Procedure : 2012/2100(INI)
Document stages in plenary
Document selected : A7-0145/2013

Texts tabled :

A7-0145/2013

Debates :

PV 20/05/2013 - 25
CRE 20/05/2013 - 25

Votes :

PV 21/05/2013 - 6.9
Explanations of votes

Texts adopted :

P7_TA(2013)0199

REPORT     
PDF 183kWORD 122k
26.4.2013
PE 506.034v03-00 A7-0145/2013

on regional strategies for industrial areas in the European Union

(2012/2100(INI))

Committee on Regional Development

Rapporteur: Jens Geier

MOTION FOR A EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT RESOLUTION
 EXPLANATORY STATEMENT
 OPINION of the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety
 RESULT OF FINAL VOTE IN COMMITTEE
 RESULT OF FINAL VOTE IN COMMITTEE

MOTION FOR A EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT RESOLUTION

on regional strategies for industrial areas in the European Union

(2012/2100(INI))

The European Parliament,

–   having regard to Article 162 TFEU, which covers the objectives of the European Social Fund and refers, inter alia, to the objective of facilitating adaptation to industrial changes and to changes in production systems,

–   having regard to Articles 174 et seq. TFEU, which establish the objective of economic, social and territorial cohesion and define the structural financial instruments for achieving this,

–   having regard to Article 176 TFEU, which covers the European Regional Development Fund and refers, inter alia, to the development and structural adjustment of regions whose development is lagging behind and to the conversion of declining industrial regions,

–   having regard to Article 173 (Title XVII) TFEU, which covers EU industrial policy and refers, inter alia, to the competitiveness of the Union’s industry,

–   having regard to the Commission proposal of 9 September 2011 for a Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council laying down common provisions on the European Regional Development Fund, the European Social Fund, the Cohesion Fund, the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development and the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund covered by the Common Strategic Framework and laying down general provisions on the European Regional Development Fund, the European Social Fund and the Cohesion Fund and repealing Council Regulation (EC) No 1083/2006 (COM(2012)0496),

–   having regard to its resolution of 20 May 2010 on the implementation of the synergies of research and innovation earmarked Funds in Regulation (EC) No 1080/2006 concerning the European Regional Development Fund and the Seventh Framework Programme for Research and Development in cities and regions as well as in the Member States and the Union(1),

–   having regard to its resolution of 20 May 2010 on the contribution of the cohesion policy to the achievement of Lisbon and the EU 2020 objectives(2),

–   having regard to its resolution of 15 June 2010 on Community innovation policy in a changing world(3),

–   having regard to its resolution of 16 June 2010 on EU 2020(4),

–   having regard to its resolution of 7 October 2010 on EU cohesion and regional policy after 2013(5),

–   having regard to its resolution of 9 March 2011 on an Industrial Policy for the Globalised Era(6),

–   having regard to the conclusions of the meeting of the Council (3057th Competitiveness Council - Internal Market, Industry, Research and Space) held in Brussels on 10 December 2010 on ‘Industrial policy for the globalisation era’,

–   having regard to the Commission’s sixth progress report of 25 June 2009 on ‘Economic and social cohesion Creative and innovative regions’ (COM(2009)0295),

–   having regard to the Commission Staff Working Document of 30 July 2009 on ‘European Industry In A Changing World - Updated Sectoral Overview 2009’ (SEC(2009)1111),

–   having regard to the Commission communication of 23 September 2009, ‘Preparing for our future: Developing a common strategy for key enabling technologies in the EU’ (COM(2009)0512),

–   having regard to the Commission communication of 3 March 2010 entitled ‘Europe 2020 – A Strategy for Smart, Sustainable and Inclusive Growth’ (COM(2010)2020),

–   having regard to the Commission communication of 6 October 2010 entitled ‘Europe 2020 Flagship Initiative: Innovation Union’ (COM(2010)0546),

–   having regard to the Commission communication of 28 October 2010 entitled ‘An Integrated Industrial Policy for the Globalised Era Putting Competitiveness and Sustainability at Centre Stage’ (COM(2010)0614),

–   having regard to the Commission communication of 9 November 2010 entitled ‘Conclusions of the fifth report on economic, social and territorial cohesion: the future of cohesion policy’ (COM(2010)0642),

–   having regard to the Commission communication of 14 October 2011 entitled ‘Industrial Policy: Reinforcing Competitiveness - Member States’ competitiveness performance and policies 2011’ (COM(2011)0642),

–   having regard to the Commission Staff Working Document of 14 March 2012 on ‘Elements for a Common Strategic Framework 2014 to 2020: the European Regional Development Fund the European Social Fund, the Cohesion Fund, the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development and the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund’ (SWD(2012)0061),

–   having regard to the Commission Staff Working Document of 24 April 2012 on ‘The partnership principle in the implementation of the Common Strategic Framework Funds - elements for a European Code of Conduct on Partnership’ (SWD(2012)0106),

–   having regard to the Commission communication of 10 0ctober 2012 entitled ‘A Stronger European Industry for Growth and Economic Recovery. Industrial Policy Communication Update’ (COM (2012)0582),

–   having regard to the Commission Staff Working Document of 10 October 2012 on the European Competitiveness Report (SWD(2012)0299),

–   having regard to the Commission Staff Working Document entitled ‘Industrial Performance Scoreboard and Member States’ Competitiveness Performance and Policies’ (SWD(2012)0298),

–   having regard to the opinion of the European Economic and Social Committee (EESC) of 26 May 2010 on ‘The need to apply an integrated approach to urban regeneration’(7),

–   having regard to the opinion of the European Economic and Social Committee on the Commission communication ‘An Integrated Industrial Policy for the Globalisation Era: Putting Competitiveness and Sustainability at Centre Stage’ (CCMI/083 - CESE 808/2011),

–   having regard to Rule 48 of its Rules of Procedure,

–   having regard to the report of the Committee on Regional Development and the opinion of the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety (A7-0145/2013),

A.  whereas the term ‘industry’ is not clearly defined and may include a wide variety of sectors;

B.   whereas industry is unquestionably one of our main assets at international level, without which the EU would not play such an important role in the global balance of economic forces;

C.  whereas the industrial sector could play a leading role in the economy of the EU, given that the Commission estimates that for every 100 jobs created in industry, between 60 to 200 new jobs can be created in the rest of the economy; whereas, however, between 2008 and 2011, industrial production fell from 20 % to 16 % of the EU's GDP and the number of jobs in the sector fell by 11 %;

D.  whereas the Commission seeks to reverse the decline of industry in the EU and to bring it back from its current level of around 16 % of GDP to as high as 20 % by 2020; whereas industry is the main destination for private and public investment in research, development and innovation;

E.   whereas cohesion policy can help address the structural challenges facing EU industry, and can contribute to achieving the ambitious objectives of the Europe 2020 Strategy, including the shift towards a sustainable, low-carbon, energy-efficient and inclusive economy that fosters knowledge and employment;

F.   whereas many old industrialised regions in Europe face similar problems, having had long periods of growth in the past followed by severe economic decline in recent years;

G.  whereas, owing to their economic interdependence and shared features, the component parts of many cross-border regions – for example, traditional mining, steelmaking and textile manufacturing regions – are faced with the same industrial challenges;

H.  whereas industrial policy tends to focus on the specific day-to-day problems of industry, and its strong impact on regions is therefore often overlooked;

I.    whereas research has shown that the restructuring of old industrialised regions calls for a broad approach, and administrative obstacles can hinder achieving this;

J.    whereas Member States, regions and cities in the EU are facing financial constraints; whereas, in particular, areas with an old industrial base are often not well positioned to attract sufficient funds for conversion; whereas EU funding to aid reconversion and restructuring efforts is indispensable for supporting regional and crossborder policy approaches;

K.  whereas cities are drivers of innovation and sustainable growth, and have the important task of addressing challenges in old industrialised areas;

L.   whereas new and innovative integrated approaches, also facilitated by appropriate legislative policy frameworks and smart specialisation strategies, are needed to help regions and cities fulfil their innovation potential and refocus their industrial assets in the direction of emerging industries and services and globalised markets;

M.  whereas reindustrialisation policies fail to take proper account of the cultural and creative industries, which are a key potential source of growth, innovation and jobs, contribute to social cohesion and provide an effective means of combating the current recession;

1.   Draws attention to the existing resources made available through cohesion policy and the Structural Funds, capitalising on the European Investment Bank's financial engineering schemes, as well as the national, regional and municipal economic development policies in support of the reconversion of old industrial areas and the reindustrialisation of crisis-stricken industrial areas, the aim being to achieve a modern and sustainable reindustrialisation; regrets, however, that these options do not always address the real region-specific problems and that the structural and investment funding made available is not fully taken up by Member States and regions at a time when industry is being hit hard by the crisis;

2.   Points out that further aid measures to assist old industrialised regions, particularly mono-industrialised regions, need to be put into place so that they can successfully find new development paths focusing on creative and cultural industries and can promote the use of unoccupied sites, which can play a key role in brownfield redevelopment;

3.   Calls for more integrated and systemic approaches to industrial renewal and regional development, and for increased coherence between the different policies at EU, national, regional, interregional and crossborder level, in order to ensure that the potential of the European industrial sector is exploited; stresses the need to create economic zones of regional importance and hi-tech parks on a basis of public-private partnerships, and to contribute to improving the use of local and regional human and economic resources using the latest technologies;

4.   Stresses that the success of such an industrial renewal coupled with regional development will depend on the existence of effective policies in areas such as cohesion policy, economic governance, competitiveness, research and innovation, energy, the digital agenda, sustainable development, the cultural and creative industries, new qualifications and jobs, etc;

5.   Believes that the main challenges for old industrialised regions lie in:

•    the physical regeneration of land;

•    the regeneration of housing and social infrastructure;

•    the renewal of infrastructure, oriented to the needs of new industries;

•    the development of broadband infrastructure, which adds to an area's attractiveness;

•    the need for vocational retraining of jobless workers and lifelong learning efforts to create jobs focusing on high-quality technological education for the workforce, especially young people;

•    the stimulation of crossborder employment, innovation, training, environmental rehabilitation and regional attractiveness strategies;

•    the need to promote entrepreneurship with tailor-made Union employment strategies and to adapt social skills, qualifications and entrepreneurship to the new demands arising as a result of economic, technological, professional and environmental challenges;

•    the sustainable rehabilitation of the areas concerned, with it being guaranteed that green areas are included wherever possible;

•    reinventing of the economic base and investment conditions;

•    the treatment of ecologically-linked problems;

•    financial obstacles and the lack of direct financing possibilities;

•    the building-up of smart specialisation solutions for industrial renewal and economic diversification;

6.   Stresses that regional strategies for industrial areas should include, as a focal point, measures to protect land, water and air quality, to safeguard regional and local biodiversity and natural resources, and to clean up land and water, so that environmentally harmful substances do not continue to leak into the natural environment;

7.   Believes it is important that strategies for industrial areas include an integrated focus on possible forms of sustainable transport to and from those areas, including raw materials, goods and personnel as well as the necessary infrastructure, be it existing or planned, and that such a focus can help reduce the environmental footprint of industrial and urban areas and ensure that community needs are met, while at the same time safeguarding natural resources and capital and making a positive contribution to human health;

8.   Takes the view that as a result of the enlargement process of the EU regional disparities have increased, and thus attention and public awareness have shifted away from old industrialised regions which lack sufficient investment opportunities for concrete regional development strategies;

9.   Calls on the Commission to assess the present situation in old industrialised regions, identify their main challenges, and provide information and guidance for those regions, in order to develop, by means of democratic procedures, regional strategies based on broad partnerships which can help improve those regions’ sustainable development prospects by harnessing their endogenous potential;

10. Stresses that strengthening the industrial basis of the economy is necessary for progress in economic growth and job creation, as well as for achieving the EU 2020 goals and targets, and that industry-related assets in terms of cultural, historic and architectural heritage and the expertise available in old industrialised regions can form an irreplaceable basis for this, and should be preserved and adapted to the new needs;

11. Notes that many former industrial areas offer great possibilities for increasing energy efficiency through the application of modern technology and building standards, and that this will benefit both the regional economies concerned and the environment;

12. Reiterates that where old industrialised regions have tried to explore new opportunities for regional development, they have been most successful where they have based these strategies on their past features, their territorial assets, their industrial heritage, and their experiences and capacities;

13. Points out that urban areas play an important role in terms of innovation and sustainable growth, and that reconversion efforts cannot succeed without sufficient investment in this field, since without action on buildings and city transport the EU's targets will not be achieved;

14. Takes the view that the decline in most of the old industrialised regions is partly due to the reliance on monostructures; believes that to base an economy solely on monostructures is counterproductive and that a diversified economy is of the utmost importance as a basis for sustainable growth and job creation;

15. Calls on the Commission to develop political concepts and instruments which combine the Cohesion Fund and the Structural Funds with industrial policy approaches, in order to support the structural transformation from old industrialised regions to modern industrial regions;

16. Believes that regional industrial strategies must be based on an integrated approach, including an employment, training, and education component, aimed at promoting growth sectors capable of creating sustainable local and regional jobs, especially for young people, e.g. in innovative SMEs, as part of the programme for the competitiveness of enterprises and SMEs (COSME); highlights the special role cities play in developing regional strategies for industrial areas; believes in this framework that cities are central to achieving smart growth; underlines, therefore, the fact that, in particular, cities with an old industrialised base offer an enormous potential, which the EU should explore to the full; calls on the Commission to engage in closer dialogue with the cities concerned with a view to raising the profile of cities as direct partners of the EU;

17. Stresses that support for energy-efficient building renovation, in particular, will help regions to reduce carbon emissions, create local jobs and save consumers money on heating bills;

18. Calls on the Commission to capitalise on synergies between cohesion and industrial policies in order to support competitiveness and growth and assist Member States, regions and cities to find a basis for regional-led industrial development strategies;

19. Believes that no specific blueprint for regional strategies for industrial areas for the EU as a whole exists, and that a local and regional approach is most suitable for developing regional strategies; calls on the Commission to support regional economic research in the context of the initiative Horizon 2020, which enables the development of regionally adjusted strategies for additional old industrialised regions;

20. Highlights the fact that regions’ characteristics have to be taken into consideration when planning regional development strategies; in this context and having regard to the model that bottom-up rural (LEADER) development strategies provide for rural areas, considers that bottom-up local development initiatives for urban areas should be encouraged;

21. Calls on the Commission to use the past experiences of urban areas such as Manchester in the UK, Lille in France, Essen and the Ruhr area in Germany and Bilbao in Spain, where EU financing has contributed to the reconversion and restructuring of old industrialised regions, in order to develop future strategies for other regions in the EU;

22. Welcomes the benefits deriving from European Capital of Culture status, as exemplified by Glasgow, Lille, and other cities and urban agglomerations formerly suffering from industrial decline, and maintains that culture and creative activity are key catalysts for urban regeneration and regional attractiveness;

23. Stresses that the sustainable regeneration of old industrialised regions takes decades and is very costly, often exceeding the administrative and financial capacities of in situ public bodies; points to the need, therefore, to develop technical assistance to regional and local authorities and public bodies;

24. Emphasises that the new instrument for ‘Integrated Territorial Investment’ proposed in Article 99 of the draft Common Provisions Regulation for the new funding period 2014-2020 could offer an opportunity for developing regional strategies beyond administrative borders;

25. Calls on the Member States to avoid over-complex rules for beneficiaries; reiterates that where EU rules exist domestic rules can be eliminated, in order to avoid duplicated or conflicting rules;

26. Calls on the Commission to create a database of existing industry parks and regional activity areas, with a view to identifying the best models that could also be used in other regions and tailoring them to local and regional long-term development strategies, and to provide guidance on how to use funds for assisting in the reconversion process;

27. Takes the view that more support should be given to developing the entrepreneurial spirit among young people, through access to EU funds and business advice;

28. Calls on the Member States to ensure that old industrialised regions can fully benefit from national and European funds, so that the EU can start off a ‘new industrial revolution’;

29. Stresses the need for the further concentration of cohesion policy support on industrial reconversion in the regions, in the following areas: business innovation and investment, social inclusion, integrated approaches to urban development, and urban regeneration;

30. Calls on the Member States to support their regions in participating in the ‘smart specialisation’ approach; reiterates that regions need tailor-made sustainable development strategies in order to be successful; notes that in many cases local public bodies cannot acquire the necessary know-how and experience without support from the Commission and the Member States;

31. Takes the view that it is necessary to create industrial areas that will boost the development of cities; maintains that more emphasis should be placed on research activities, innovation and learning, recalling the creative role of universities in this respect; supports the creation of Innovation, Competitiveness and Entrepreneurship networks at regional level with a view to encouraging increased links between universities, businesses and knowledge centres, thus fostering new industrial activities to encourage the development of sectoral specialisation strategies and promote the formation of industrial clusters; calls on the Commission and the Member States concerned to insist on greater transparency in the allocation of means to the relevant stakeholders;

32. Instructs its President to forward this resolution to the Council, the Commission and the Member States.

(1)

Texts adopted, P7_TA(2010)0189.

(2)

Texts adopted, P7_TA(2010)0191.

(3)

Texts adopted, P7_TA(2010)0209.

(4)

Texts adopted, P7_TA(2010)0053.

(5)

Texts adopted, P7_TA(2010)0356.

(6)

Texts adopted, P7_TA(2011)0093.

(7)

OJ C 21, 21.1.2011, p.1


EXPLANATORY STATEMENT

•   Introduction and General Background

Article 173 of the Treaty of the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) states that: “The Union and the Member States shall ensure that the conditions necessary for the competitiveness of the Union’s industry exist”. The European Union’s industrial sector has always been a driving force in creating jobs, growth and promoting innovation in all regions of the European Union. Whereas the origins of the European Union lie in the formation of the European Coal and Steel Community (ECSC) in 1952, the long-lasting close cooperation of EU member states in supporting industrial innovation has shaped the European Union ever since.

Although the industrial sector in the EU has declined in the last 50 years, European industry still amounts to approximately 16% of the EU’s GDP. However, due to the decline of many traditional industries, such as coal, steel, textiles or machinery, which had contributed to prosperity of many regions over several decades, a number of regions in the European Union face similar problems today. Many regions in the European Union are, therefore, dependent on European funding as a support for the reconversion and restructuring of their old industrialised areas.

In this context, it becomes manifest that, against the backdrop of the financial and economic crisis, the high ambitions of EU industrial policy and of the EU2020 strategy cannot be delivered by the sectoral policies alone - support from Cohesion policy measures has become increasingly important.

EU Cohesion policy funding intervenes where private investors do not and seeks to influence industrial policy and economic, social and territorial development, especially by improving the determinants of location and investment. It also supports upgrading of industrial structures through technology transfer and the development of new industries for the future.

Your Rapporteur therefore, focuses on the main challenges of structural transformation processes in old industrialised regions in the European Union and the role EU Cohesion policy can play in this context. By doing so, the report identifies three main objectives:

o where is regional funding most needed in old industrialised regions

o which successful regional strategies for undertaking structural change exist

o how the Cohesion policy funds can be further used to support industrial regeneration

•   The Relevance of the Industrial Sector for Growth and Development

The Rapporteur focuses on old industrialised regions, which were particularly exposed to the radical decline in traditional industries in the last decades and therefore, need particular support. He furthermore, points out that new instruments, proposed in the draft Common Provisions Regulation for the new funding period 2014-2020, could offer the opportunity to overcome administrative borders and assist in the reconversion process. Additionally, the Rapporteur highlights a number of case studies, which put forward good-practice examples of Cohesion policy interventions for industrial restructuring and reconversion.

•   Developing Regional Strategies for Old Industrial Areas

Your Rapporteur stresses the need for assistance when developing regional strategies for old industrialised areas. In the first step the Commission should assess the present situation in old industrialised regions and analyse the economic, social and ecological challenges at stage. This approach allows the Rapporteur to present ideas on how these challenges and obstacles can be overcome by developing well structured regional strategies. Despite the fact that it is undeniable that every region has its own specificity and there is no “blueprint” for a regional strategy for industrial areas, the initiative report intends to point out common features of all old industrialised regions and identify solution opportunities.

In addition, the Rapporteur examines the different policy instruments Cohesion policy offers to tackle the challenges of old industrialised areas. The initiative report highlights that sustainable regeneration of old industrialised regions is very costly and therefore, European public funding needs to play an important role in possible future attempts to reconvert old industrialised regions.

Finally, the Rapporteur illustrates this by emphasising the successes of the development strategies of cities with an old industrial legacy like Manchester, Essen, Lille and Bilbao. He points out that, due to the enlargement process of the EU, regional disparities increased and thus, public awareness has shifted away from old industrialised areas.

Drawing further attention to the problems of old industrialised areas on the one hand and highlighting examples of successful conversion strategies on the other hand contributes to the Rapporteur’s project and primary intention when embarking on the drafting of this report, namely to bring a contribution to and shape the decision-making process in support of future integrated territorial investment and policy delivery for the 2014-2020 period.


OPINION of the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety (20.3.2013)

for the Committee on Regional Development

on regional strategies for industrial areas in the European Union

(2012/2100(INI))

Rapporteur: Anna Rosbach

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety calls on the Committee on Regional Development, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions in its motion for a resolution:

1.  Recalls that the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF), the Cohesion Fund and the Structural Funds are meant to contribute, alongside national funding, to, among other things, accelerating the implementation of EU legislation on renewable energy and energy efficiency; supports, therefore, the promotion by local and regional authorities of energy and resource efficiency, of long-term, cost-effective development strategies and of a green economy based on more sustainable production and consumption patterns;

2.  Stresses that support for energy-efficient building renovation, in particular, will help regions to reduce carbon emissions, to create local jobs and to save consumers money on heating bills;

3.  Notes that local and regional authorities in industrial areas should look to exploit synergies between national and EU public funding and private investment in financing energy and infrastructure projects, as a means of supporting innovation, research and development; believes that increased public and private investment in the green agenda in industrial areas can generate employment and growth through eco-innovation, environmental technologies, renewable energy and the development of the environmental goods and services market; notes that the EU needs to mobilise all the policies and instruments at its disposal at the European level, such as the internal market, environmental and climate policy, research and innovation, trade and competition policy and the development of SMEs, in order to foster the creation of high-value jobs with a view to meeting future societal challenges;

4.  Stresses that while the restructuring of industrial areas can be expensive, it should as far as possible be done in a budget-neutral manner, i.e. by focusing on funds and support mechanisms already in place;

5.  Notes that many industrial regions have managed to create green jobs by giving large firms in sustainable industries financial incentives to relocate or stay in their areas; urges the Commission to continue to allow local authorities to give state aid to large firms, and not to withdraw this option in the 2014-2020 regional state aid guidelines;

6.  Emphasises that by focusing on the added value of all segments of the population, it is possible to adapt and enhance strategies, to stimulate each segment as a source of innovation and growth and to tackle societal challenges; takes the view that any regional strategy for industrial areas which overlooks age and gender differences may result in missed business opportunities;

7.  Stresses that regional strategies for industrial areas should include, as a focal point, measures to protect land, water and air quality, to safeguard regional and local biodiversity and natural resources and to clean up land and water, so that environmentally harmful substances do not continue to leak into the natural environment; stresses that regional strategies should therefore consider measures which support the aims and goals of the Waste Framework Directive, the Water Framework Directive and the Air Quality Directive; takes the view that these strategies must, moreover, seek to protect and conserve the environment and physical spaces, and at the same time ensure a higher level of environmental efficiency and sustainability;

8.  Believes it is important that strategies for industrial areas include an integrated focus on possible forms of sustainable transport to and from those areas, including raw materials, goods and personnel as well as the necessary infrastructure, be it existing or planned, and that such a focus can help reduce the environmental footprint of industrial and urban areas and ensure that community needs are met, while at the same time safeguarding natural resources and capital and making a positive contribution to human health;

9.  Believes that an increased focus on, and the promotion of, best practice as regards transport using internal waterways, ocean transport, railway goods transport and smart distribution centres and networks are essential to improving the environment in regional industrial areas;

10. Underlines the importance of effective transposition by Member States of the Seveso III Directive, in order to ensure that possible risks to citizens living in close proximity to the industrial regions concerned are minimised, and that citizens have adequate information regarding any possible risks and are more closely involved in land‑use planning decisions, so as to make those decisions more sustainable and minimise potential trade-offs between social, economic and environmental objectives and needs; calls for the exchange of best practice as regards the best means of separating industrial and residential areas in this respect; lastly, advocates urging regional governments, in accordance with EU law, to draw up the aforementioned strategies in cooperation with groups and associations representing citizens, as part of cross-cutting decision‑making in which citizens play a full part as partners at all stages in a reform process involving the general public;

11. Notes that many former and outdated industrial areas hold great possibilities for increasing energy efficiency by applying modern technology and building standards, and that this will benefit both the regional economies concerned and the environment;

12. Points to the possibility of acquiring funds for green investment by selling off former industrial properties in attractive locations, e.g. in port areas or along river banks, and notes that this may reduce the need for public funding.


RESULT OF FINAL VOTE IN COMMITTEE

Date adopted

20.3.2013

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

58

0

0

Members present for the final vote

Martina Anderson, Elena Oana Antonescu, Kriton Arsenis, Sophie Auconie, Pilar Ayuso, Paolo Bartolozzi, Sergio Berlato, Lajos Bokros, Milan Cabrnoch, Yves Cochet, Chris Davies, Esther de Lange, Anne Delvaux, Bas Eickhout, Edite Estrela, Jill Evans, Elisabetta Gardini, Gerben-Jan Gerbrandy, Matthias Groote, Françoise Grossetête, Satu Hassi, Jolanta Emilia Hibner, Karin Kadenbach, Christa Klaß, Eija-Riitta Korhola, Jo Leinen, Peter Liese, Zofija Mazej Kukovič, Linda McAvan, Radvilė Morkūnaitė-Mikulėnienė, Miroslav Ouzký, Vladko Todorov Panayotov, Antonyia Parvanova, Andrés Perelló Rodríguez, Mario Pirillo, Pavel Poc, Anna Rosbach, Oreste Rossi, Horst Schnellhardt, Richard Seeber, Bogusław Sonik, Salvatore Tatarella, Thomas Ulmer, Glenis Willmott, Sabine Wils

Substitute(s) present for the final vote

Margrete Auken, Minodora Cliveti, Gaston Franco, Julie Girling, Philippe Juvin, Jiří Maštálka, James Nicholson, Britta Reimers, Michèle Rivasi, Rebecca Taylor, Vladimir Urutchev, Kathleen Van Brempt

Substitute(s) under Rule 187(2) present for the final vote

Ioan Enciu


RESULT OF FINAL VOTE IN COMMITTEE

Date adopted

23.4.2013

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

41

1

0

Members present for the final vote

Luís Paulo Alves, Catherine Bearder, Jean-Jacob Bicep, Victor Boştinaru, Nikos Chrysogelos, Ryszard Czarnecki, Rosa Estaràs Ferragut, Danuta Maria Hübner, Vincenzo Iovine, María Irigoyen Pérez, Seán Kelly, Constanze Angela Krehl, Petru Constantin Luhan, Ramona Nicole Mănescu, Riikka Manner, Iosif Matula, Jens Nilsson, Jan Olbrycht, Wojciech Michał Olejniczak, Younous Omarjee, Markus Pieper, Monika Smolková, Georgios Stavrakakis, Csanád Szegedi, Nuno Teixeira, Lambert van Nistelrooij, Justina Vitkauskaite, Oldřich Vlasák, Kerstin Westphal, Joachim Zeller, Elżbieta Katarzyna Łukacijewska

Substitute(s) present for the final vote

Joseph Cuschieri, Karima Delli, James Nicholson, Ivari Padar, Herbert Reul, Elisabeth Schroedter, Czesław Adam Siekierski, Patrice Tirolien, Giommaria Uggias, Manfred Weber

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