European internal market;

- the planning of intermodal exchange points between air, sea, river, road and rail traffic in European Union;

- the linking‑up of urban areas to Trans‑European Transport Networks and proper completion of the 30 priority projects identified in the 2004 TEN‑T programme

Were this not to be so, EU transport policy would be ignoring one of its key social and territorial dimensions.

Besides this, the European Union cannot disregard the economic competitiveness issues at stake for its engineering sector and various transport industries, associated with their adapting to a strategy for sustainable mobility and to the technical drive towards achieving that sustainable mobility.

4. Incorporating urban transport into the Climate Plan

Since the publication of the 2001 White Paper, the European Union has decided, following the European Council of March 2007, to set the particularly ambitious target of a 20% increase in energy efficiency, a 20% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions and 20% renewable energies as a proportion of overall EU energy consumption by 2020.

The significant proportion of greenhouse gases (40% from traffic) generated by road traffic, which is predominant in urban areas, along with the considerable problems of congestion, accidents, traffic jams and respect for local residents’ living environment, justify an EU initiative in keeping with its legal bases relating to transport and the environment and the Council’s policy objectives.

III. The role of the European Union in the field of urban transport

· Strict respect for the principle of subsidiarity

Most of the EU Member States, be they federal or not, respect the principle (often enshrined in the constitution) of administrative freedom for local authorities. Local authorities and assemblies are free to determine their own urban and peri‑urban transport policies, programmes and investments.

The European Union cannot therefore contemplate taking even the most minimal prescriptive initiative concerning local authority transport policy. However, just as it did following long discussions over that principle during the debate on Regulation (EC) No 1370/2007 concerning Public Service Obligations in the transport sector(1), the EU has every right, by any means that enable it to add value to local decisions, to encourage urban transport to help achieve the general objectives of its policy on environmental protection and combating climate change.

· A ‘user‑centred’ approach

Encouraging more sustainable forms of urban mobility entails simultaneously:

- influencing the behaviour of the users of transport and public space, in order to encourage them to optimise and diversify their modes of travel in line with lifestyles and the specific constraints of urban areas;

- adapting transport possibilities and modes of urban travel physically and qualitatively to the objectives of enhancing the living environment, meeting the EU’s climate and environment objectives, diversification, physical accessibility and affordability for all members of the public, and the safety and comfort of modes of urban travel.

· An ‘urban travel systems’ approach

The complexity and interdependence of travel systems and personal and collective modes of transport in urban areas makes a purely technical approach, focusing on various individual modes of transport, very limiting.

On the contrary, the reasoning should be in terms of ‘integrated travel systems’ which link soft modes of travel with diversified and complementary modes of transport.

Special attention should be devoted to the quality of services and equipment, and to the integration of pricing, technical and network operations across the various modes.

(1)

Regulation (EC) No 1370/2007 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 23 October 2007 on public passenger transport services by rail and by road and repealing Council Regulations (EEC) Nos 1191/69 and 1107/70


OPINION of the Committee on Regional Development (20.2.2009)

for the Committee on Transport and Tourism

on the urban mobility action plan

(2008/2217(INI))

Rapporteur: Jean Marie Beaupuy

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on Regional Development calls on the Committee on Transport and Tourism, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions in its motion for a resolution:

1.  Stresses that a European sustainable urban mobility strategy is essential if the European Union is to reach its target of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 20% by 2020; regrets the Commission's tardiness in publishing its action plan, initially planned for the end of 2008;

2.  Takes the view that the urban planning model of the 'short journey city' is the best means of ensuring environmentally acceptable and climate-compatible mobility in cities;

3.  Recalls that urban transport is subject to the subsidiarity principle, but nevertheless stresses that local authorities often cannot meet these challenges without European cooperation and coordination, so that the Commission must provide studies and a legal framework, finance research, and promote and disseminate best practice on the principle that it should be available to everyone in all EU languages; asks the Commission to publish a compendium of binding European regulatory provisions in this area and offer regions and cities a common frame of reference to make it easier for them to make choices as regards the planning and implementation of development strategy;

4.  Considers that urban mobility initiatives should also seek to establish inter-urban networks in order to link up major cities, ensure their economic development, facilitate the rapid transport of individuals and goods and promote tourism;

5.  Requests that the integrated approach principle be promoted in a partnership-based governance framework that brings together urban, peri-urban, national and European players and that takes account of transport-related issues: social integration, noise, safety, competitiveness, environment, etc.; reiterates its request that an integrated approach be compulsory in the programming and choice of Structural Fund projects;

6.  Regrets the fact that during the current aid programming period 2007-2013, only some 9% (equivalent to EUR 8 000 000 000) of all Structural Fund spending on transport (equivalent to EUR 82 000 000 000) is earmarked for urban transport; considers this proportion too small to be able to meet the challenges of devising appropriate mobility in European cities and environmental and climate protection;

7.  Notes that, under the European Economic Recovery plan, Structural Fund resources for sustainable infrastructure projects are being brought forward; calls on Member States and the regions as a matter of urgency to use a substantial proportion of these resources for climate-compatible urban transport;

8.  Calls on the Commission to develop tools to facilitate the implementation and evaluation of an integrated sustainable urban transport policy and in particular:

     -    to help Member States and towns to improve the sustainability of town and country planning and urban and peri-urban transport planning, for example via the development of urban travel plans; invites economic players to contribute fully to this strategy from the point of view of company travel plans;

     -    to facilitate the implementation of an integrated and partnership-based governance approach by drawing up a guide for those working at grass-roots level, and studies that demonstrate the cost of a non-integrated approach;

     -    to determine relevant, harmonised indicators and create an urban transport overview, allowing for comparative evaluation of towns.

RESULT OF FINAL VOTE IN COMMITTEE

Date adopted

12.2.2009

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

45

0

0

Members present for the final vote

Emmanouil Angelakas, Stavros Arnaoutakis, Elspeth Attwooll, Rolf Berend, Victor Boştinaru, Wolfgang Bulfon, Giorgio Carollo, Bairbre de Brún, Gerardo Galeote, Iratxe García Pérez, Monica Giuntini, Ambroise Guellec, Pedro Guerreiro, Gábor Harangozó, Filiz Hakaeva Hyusmenova, Mieczysław Edmund Janowski, Gisela Kallenbach, Evgeni Kirilov, Miloš Koterec, Constanze Angela Krehl, Florencio Luque Aguilar, Jamila Madeira, Iosif Matula, Miroslav Mikolášik, Maria Petre, Markus Pieper, Giovanni Robusti, Wojciech Roszkowski, Bernard Soulage, Catherine Stihler, Margie Sudre, Lambert van Nistelrooij, Oldřich Vlasák

Substitute(s) present for the final vote

Emanuel Jardim Fernandes, Stanisław Jałowiecki, Zita Pleštinská, Samuli Pohjamo, Christa Prets, Flaviu Călin Rus, Richard Seeber, László Surján, Iuliu Winkler

Substitute(s) under Rule 178(2) present for the final vote

Wolf Klinz, Sepp Kusstatscher, Toine Manders


RESULT OF FINAL VOTE IN COMMITTEE

Date adopted

31.3.2009

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

28

1

2

Members present for the final vote

Gabriele Albertini, Inés Ayala Sender, Paolo Costa, Luis de Grandes Pascual, Petr Duchoň, Saïd El Khadraoui, Robert Evans, Emanuel Jardim Fernandes, Francesco Ferrari, Brigitte Fouré, Mathieu Grosch, Georg Jarzembowski, Timothy Kirkhope, Jaromír Kohlíček, Jörg Leichtfried, Eva Lichtenberger, Erik Meijer, Luís Queiró, Reinhard Rack, Ulrike Rodust, Gilles Savary, Brian Simpson, Dirk Sterckx, Ulrich Stockmann, Michel Teychenné, Yannick Vaugrenard, Armando Veneto, Roberts Zīle

Substitute(s) present for the final vote

Elisabeth Jeggle, Anne E. Jensen, Marie Panayotopoulos-Cassiotou

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