Níl an doiciméad seo ar fáil i do theanga féin. Roghnaítear teanga eile as na teangacha atá ar fáil.

Nós Imeachta : 2019/2213(BUD)
Céimeanna an doiciméid sa chruinniú iomlánach
An doiciméad roghnaithe : A9-0110/2020

Téacsanna arna gcur síos :

A9-0110/2020

Díospóireachtaí :

Vótaí :

Téacsanna arna nglacadh :

P9_TA(2020)0166

<Date>{03/06/2020}3.6.2020</Date>
<NoDocSe>A9-0110/2020</NoDocSe>
PDF 379kWORD 137k

<TitreType>REPORT</TitreType>

<Titre>on general guidelines for the preparation of the 2021 budget, Section III – Commission</Titre>

<DocRef>(2019/2213(BUD))</DocRef>


<Commission>{BUDG}Committee on Budgets</Commission>

Rapporteur: <Depute>Pierre Larrouturou</Depute>

MOTION FOR A EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT RESOLUTION
 OPINION OF THE COMMITTEE ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS
 DRAFT POSITION IN THE FORM OF AMENDMENTS OF THE COMMITTEE ON EMPLOYMENT AND SOCIAL AFFAIRS
 LETTER OF THE COMMITTEE ON DEVELOPMENT
 LETTER OF THE COMMITTEE ON BUDGETARY CONTROL
 LETTER OF THE COMMITTEE ON THE ENVIRONMENT, PUBLIC HEALTH AND FOOD SAFETY
 LETTER OF THE COMMITTEE ON INDUSTRY, RESEARCH AND ENERGY
 LETTER OF THE COMMITTEE ON THE INTERNAL MARKET AND CONSUMER PROTECTION
 LETTER OF THE COMMITTEE ON TRANSPORT AND TOURISM
 LETTER OF THE COMMITTEE ON REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT
 LETTER OF THE COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT
 LETTER OF THE COMMITTEE ON CULTURE AND EDUCATION
 LETTER OF THE COMMITTEE ON CIVIL LIBERTIES, JUSTICE AND HOME AFFAIRS
 LETTER OF THE COMMITTEE ON CONSTITUTIONAL AFFAIRS
 LETTER OF THE COMMITTEE ON WOMEN'S RIGHTS AND GENDER EQUALITY
 INFORMATION ON ADOPTION IN COMMITTEE RESPONSIBLE
 FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE RESPONSIBLE

MOTION FOR A EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT RESOLUTION

on general guidelines for the preparation of the 2021 budget, Section III – Commission

(2019/2213(BUD))

The European Parliament,

 having regard to the special report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) of 8 October 2018 on Global Warming of 1.5°C[1],

 having regard to Article 314 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU),

 having regard to Article 106a of the Treaty establishing the European Atomic Energy Community,

 having regard to Regulation (EU, Euratom) 2018/1046 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 18 July 2018 on the financial rules applicable to the general budget of the Union, amending Regulations (EU) No 1296/2013, (EU) No 1301/2013, (EU) No 1303/2013, (EU) No 1304/2013, (EU) No 1309/2013, (EU) No 1316/2013, (EU) No 223/2014, (EU) No 283/2014, and Decision No 541/2014/EU and repealing Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 966/2012[2],

 having regard to Council Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 1311/2013 of 2 December 2013 laying down the multiannual financial framework for the years 2014-2020[3],

 having regard to the Interinstitutional Agreement of 2 December 2013 between the European Parliament, the Council and the Commission on budgetary discipline, on cooperation in budgetary matters and on sound financial management[4],

 having regard to Council Decision 2014/335/EU, Euratom of 26 May 2014 on the system of own resources of the European Union[5],

 having regard to the general budget of the European Union for the financial year 2020[6] and the joint statements agreed between Parliament, the Council and the Commission annexed thereto,

 having regard to its interim report of 14 November 2018 on the multiannual financial framework 2021-2027 – Parliament’s position with a view to an agreement[7] and to its resolution of 10 October 2019 on the 2021-2027 multiannual financial framework and own resources: time to meet citizens’ expectations[8],

 having regard to its resolution of 17 April 2020 on EU coordinated action to combat the COVID-19 pandemic and its consequences[9],

 having regard to its resolution of 13 May 2020 on a safety net to protect the beneficiaries of Union programmes: setting up an MFF contingency plan[10],

 having regard to its resolution of 15 May 2020 on the new multiannual financial framework, own resources and the recovery plan[11],

 having regard to its resolution of 16 January 2020 on the 15th meeting of the Conference of Parties (COP15) to the Convention on Biological Diversity[12],

 having regard to the European Pillar of Social Rights, and its resolution thereon of 19 January 2017[13],

 having regard to its resolution of 15 January 2020 on the European Green Deal[14],

 having regard to the Council conclusions of 18 February 2020 on the 2021 budget guidelines (06092/2020),

 having regard to the UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development,

 having regard to Rule 93 of its Rules of Procedure,

 having regard to the opinion of the Committee on Foreign Affairs,

 having regard to the position in the form of amendments of the Committee on Employment and Social Affairs,

 having regard to the letters from the Committee on Development; the Committee on Budgetary Control; the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety; the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy; the Committee on the Internal Market and Consumer Protection; the Committee on Transport and Tourism; the Committee on Regional Development; the Committee on Agriculture and Rural Development; the Committee on Culture and Education; the Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs; the Committee on Constitutional Affairs and the Committee on Women’s Rights and Gender Equality,

 having regard to the report of the Committee on Budgets (A9-0110/2020),

A. whereas the European Union is facing an unexpected and unprecedented health, economic, social and environmental crisis due to the coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic;

B. whereas these exceptional circumstances cannot be tackled with a budget designed for ‘business as usual’;

C. whereas pursuant to Article 311 of the TFEU, the Union shall provide itself with the means necessary to attain its policy objectives and the budget shall be financed wholly from own resources;

D. whereas pursuant to Article 312 of the TFEU, the multiannual financial framework (MFF) shall be adopted by the Council by unanimity after obtaining the consent of the European Parliament by a majority of its component members;

E. whereas the current MFF ends at the end of 2020, and whereas 2021 should be the first year of implementation of the next one in a revised and reshaped form;

F. whereas Parliament has been ready to negotiate the MFF since November 2018, but the Council has so far failed to engage in any meaningful talks with Parliament beyond minimal contact on the margins of the General Affairs Council; whereas the timeframe for reaching an agreement in the European Council has been repeatedly extended;

G. whereas on 27 May 2020, the Commission presented an updated proposal for the next MFF;

H. whereas IPCC scientists, in their latest report, call for radical action to catch up with the ecological transition, in the light of their warning that CO2 concentration increased three times faster in 2018-2019 than in the 1960s, underlining the fact that there are only a few years left to prevent climate change and its environmental impact from getting irreversibly out of control;

I. whereas in the context of the COVID-19 outbreak, victims of gender-based violence can be exposed to abusers for long periods of time and be cut off from social and institutional support, as demonstrated by the data in several EU countries, and whereas women are disproportionally represented in professions where the risk of getting infected is high;

Facing the COVID-19 crisis: a budget to protect and innovate…

1. Insists that the EU budget is vital to respond to the challenges faced by the Union and made even more visible and acute by the COVID-19 crisis, and that it needs to reflect the degree of ambition of the Member States and the institutions; stresses, therefore, that the primary focus of the 2021 budget should be to mitigate the effects of the COVID-19 outbreak and support the recovery, built on the European Green Deal and digital transformation;

2. Emphasises that the Union and all of its Member States must show full solidarity with those most in need, pulling together as a community and ensuring that no country is left to fight this pandemic and its aftermath on its own, including through a 2021 budget commensurate with this historical challenge;

3. Highlights, in this context, that the 2021 budget should be the first of an updated, reoriented and very ambitious 2021-2027 MFF;

4. In line with its resolution of 13 May 2020, reiterates its request that the Commission propose an MFF contingency plan by 15 June 2020, on the basis of the automatic extension of the 2020 ceilings, in order to protect beneficiaries of EU programmes and ensure continuity of funding; stresses that this MFF contingency plan should allow for the prolongation of existing EU programmes and their refocusing on addressing the consequences of the crisis, as well as for setting up the most urgent new instruments and initiatives; underlines the need to avoid any risk of discontinuity or a disorderly extension of the current MFF and programmes in 2021, and to guarantee that the Union will be enabled to carry out its operations and to provide an ambitious crisis response and recovery strategy;

5. Underlines that no Member State on its own will be able to finance a massive recovery plan, as long as needed, to face the COVID-19 crisis and that, if financed solely with debt, national recovery plans would be very limited in amount and duration; insists that the recovery plan must comprise a massive investment component financed by the Union budget as of 2021, and calls, therefore, for the 2021 budget to be an important part of this recovery plan;

6. Believes that the recovery plan needs to be built on the European Green Deal and digital transformation of our societies to rebuild our economy, ensure resilience and inclusion, while respecting planetary boundaries, protect people’s wellbeing and health from further risks and environmental impacts, create high-quality jobs and ensure social, economic and territorial cohesion and convergence, notably through investment in SMEs and the sectors most affected by the crisis such as tourism, and in the development of sustainable public infrastructure and services and of the strategic sectors, such as the health sector, that tackle the crisis on the front line; calls on the Commission to introduce a draft 2021 budget that is line with these priorities;

7. Considers that the EU budget’s revenue side must be seen as a tool for the achievement of EU policies; underlines that, in order to cover supplementary expenditure incurred by the crisis and to mitigate the predominance of the GNI contributions in the EU budget, new additional own resources flowing directly into the EU budget as general revenue will need to play a key role as of 2021; considers that the absence of fresh new own resources will have negative political consequences on the 2021 Union budget and jeopardise the new political agenda of the Commission; considers, in this context, the Commission’s proposals on own resources from May 2018 as a good starting point that needs to be broadly deepened in the light of the current challenges and crisis; recalls, as expressed in its interim report of 14 November 2018 and its resolution of 10 October 2019, that the European Parliament will not give its consent to the 2021-2027 MFF without an agreement on the reform of the EU own resources system, including the introduction of a basket of new own resources;

8. Is convinced that the current crisis should not undermine the ambition of moving towards the objective of achieving climate neutrality by 2050, requiring a cut in greenhouse gas emissions by 55 % compared with 1990 levels by 2030; recalls that the 2019 Emissions Gap Report of the UN Environment Programme (UNEP) calls for a global reduction of greenhouse gases of 7.6 % each year to limit the temperature rise to under 1.5°C, meaning a reduction of approximately 6.8 % each year at EU level; highlights that it represents an enormous challenge, notably with regard to the much-needed sustainable, socially just transition, which should take into account the different starting points of the EU regions and Member States and be accompanied by job creation on a massive scale; insists that in order to succeed in this unprecedented challenge in only ten years, urgent action is needed, backed by a strong EU budget as of 2021;

9. Is concerned about further economic, social and political consequences of the crisis if the EU does not equip itself quickly with new and efficient tools to protect social cohesion, preserve jobs and prevent massive layoffs; welcomes, in this context, the proposal for a Support to mitigate Unemployment Risks in an Emergency (SURE) programme and the commitment by the President of the Commission to present a legislative proposal for a European Unemployment Benefit Reinsurance scheme with a view to implementing it as soon as possible;

…in order to provide solutions to exacerbated social, environmental, economic and financial challenges

10. Welcomes the Commission’s proposals for the European Green Deal and the Sustainable Europe Investment Plan;

11. Notes, however, that in order to attain the 40 % greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction target by 2030, and the upcoming raising of this ambition, the Commission has estimated that it will be necessary to bridge a funding gap of at least EUR 260 billion every year plus additional costs for environmental protection, resource management and social adaptation measures; believes that in order to help reduce the EU’s GHG emissions and overall carbon footprint, a carbon border adjustment mechanism (CBAM), the EU Emissions Trading System (ETS) and EU climate law should fully contribute to a quantum leap in political and financial efforts; considers that a just transition, as an inherent part of the answer to the crisis, requires just and adequate funding;

12. Reiterates that Parliament’s mandate for the MFF was set in its interim report of 14 November 2018 on ceilings, programme allocations, own resources and flexibility provisions, the mid-term revision and horizontal principles, such as mainstreaming the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and climate and gender equality; notes that the outcome of the MFF negotiations will largely determine the funding level of EU programmes for the next period and reiterates its position that commitment appropriations for the 2021-2027 period should be set at EUR 1 324.1 billion in 2018 prices, which would represent 1.3 % of the EU-27’s gross national income (GNI); reflecting this position, is determined to defend a 2021 budget of EUR 192.1 billion in current prices in commitment appropriations; underlines that major additional appropriations on top of this position are required to respond to the ongoing crisis;

13. Recalls its position that the 2021-2027 MFF climate and biodiversity mainstreaming targets must go beyond the levels of targeted spending shares as set out in its interim report; aims, therefore, to achieve a biodiversity spending level of 10 % and a climate mainstreaming spending level of 30 % for 2021; reiterates its call on the Commission to lay down clear eligibility criteria for a new stringent and comprehensive methodology, in the form of a Framework Regulation, for defining and tracking relevant climate and biodiversity expenditure in line with the ‘do no harm’ principle, together with the corresponding correction measures, where relevant, and the proofing mechanism to identify potential harmful impacts of EU actions on biodiversity and climate in keeping with its commitments under the Paris Agreement and its call for a progressive phase-out of direct and indirect fossil fuel subsidies;

14. Supports the mobilisations of funds and the flexibility to mobilise funds for research and development (R&D) to COVID-19-related measures such as the development of vaccines, new treatments, diagnostic tests and medical systems to prevent the spread of the coronavirus and save lives;

15. Strongly underlines that the Union`s climate goals require sustainable and long-term solutions; highlights the paramount role of R&D in finding effective, realistic and implementable solutions for citizens, businesses and society; underlines that Horizon Europe will be the main programme for developing new solutions for the climate; requests increased funding for all contributing R&D programmes in order to establish the Union as a global leader for green technologies and strengthen its global competitiveness on a greater scale, to reduce its dependency on foreign key technologies, to become a leader in information and communication technologies (ICTs), artificial intelligence (AI) and cybersecurity, to develop new treatments for serious diseases such as cancer, and to build up supercomputing and data processing capacities;

16. Notes with great concern that many excellent proposals for research cannot be implemented, not because of bad quality, but due to significant under-funding of the relevant programmes; stresses that research and innovation are very competitive markets, with researchers being drawn to other regions of the world as a result of the unavailability of funding opportunities in Europe; underlines that the UK will move from being the main beneficiary of many Union R&D programmes to being a strong competitor; invites the Council to take into account the fact that every gap of EUR 10 billion in Horizon Europe will result in a GDP loss of EUR 110 billion over the next 25 years; concludes that low budgetary ambitions for R&D would contradict any pledge favourable to competitiveness or fighting climate change, particularly regarding the efforts that still lie ahead to meet the Europe 2020 target of 3 % GDP;

17. Underlines that transport infrastructure investment can meet both objectives of supporting EU’s economy in the current context and efforts to fight climate change, as well as the to shift to sustainable mobility, relying in particular on the completion of the Trans-European Transport Network (TEN-T), the Shift2Rail and the Connecting Europe Facility policies;

(18. Reiterates that a competitive space industry is vital for the business landscape of Europe by providing high-quality jobs, significant R&D activities and ensuring the autonomy of a European satellite infrastructure; highlights the benefits of data generated in space as an essential tool for land and environmental monitoring;

19. Stresses that small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) make up 99 % of all companies in the Member States and contribute significantly to the creation of jobs, economic stability and, increasingly, to sustainability efforts, and that these companies are most likely to be the most affected by the economic downturn resulting from the COVID-19 outbreak; stresses that SMEs face difficulties in finding financing opportunities and recalls the role of the EU programme for the Competitiveness of Enterprises and SMEs (COSME) in this regard; recalls Parliament’s position on doubling the financial envelope of its successor’s lines within the Single Market programme for the next MFF, which is expected to allow for a success rate of high-quality proposals of at least 80 %; stresses that financial support for SMEs should also be channelled through the InvestEU SMEs window, to make products and services market ready and enable their rapid scaling up on global markets; reiterates the need to further expand opportunities to create and scale up start-ups and to put special emphasis on the digital transformation of SMEs, also supported by the Single Market Gateway as an e-government business facilitator, in compliance with ambitious consumer protection policies, as well as their ecological transition; welcomes, furthermore, in this context, the various initiatives from the European Investment Bank (EIB) group, namely the mobilisation of EUR 40 billion for impacted SMEs, the EUR 5 billion available for companies in the health sector and the EUR 25 billion guarantee fund to be financed by its shareholders;

20. Stresses that the ongoing crisis will affect many regions and sectors considerably; in this context, is convinced that cohesion policy will play a key role and be more than ever before essential to stimulate the economic recovery in all EU territories, strengthen the economic, social and territorial cohesion of the Union and will require additional funding and more flexibility to respond to the complex environmental, social, economic and demographic challenges ahead; underlines that, if the adoption of the 2021-2027 MFF and the relevant legal basis are delayed, a transitional period between the two programming periods will be indispensable;

21. In the light of the immediate and long-term major negative social impacts of the current situation, underlines the importance of fully implementing the European Pillar of Social Rights in the 2021 EU budget and the crucial role of strengthened EU social actions, notably the European Social Fund+, in the economic recovery, and, in particular, to tackle unemployment among young people and the elderly, child poverty, the risk of poverty and social exclusion, discrimination, to ensure a reinforced social dialogue, addressing long-term structural demographic change and guarantee access for all, and especially for ageing populations, to vital and key services such as healthcare, mobility, adequate nutrition and decent housing;

(22. Calls for the 2021 budget to pay particular attention to the needs of and relations with the Overseas Countries and Territories (OCTs), as they can be particularly vulnerable to the adverse impact of climate change; stresses, furthermore, that access to funding for the OCTs must be improved as they possess limited administrative resources and expertise owing to their special status and size;

23. Stresses that internal security is an integral part of EU citizens’ expectations of a Union that protects; underlines that security threats such as terrorist attacks, cross-border organised crime, and new types of criminal activity such as cybercrime, pose an ongoing threat to the cohesion of the European Union and require a strong, coordinated European response; believes that this requires intensified cross-border cooperation between competent authorities; stresses that strengthening and modernising IT systems with a focus on better interoperability of systems, facilitated access and readability of data are mandatory to ensuring effective and rapid cooperation between police, judicial and other competent authorities; takes note that the Commission is expected to launch a new Security Union Strategy in 2021, which will comprise a set of initiatives in key areas related to these threats;

(24. Calls on the Commission to allocate the necessary budget in order to ensure that the EU civil protection mechanism has a greater capacity, so that the EU will be better prepared and able to respond to all types of natural disasters, pandemics and emergencies, such as chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear emergencies; reiterates the importance of the EU civil protection mechanism to better protect citizens from disasters;

25. Stresses the success of the Erasmus+ Programme in enhancing youth mobility, training and skills; highlights the need to adequately fund the programme, inter alia, to make it accessible to people from all backgrounds and age groups;

26. Recalls that the promotion of European values and cultures plays an active role in supporting democracy, non-discrimination and gender equality, and tackling disinformation and fake news; stresses, in this respect, the need to provide sufficient funding for Justice, Rights and Values programmes and to reinforce the resources dedicated to supporting victims of gender-based violence within this programme; underlines that the cultural and creative sectors, as well as tourism, are and will be among the main sectors that are victims of the crisis the EU is experiencing; calls for emergency measures for those sectors and a strengthening of the Creative Europe programme;

(27. Expects a strong EU mechanism on democracy, the rule of law and fundamental rights to be in place by 2021;

28. Considers that the European Solidarity Corps is a fundamental tool for promoting civic engagement across the Union and strengthening Union citizenship; insists that the 2021 budget for the European Solidarity Corps be commensurate with the many expectations it has raised among young people across Europe, particularly in the volunteering strand; calls for sufficient funding to be allocated to cover the high demand for volunteering placements;

29. Calls for sufficient funding to be provided as a priority to support the activity of civil society organisations and other stakeholders active in promoting rights and strengthening and promoting Union values and the rule of law, including through the future Citizens, Equality, Rights and Values programme, in times when a shrinking space for civil society is being witnessed in several Member States;

30. Stresses the worrying and increasing backlash against gender equality and women’s rights and the importance of EU instruments, including the Neighbourhood, Development and International Cooperation Instrument (NDICI), to combat this situation; regrets that the Commission did not include a specific programme on gender equality in its proposal, and calls for ambitious and specific budget allocations to support women human rights defenders and the protection and promotion of sexual and reproductive health and rights; stresses, therefore, the need to reinforce budgetary allocations that support universal respect for and access to sexual and reproductive health and rights;

31. Points out that the common agricultural policy (CAP) and the common fisheries policy (CFP) are cornerstones of European integration, which aim to ensure a safe, high-quality food supply and food sovereignty for Europeans, the proper functioning of food markets, the sustainable development of rural regions, generational renewal and the sustainable management of natural resources and the preservation of biodiversity; recalls the key role of these policies in contributing to stable and acceptable earnings for farmers and fisherwomen and fishermen, especially in the current difficult context; recalls its position for the 2021-2027 MFF negotiations to preserve the budgets for the CAP and CFP; asks for the reinforcement of these policies and for particular attention to be paid to small-scale agriculture and small fisheries; takes note that the CAP, together with other Union policies, will have an important role to play in fulfilling the Green Deal ambitions;

32. Calls on the Commission to take into account in its proposal and subsequent amending act for the draft 2021 budget, the outcome of the political agreement to be reached on the transitional measures for the year 2021 (set out in the Commission’s proposal of 31 October 2019 (COM(2019)0581)); further calls on Member States to ensure the timely allocation of sufficient resources for the continued improvement of the quality of data and indicators reported to the Union in order to fully comply with the ‘EU Budget Focused on Results’ (BFOR) initiative; insists on the high quality of data and indicators to properly assess the CAP;

33. Takes note of the most recent developments with regard to the migration situation at the EU’s external border with Turkey, leading to the recent adoption of an amending budget 1/2020 in order to respond to the increased migration pressure; underlines that an adequate level of resources needs to be secured in the 2021 budget in anticipation of a possible continuation or even deterioration of this situation; recalls the need for solidarity and cooperation among all Member States in this field and for a common asylum policy; stresses the additional needs resulting from the COVID-19 outbreak to adopt specific measures for migrants as particularly vulnerable people, including preventive evacuation and relocation; recalls the regular need to reinforce the Asylum and Migration Fund over the last period to help Member States to cope with the refugee crisis, and to mobilise the special instruments for that purpose because the ceiling under heading 3 was too low, or through amending budgets; expects Member States to understand their own interests and to compensate for the effect of the delay in the adoption of the Dublin IV regulation by supporting the necessary appropriations and implementing the solidarity principle in this field; recalls the need for adequate funding to improve migrants’ and refugees’ living conditions in EU refugee camps, for law enforcement, training for border personnel and coastguards, and for effective measures for the integration of migrants and refugees;

34. Points out that well-managed legal migration is important to ensure an adequate response to the evolving labour market;

35. Notes that Turkey continues to host the largest refugee population in the world and that discussions are currently ongoing as to how the EU should continue its support to Turkey after the end of its commitments made under the EU Facility for Refugees in Turkey;

36. Stresses that immediate solidarity measures, in particular a relocation programme, should be introduced pending meaningful reform of the EU’s asylum rules; requests, furthermore, that funding remain envisaged in the EU budget for the support of refugees in Turkey;

37. Calls for an ambitious 2021 budget in EU’s external policies that would enable the Union to rise to the challenges it faces; recalls that peace and solidarity constitute core values that should be consistently supported by the EU budget; emphasises the need to increase the funding for the countries of the Western Balkans and for the Eastern and Southern Neighbourhood in order to support political and economic reforms, as well as for other regions in need of financial support for their development;

38. Believes that the Instrument for Pre-Accession Assistance (IPA III) should focus its funding on the areas of the functioning of democratic institutions, the rule of law, good governance and public administration; recalls that the Commission has recommended opening accession negotiations with Albania and North Macedonia, and calls for adequate financial provisions in order to support political reforms and alignment with the acquis;

39. Underlines that financial allocations under the IPA III should be conditional on respect for European values such as the rule of law, the independence of the judiciary, the democratic process, respect for fundamental values and good neighbourly relations; calls on the Commission to monitor the implementation of conditionality; asks the Commission to use the funds currently allocated under IPA III to support, through direct management by the EU, Turkey’s civil society, human rights defenders and journalists, and to increase opportunities for people-to-people contacts, academic dialogue, access for Turkish students to European universities, and media platforms for journalists with the objective of protecting and promoting democratic values and principles, human rights and the rule of law;

40. Stresses that Parliament’s first reading position on the NDICI was adopted on 4 March 2019, and its mandate regarding the NDICI was reconfirmed on 8 October 2019; recalls its position in favour of a contribution of 45 % of the overall financial envelope of the NDICI to climate objectives, environmental management and protection, biodiversity and combating desertification, and addressing the root causes of migration and forced displacement, and puts a strong focus on the promotion of democracy, the rule of law and human rights, including the rights of women, children, refugees, displaced people, LGTBI persons, persons with disabilities and indigenous peoples and ethnic and religious minorities;

41. Recalls that the long-lasting solution to the current migration phenomenon lies in the political, economic and social development of the countries from which migration flows originate; calls for the respective external policy programmes to be endowed with sufficient financial resources to support fair and mutually beneficial partnerships between the EU and countries of origin and countries of transit, including those on the African continent; in the same context, in view of the difficult financial situation faced by the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA), calls on the EU to step up its financial support to the Agency in 2021, in order to preserve the uninterrupted provision of vital services to millions of Palestinian refugees;

42. Is concerned at the rapid worldwide spread of the COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on the affected countries; is convinced that international cooperation is crucial to overcoming this global crisis; believes that the EU should take the lead in the global efforts to contain the pandemic and mitigate its impact; believes that the Union must show solidarity with affected third countries, including by mobilising additional resources, to help them rebuild their economies, mitigate the socio-economic impact of the crisis and strengthen the capacities of public health systems worldwide;

43. Recalls that human rights are an integral part of the EU’s external action policy; reiterates the need for increased funding dedicated to supporting human rights worldwide, with a particular focus on the protection of human rights defenders, in particular those most at risk; stresses, in this regard, the need to continue the Human Rights Defenders Mechanism (Protectdefenders.eu) and to increase the funding dedicated to it; believes that the EU should strictly refrain from budget support as a means of providing assistance in countries which grossly fail to meet international standards in the field of human rights and democracy, or which fail to demonstrate their commitment to fighting corruption; highlights the importance of election observation missions, particularly by local civil society groups, and calls for an appropriate level of funding;

44. Calls for further funding for strategic communication actions to counter disinformation campaigns, which are increasingly being used to undermine democratic order in the Union and in countries in the Union’s near neighbourhood; highlights the importance of the flagship project of the European External Action Service’s ‘East StratCom Task Force – EUvsDisinfo’ in the fight against disinformation, propaganda and foreign influence;

45. Emphasises the importance of providing adequate financial support to frame a genuine European Defence Union, promote strategic autonomy and bolster the EU’s role at global level; stresses in particular the importance of maintaining its position regarding the amounts for the European Defence Fund (EDF) and for military mobility; stresses that continued support to and enhanced coordination of defence-related policy and actions under the European Defence Agency (EDA), Permanent Structured Cooperation (PESCO), the EDF and other initiatives should be ensured; urges the Commission to provide for the funding of the administrative and operating expenditure of the EDA and PESCO from the Union budget, thereby restoring Parliament’s budgetary function as provided for by Article 41 of the TEU;

46. Reiterates that the new External Financing Instruments (EFI) architecture should enhance coherence, accountability, efficiency and democratic oversight; emphasises the need for a greater role for Parliament in the strategic steering of the new instruments; expects to be involved from an early stage in the (pre-)programming of the new instruments;

(47. Urges the Commission to assess and prepare for all possible scenarios to ensure the sound financial management of the Union budget, defining clear commitments and outlining mechanisms and protecting the EU budget; calls on the Commission to ensure that the future participation of UK in EU programmes respects a fair balance as regards the contributions and benefits;

(48. Expresses its intention for the United Kingdom to remain as close a partner in as many EU programmes as possible, in particular Erasmus+ and Horizon Europe;

49. Recalls the pivotal role played by EU agencies in the implementation of EU policy objectives and reaffirms the importance of endowing these bodies with sufficient and predictable funding and staff for the efficient running of their duties, while rejecting any unjustified and arbitrary cuts to their budgets in real terms; highlights the key role performed by the European Environment Agency in developing awareness with regard to climate change, the European Labour Authority in promoting labour mobility, as well as the European Asylum Support Office and the Fundamental Rights Agency in supporting asylum seekers looking for protection in Europe;

50. At the same time, stresses the strong need to combat human trafficking and smuggling, as well as to support EU Justice and Home Affairs agencies, which provide assistance to Member States on external borders, such as the European Border and Coast Guard Agency (Frontex); takes note of the role that Frontex is called on to play in the context of the current migration crisis taking place at the EU’s external borders with Turkey; calls for appropriate funding levels for border management in the 2021 budget;

51. Notes that agencies operating in the area of security, law enforcement and criminal justice cooperation are being assigned an increasing number of tasks; requests increased financial resources and staff posts for these agencies, in particular for the European Union Agency for Criminal Justice Cooperation (Eurojust), the European Police Office (Europol), the European Police College (CEPOL), the European Union Agency for Cybersecurity (ENISA) and the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA), as well as adequate funding and staff for those that will be working on money laundering and terrorism financing;

52. Is concerned about the insufficient level of funding and staff provided to the European Public Prosecutor’s Office (EPPO) in the course of the 2020 budgetary procedure and, with a view to 2021, calls on the Commission to increase staff and resources for this institutional body and to protect its budgetary autonomy; underlines that the establishment of the EPPO must not result in the a deterioration of the capacity of the European Anti-Fraud Office (OLAF) to function properly;

53. As a result of the recent COVID-19 outbreak in Europe and of the need for a prompt, coordinated and coherent EU response, urgently calls on the Commission to provide adequate and necessary funding to the relevant EU agencies which need to work and support the Commission and the Member States in the effort to tackle this pandemic, in particular the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) and the European Medicines Agency (EMA); insists that the Commission and the Council refrain from cutting the resources of the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) and the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA);

54. Underlines the need to substantially reinforce the European Agency for the Cooperation of Energy Regulators (ACER), taking into account the additional tasks conferred on it through recent legislation, including the Clean Energy Package; recalls, furthermore, the need for additional resources for the Agency for Support for BEREC (BEREC Office) to carry out its tasks enshrined in the BEREC Regulation and the European Electronic Communications Code;

55. Recalls that no Union policy, whether to cope with the COVID-19 crisis or to implement the European Green Deal, can be properly implemented without the support of a dedicated Union civil service and sufficient funding;

56. Believes, in the ongoing political and economic context, that the Conference on the Future of Europe should be adequately supported, also on the budgetary side, and that the Commission, among other institutions involved in this project, should be equipped with the necessary means to make a success of it;

57. Asks the Commission to lead by example in ensuring high-quality and socially responsible procurement, so that contracts are awarded to companies respecting environmental and core labour standards;

58. Calls for a gender-responsive evaluation of the previous budgetary period and the implementation of gender budgeting in the 2021 EU budget; expects, therefore, the Commission to include in its draft budget an annex that draws together gender-specific information on objectives, inputs, outputs and results, and that presents financing commitments for gender equality and the related tracking measures;

A sufficient and realistic level of payments

59. Is determined to avoid a new payment crisis, especially in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic; reiterates that the overall payment ceiling must also take into account the unprecedented volume of outstanding commitments at the end of 2020 to be settled under the next MFF; further notes that the focus of payment appropriations in 2021 will largely be on completion of 2014-2020 programmes; insists, however, that this should not hinder the launch of new programmes;

60. Insists, therefore, in line with the 2020 measures, on the need to keep ensuring a high level of liquidity to Member States as part of the response to COVID-19 pandemic;

(61. Underlines that cooperation between Member States in the field of taxation incomes would bring back to their national budgets much more than would any cut to expenditure in the EU annual budgets;

(62. Calls on the Commission to ensure that no EU funding is granted to any parties subject to EU restrictive measures (including contractors or subcontractors, participants in workshops and/or training courses, and recipients of financial support to third parties);

(63. Is convinced that any legal person who is a beneficial owner of legal entities receiving funds from the EU budget must be prohibited from receiving any funds from the existing, as well as the future European budget under the rules of the Regulation on the Multiannual Financial Framework for 2021-2017, including direct agricultural payments and any disbursements, expenditures, guarantees or other benefits dealt with therein if they are in a clear conflict of interests as defined in Article 61 of the Financial Regulation (EU, Euratom) 2018/1046;

(64. Reiterates its long-standing view that new political priorities and upcoming challenges for the EU should be financed by fresh appropriations and not by reducing the appropriations of existing programmes; considers that this principle should also apply to amending budgets;

(65. Notes that, as the first year of the potentially agreed next MFF, the 2021 budget will be the first reflecting a new budgetary nomenclature; calls on the Commission to involve the budgetary authority appropriately in its preparation; believes that the new nomenclature, while being better aligned with the policy priorities, must be sufficiently detailed to allow the budgetary authority to fulfil its decision-making role effectively, and for Parliament in particular to fulfil its democratic oversight and scrutiny roles;

66. Notes that, as the arm of the budgetary authority directly elected by the citizens, Parliament will fulfil its political role and put forward proposals for pilot projects and preparatory actions expressing its political vision for the future; commits itself, in this context, to proposing a package of pilot projects and preparatory actions developed in close cooperation with each of its committees so as to strike the right balance between political will and technical feasibility, as assessed by the Commission;

°

° °

67. Instructs its President to forward this resolution to the Council, the Commission and the Court of Auditors.


 

 

 

 

OPINION OF THE COMMITTEE ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS (21.4.2020)

<CommissionInt>for the Committee on Budgets</CommissionInt>


<Titre>on Guidelines for the 2021 budget – Section III</Titre>

<DocRef>(2019/2213(BUD))</DocRef>

Rapporteur for opinion: <Depute>Nikos Androulakis</Depute>

 

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on Foreign Affairs calls on the Committee on Budgets, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions into its motion for a resolution:

1. Calls for an ambitious 2021 budget that will enable the EU to rise to the external policy challenges, fulfil its objectives and strive towards the goal of achieving strategic autonomy;

2. Is concerned by the rapid worldwide spread of the COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on the affected countries; is convinced that international cooperation is crucial to overcome this global crisis; believes that the EU should take the lead in the global efforts to contain the pandemic and mitigate its impact; calls on the EU to show solidarity with the affected third countries, particularly those in its immediate neighbourhood, including by mobilising additional resources via the EU’s external financing instruments to help affected countries rebuild their economies, mitigate the socio-economic impact of this crisis and strengthen the capacities of public health systems worldwide;

3. Underlines the strategic importance of enlargement policy in the Western Balkans and of the EU neighbourhood policy; emphasises the need to increase the funding for the Western Balkan countries and the countries of the Eastern and Southern Neighbourhood in order to support political and economic reforms, with a focus on the most committed partners following the principle of ‘more for more and less for less’; recalls the need to implement strict conditionality in regard to financial support; stresses the need to particularly support pro-European and pro-democratic forces in these regions, thereby fostering the development of EU values and respect for the rule of law;

4. Believes that the Instrument for Pre-Accession Assistance (IPA III) should focus its funding on the areas of functioning of democratic institutions, the rule of law, good governance and public administration; recalls that the Commission has recommended opening accession negotiations with Albania and North Macedonia, and calls for adequate financial provisions in order to support political reforms and alignment with the acquis;

5. Underlines that financial allocations under the IPA III should be conditional on respect for European values such as the rule of law, independence of the judiciary, democratic process, respect for fundamental values and good neighbourly relations; calls on the Commission to monitor the implementation of conditionality; asks the Commission to use the funds currently allocated under the Instrument for Pre-Accession Assistance (IPA III) to support, via direct management by the EU, Turkey’s civil society, human rights defenders and journalists and to increase opportunities for people-to-people contacts, academic dialogue, access for Turkish students to European universities, and media platforms for journalists with the objective of protecting and promoting democratic values and principles, human rights and the rule of law;

6. Recalls the worrying developments in the countries in the Southern Neighbourhood, including the continuing conflicts in Syria and Libya, the rise of extremism, and refugee and migrant waves; calls on the Commission to dedicate adequate financial resources for the countries in the Southern Neighbourhood under the new EFIs structure;

7. Calls on the Commission, in view of the increasing uncertainty and instability in the region, to step up its financial support for the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA) in 2021, in order to preserve uninterrupted basic services for millions of Palestinian refugees and allow the Agency to carry out its critically important mandate; deplores the continued destruction and confiscation of EU-funded humanitarian assistance in the West Bank; is concerned by the lack of resolve of the EEAS and the Commission, as highlighted by the European Court of Auditors, to secure compensation from the Israeli authorities, as requested by Parliament in its resolution of September 2018;

8. Reiterates its call for a profound and comprehensive review of the EU’s relations with Egypt, notably its assistance programme; considers, as stressed in its resolution of October 2019, that the human rights situation in Egypt requires a serious revision of the Commission’s budget support operations and calls for EU assistance to be restricted to primarily supporting civil society;

9. Recalls that various European political leaders have highlighted the importance of significantly advancing relations with the African continent, and hence stresses the need to adequately match words with deeds and provide adequate funding in order to address the many joint short-term, medium-term and long-term challenges and opportunities which Europe and Africa can only tackle together;

10. Requests that the Commission come up with a comprehensive EU Arctic Strategy that takes into account all the geopolitical and geostrategic aspects as well as the rapid climate change in the region; asks the Commission to include the Arctic in the 2020 Work Programme;

11. Welcomes the proposal made by the Commission President, Ursula von der Leyen, to create a ‘Geopolitical Commission’; reiterates, however, the need to ensure the fulfilment of other EU priorities and values, such as the protection of human rights, gender equality, the protection of the environment and minority rights; highlights, therefore, the need to protect the above-mentioned while building a new ‘geopolitical’ EU;

12. Recalls that human rights are an integral part of the EU’s external action policy; reiterates the need for increased funding dedicated to supporting human rights worldwide, with a particular focus on the protection of human rights defenders, in particular those most at risk; stresses in this regard the need to continue the Human Rights Defenders Mechanism (Protectdefenders.eu) and to increase the funding dedicated to it; believes that the EU should strictly refrain from budget support as a modality to provide assistance in countries which grossly fail to meet international standards in the field of human rights and democracy or which fail to demonstrate their commitment to fighting corruption; highlights the importance of election observation missions, notably by local civil society groups, and calls for an appropriate level of funding;

13. Calls for further funding for strategic communication actions to counter disinformation campaigns, which are increasingly used to undermine the democratic order in the Union and in countries in the Union’s near neighbourhood; highlights the importance of the flagship project of the European External Action Service’s ‘East StratCom Task Force - EU vs. Disinfo’ in the fight against disinformation, propaganda and foreign influence;

14. Underlines that climate change is changing the geopolitical landscape as well as increasing humanitarian needs in many parts of the world; insists that the next budget should help the Union meet its obligations under the Paris Agreement, should be fully aligned with the objective of limiting global warming to under 1.5°C, and should contribute to halting and reversing the decline in biodiversity; underlines in this regard also the importance of effective climate and environmental (including biodiversity) proofing of the budget; stresses that every effort should be made to ensure that the overall climate mainstreaming target is reached over the whole period 2021-2027;

15. Stresses the importance of gender mainstreaming and the need for proper indicators and a specific methodology, as well as regular monitoring, in order to analyse the impact of the EU budget on gender equality; calls on the EEAS to improve the gender and geographical balance among its staff; stresses the need for specific measures to ensure the presence of gender advisers in EU delegations and CSDP missions and operations;

16. Insists that the budget for the Common Foreign and Security Policy should focus on priority areas, both geographically and thematically, and on areas where EU action can bring most added value;

17. Emphasises the importance of providing adequate financial support to frame a genuine European Defence Union, promote strategic autonomy and bolster the EU’s role on the global level; stresses in particular the importance of maintaining Parliament’s position regarding the amounts for the European Defence Fund (EDF) and for military mobility; stresses that continued support to and enhanced coordination of defence-related policy and actions under EDA, PESCO, EDF and other initiatives should be ensured; urges the Commission to provide for the funding of the administrative and operating expenditure of the European Defence Agency and Permanent Structured Cooperation from the Union budget, thereby restoring Parliament’s budgetary function as provided for by Article 41 TEU;

18. Stresses the importance of maintaining Parliament’s position regarding the allocation for the European Space Programme, which strengthens Europe’s role as a global player and is a strong asset for its security and defence;

19. Notes that a new generation of external financing instruments (EFIs) will come into force in 2021, including a streamlined global instrument replacing most of the existing EFIs;

20. Reiterates that the new EFI architecture should enhance coherence, accountability, efficiency and democratic oversight; emphasises the need for a greater role for Parliament in the strategic steering of the new instruments; expects to be involved from an early stage in the (pre-)programming of the new instruments;

21. Calls for increased transparency and scrutiny of EFI funding in recipient countries, so as to ensure that financial resources are used to the most efficient and effective degree possible; demands regular exchanges through a structured dialogue between Parliament and the Commission that would allow Parliament to evaluate in detail the use of the budget; calls for increased cooperation and consultation with local beneficiaries throughout the budgetary planning and implementation phases; stresses the need to promote the visibility of EFIs by raising awareness of their positive impact and benefits in order to strengthen the impact of funding and enhance EU public diplomacy;

22. Requests that the Commission prepare contingency plans in due time in order to ensure continuity of funding in the event that the new programmes are not adopted in time for the start of the new multiannual financial framework (MFF);

23. Urges the Commission to present a differentiated budget nomenclature for the new external financing instruments, notably by including at least one budget line for each third country receiving significant amounts of EU assistance; stresses that in the context of a more streamlined set of instruments, the budget structure needs to be sufficiently detailed and transparent to allow Parliament to carry out its budgetary functions effectively and fulfil its oversight role.


INFORMATION ON ADOPTION IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

Date adopted

20.4.2020

 

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

51

14

5

Members present for the final vote

Alviina Alametsä, Alexander Alexandrov Yordanov, Maria Arena, Petras Auštrevičius, Traian Băsescu, Lars Patrick Berg, Anna Bonfrisco, Reinhard Bütikofer, Fabio Massimo Castaldo, Susanna Ceccardi, Włodzimierz Cimoszewicz, Katalin Cseh, Tanja Fajon, Anna Fotyga, Michael Gahler, Kinga Gál, Giorgos Georgiou, Sunčana Glavak, Raphaël Glucksmann, Klemen Grošelj, Bernard Guetta, Márton Gyöngyösi, Sandra Kalniete, Karol Karski, Dietmar Köster, Stelios Kouloglou, Andrius Kubilius, Ilhan Kyuchyuk, David Lega, Miriam Lexmann, Nathalie Loiseau, Antonio López-Istúriz White, Lukas Mandl, Thierry Mariani, David McAllister, Vangelis Meimarakis, Sven Mikser, Francisco José Millán Mon, Javier Nart, Gheorghe-Vlad Nistor, Urmas Paet, Demetris Papadakis, Kostas Papadakis, Tonino Picula, Manu Pineda, Kati Piri, Giuliano Pisapia, Diana Riba i Giner, Jérôme Rivière, María Soraya Rodríguez Ramos, Nacho Sánchez Amor, Isabel Santos, Jacek Saryusz-Wolski, Andreas Schieder, Radosław Sikorski, Sergei Stanishev, Tineke Strik, Hermann Tertsch, Hilde Vautmans, Harald Vilimsky, Idoia Villanueva Ruiz, Viola Von Cramon-Taubadel, Thomas Waitz, Witold Jan Waszczykowski, Charlie Weimers, Isabel Wiseler-Lima, Salima Yenbou, Željana Zovko

Substitutes present for the final vote

Nikos Androulakis, Nicolas Bay


 

 

FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

51

+

NI

Fabio Massimo Castaldo, Márton Gyöngyösi

PPE

Alexander Alexandrov Yordanov, Traian Băsescu, Michael Gahler, Kinga Gál, Sunčana Glavak, Sandra Kalniete, Andrius Kubilius, David Lega, Miriam Lexmann, David McAllister, Lukas Mandl, Vangelis Meimarakis, Francisco José Millán Mon, Gheorge-Vlad Nistor, Radosław Sikorski, Isabel Wiseler-Lima, Željana Zovko

Renew

Petras Auštrevičius, Katalin Cseh, Klemen Grošelj, Bernatd Guetta, Ihan Kyuchyuk, Nathalie Loiseau, Javier Nart, Urmas Paet, María Soraya Rodríguez Ramos, Hilde Vautmans

S&D

Nikos Androulakis, Maria Arena, Włodzimierz Cimoszewicz, Tanja Fajon, Raphaël Glucksmann, Dietmar Köster, Sven Mikser, Demetris Papadakis, Tonino Picula, Kati Piri, Giuliano Pisapia, Nacho Sánchez Amor, Isabel Santos, Andreas Schieder, Sergei Stanishev

Verts/ALE

Alviina Alametsä, Reinhard Bütikofer, Diana Riba I Giner, Tineke Strik, Viola Von Cramon-Taubadel, Thomas Waitz, Salima Yenbou

 

14

-

ECR

Anna Fotyga, Katol Karksi, Jacek Saryusz-Wolski, Hermann Tertsch, Jan Witold Waszczykowski, Charlie Weimers

ID

Lars Patrick Berg, Anna Bonfrisco, Susanna Ceccardi, Thierry Mariani, Jérôme Rivière, Harald Vilimsky, Nicolas Bay

NI

Kostas Papadakis

 

5

0

GUE/NGL

Giorgos Georgiou, Stelios Kouloglou, Manu Pineda, Idoia Villanueva Ruiz

PPE

Antonio López‑Istúriz White

 

Key to symbols:

+ : in favour

- : against

0 : abstention

 


 

DRAFT POSITION IN THE FORM OF AMENDMENTS OF THE COMMITTEE ON EMPLOYMENT AND SOCIAL AFFAIRS

<CommissionInt>for the Committee on Budgets</CommissionInt>


<Titre>on general guidelines for the preparation of the 2021 budget, Section III – Commission</Titre>

<DocRef>(2019/2213(BUD))</DocRef>

On behalf of the Committee on Employment and Social Affairs: <Depute>Lucia Ďuriš Nicholsonová</Depute> (Chair)

 


PA_NonLegPosition


AMENDMENTS

The Committee on Employment and Social Affairs presents the following amendments to the Committee on Budgets, as the committee responsible:

<RepeatBlock-Amend><Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>1</NumAm>

<DocAmend>Motion for a resolution</DocAmend>

<Article>Citation 13a (new)</Article>

 

Motion for a resolution

Amendment

 

 having regard to the European Pillar of Social Rights,

</Amend>

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>2</NumAm>

<DocAmend>Motion for a resolution</DocAmend>

<Article>Recital Ga (new)</Article>

 

Motion for a resolution

Amendment

 

Ga. whereas some of the Commission’s key objectives include helping to fight child poverty, supporting young people by giving them the education and opportunities they need to thrive, and getting more women into the labour market;

</Amend>

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>3</NumAm>

<DocAmend>Motion for a resolution</DocAmend>

<Article>Paragraph 3 a (new) and 3 b (new)</Article>

 

Motion for a resolution

Amendment

 

3a. Recalls that the future EU budget should contribute to climate and biodiversity mainstreaming beyond the anticipated levels of targeted spending, which should be achieved by integrating climate and environmental objectives into decision-making in all policies and programmes throughout the entire policy cycle, while pursuing the objective of a just transition that leaves no one behind;

 

3b. Welcomes, moreover, the job creation that the European Green Deal could herald and is determined to ensure decent working conditions for all; is convinced, therefore, that the European Green Deal must be accompanied by interventions targeting the protection of workers in particular;

</Amend>

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>4</NumAm>

<DocAmend>Motion for a resolution</DocAmend>

<Article>Paragraph 3 c (new)</Article>

 

Motion for a resolution

Amendment

 

3c. Emphasises that the transition funds should not only cover the relocation of coal and other fossil fuel workers, but must also take into consideration all sectors potentially involved, including steel;

</Amend>

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>5</NumAm>

<DocAmend>Motion for a resolution</DocAmend>

<Article>Paragraph 4</Article>

 

Motion for a resolution

Amendment

4.  Is concerned about the risk of a new financial crisis, as highlighted by international financial institutions, in the light of rising global public and private debt (322 % of the world’s GDP); is worried about the potential social and political consequences of such a crisis – projected by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) to be ten times harsher than in the aftermath of 2008 – if the EU is not equipped with new tools to protect social cohesion;

4.  Is concerned about the risk of a new financial crisis, as highlighted by international financial institutions, in the light of rising global public and private debt (322 % of the world’s GDP); is worried about the potential social and political consequences of such a crisis – projected by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) to be ten times harsher than in the aftermath of 2008 – if the EU is not equipped with new tools to protect social cohesion, preserve jobs and prevent mass layoffs;

</Amend>

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>6</NumAm>

<DocAmend>Motion for a resolution</DocAmend>

<Article>Title of the section, Paragraphs 4 a, 4 b, 4 c, 4 d, 4 e, 4 f, 4 g, 4 h (new)</Article>

 

Motion for a resolution

Amendment

...and protect EU citizens from the next financial crisis

...and guarantee and achieve full social, economic and territorial cohesion

 

4a. Recalls that sustainable and inclusive growth, well-targeted investment and fiscal policy are the key to the creation of quality employment and greater prosperity for all;

 

4b. Emphasises, therefore, that the Green Deal must usher in social progress, by improving the well-being of all and reducing social inequalities, economic imbalances between Member States, and disparities between gender and generations; believes that a just transition should leave no person and no place behind and should address social and economic inequalities; reiterates that the transition to a climate-neutral economy and a sustainable society must be carried out in conjunction with the implementation of the European Pillar of Social Rights;

 

4c. Advocates, therefore, an ambitious 2021 budget in order to further the implementation of the European Pillar of Social Rights on the basis of sustainable growth of a highly competitive social market economy, with the aim of achieving full employment and social progress, promoting equality for all and solidarity between generations, and safeguarding the rights of the child, as enshrined in the Treaty on the European Union; highlights, in particular, the importance of adequate funding to support measures for the promotion of equality and equal access to the labour market for men and women; also recalls the importance of adequate funding and other instruments that promote the support of anti-discrimination legislation and policies and the implementation thereof;

 

4d. Highlights that implementing the above requires properly funded social policies and underlines the need, therefore, to reinforce the existing instruments contributing to these goals, notably the European Social Fund + (ESF+) (including the Youth Employment Initiative (YEI)), the Fund for European Aid to the Most Deprived (FEAD), the EU Programme for Employment and Social Innovation (EaSI) and the European Globalisation Adjustment Fund (EGF);

 

4e. Recalls the need to direct the structural funds and investments more effectively towards promoting inclusive growth, reducing inequalities and boosting upward social convergence;

 

4f. Warns that any reductions in the budget for these areas could make it difficult for these policies to be effective and to attain their targets; insists, therefore, that they be safeguarded in the next MFF and that they continue to be implemented predominantly through grants;

 

4g. Reiterates that these funds should create synergies to help reduce social divergences and inequalities to make sure that no one is left behind in the process;

 

4h. Highlights the need, moreover, to ensure a smooth transition between the current funding period and the new MFF, especially between the current ESF, YEI, FEAD and EaSI, towards the new ESF+;

</Amend>

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>7</NumAm>

<DocAmend>Motion for a resolution</DocAmend>

<Article>Paragraph 4 i (new)</Article>

 

Motion for a resolution

Amendment

 

4i.  Calls for sufficient funding to support investment in housing in order to tackle effectively the growing problems of a lack of affordable housing, poor housing conditions, housing exclusion and homelessness;

</Amend>

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>8</NumAm>

<DocAmend>Motion for a resolution</DocAmend>

<Article>Paragraph 4 j (new)</Article>

 

Motion for a resolution

Amendment

 

4j.  Recalls the importance of ensuring that no one is left behind; advocates, therefore, an EU budget that promotes equality at all life stages – from the beginning to the end of people’s lives; to this end, calls for the creation of a programme to support Member States that wish to establish or strengthen a public and universal network of childcare and elderly care, as well as a public network for those much reliant on care such as persons with disabilities or those with long-term care needs;

</Amend>

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>9</NumAm>

<DocAmend>Motion for a resolution</DocAmend>

<Article>Paragraphs 4 k, 4 l, 4 m, 4 n, 4 o (new)</Article>

 

Motion for a resolution

Amendment

 

4k. Recalls that youth unemployment remains unacceptably high and characterised by significant disparities across the Member States;

 

4l. Reiterates the importance, therefore, of adequate funding and other instruments that promote measures tackling youth unemployment and making young people more employable, namely the YEI and Erasmus+;

 

4m. Takes note, moreover, of the Commission’s proposal to integrate the YEI into the ESF+ for the 2021-2027 programming period, but expresses concern about the lack of clarity over the actual year-to-year resources dedicated to combating youth unemployment within the future ESF+, particularly with regard to the thematic concentrations in the ESF+ Regulation; stresses the need to keep the level of funding to fight youth unemployment at least at the level of the previous programming period;

 

4n. Welcomes the commitment undertaken by Commission President Ursula von der Leyen in her Political Guidelines to strengthen the Youth Guarantee by turning it into a permanent instrument with an increased budget and regular reporting;

 

4o. Calls for funding to be ensured in 2021 for a continued implementation of the Youth Guarantee in the Member States;

</Amend>

 

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>10</NumAm>

<DocAmend>Motion for a resolution</DocAmend>

<Article>Paragraphs 10 a, 10 b, 10 c, 10 e (new)</Article>

 

Motion for a resolution

Amendment

 

10a. Deplores the fact that more than a quarter of all children in the EU are at risk of poverty or social exclusion;

 

10b. Welcomes, in this regard, the Commission’s commitment to creating the European Child Guarantee in order to help ensure that every child in Europe at risk of poverty or social exclusion has access to the most basic set of rights such as healthcare, childcare, education, adequate nutrition and decent housing;

 

10c. Strongly recalls that this initiative is also linked to the MFF negotiations and calls for the European Child Guarantee to be integrated into the future ESF+, with at least EUR 5.9 billion of fresh funding for the entire 2021-2027 MFF period;

 

10d. Recalls the role of EU instruments in supporting companies and workers in their transition to a digital and greener economy; reiterates the importance of vocational education and training (VET) in the age of digitalisation; calls on the Commission to explore further opportunities to support VET programmes, especially in the areas of software development and information technologies;

 

10e. Calls for the 2021 budget to pay particular attention to the needs of and relations with the Overseas Countries and Territories (OCTs), as they can be particularly vulnerable to the adverse impact of climate change; stresses, futhermore, that access to funding for the OCTs must be improved as they possess limited administrative resources and expertise owing to their special status and size;

</Amend>

 

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>11</NumAm>

<DocAmend>Motion for a resolution</DocAmend>

<Article>Paragraph 12</Article>

 

Motion for a resolution

Amendment

12.  Is determined to avoid a new payment crisis; reiterates that the overall payment ceiling must take into account the unprecedented volume of outstanding commitments at the end of 2020 to be settled under the next MFF; further notes that the focus of payment appropriations in 2021 will largely be on completion of 2014-2020 programmes; insists, however, that this should not hinder the launch of new programmes;

12.  Is determined to avoid a new payment crisis; reiterates that the overall payment ceiling must take into account the unprecedented volume of outstanding commitments at the end of 2020 to be settled under the next MFF; further notes that the focus of payment appropriations in 2021 will largely be on completion of 2014-2020 programmes; insists, however, that this should not hinder the launch of new programmes and should not be done at the expense of the ESF+;

</Amend>

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>12</NumAm>

<DocAmend>Motion for a resolution</DocAmend>

<Article>Paragraph 14 a (new)</Article>

 

Motion for a resolution

Amendment

 

14a. Calls for particular attention to be paid to ensuring a seamless transition for funding under the current progress axis of EaSI;

</Amend>

</RepeatBlock-Amend>

 


 

 

LETTER OF THE COMMITTEE ON DEVELOPMENT

Mr Johan Van Overtveldt,

Chair,

Committee on Budgets,

BRUSSELS.

Subject: <Titre>Opinion on the Guidelines for the 2021 Budget - Section III </Titre><DocRef>(2019/2213(BUD))</DocRef>

Dear Mr Chair,

Under the procedure referred to above, the Committee on Development has been asked to submit an opinion to your committee. By written procedure, the committee decided to send the opinion in the form of a letter.

The Committee on Development considered the matter at its meeting of 21 April 2020. At that meeting, it decided to call on the Committee on Budgets, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions into its motion for a resolution.

 

Yours sincerely,

Tomas Tobé

SUGGESTIONS

 

1. Urges the Council to finalise its negotiating mandates for the new multiannual financial framework (MFF) and the Neighbourhood, Development and International Cooperation Instrument (NDICI);

2. Stresses that Parliament’s first reading position on the NDICI was adopted on 4 March 2019, and its mandate regarding the NDICI was reconfirmed on 8 October 2019; recalls Parliament’s position that 45 % of the overall NDICI budget should be allocated to climate objectives, environmental management and protection, biodiversity and combating desertification, as well as to addressing the root causes of migration and forced displacement, while integrating a strong focus on the promotion of democracy, rule of law and human rights, including the rights of women, children, refugees, displaced people, LGTBI persons, persons with disabilities, indigenous peoples, and ethnic and religious minorities;

3. Points out that improving cohesion between Member States, deepening solidarity with our partners, and implementing the 2030 Agenda will be our main objectives for the forthcoming budgetary exercise;

4. Reiterates that the Union and its Member States must honour their collective commitments, notably on the 0.7 % ODA/GNI objective, the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the Paris Agreement[[1]] as well as targets for health, education and gender equality;

5. Calls for the implementation of the principle of Policy Coherence for Development (PCD) enshrined in Article 208 TFEU, and for a clear identification of the responsibilities of individual EU bodies for the implementation of PCD commitments;

6. Recalls that the Union must be ready to fight COVID-19 globally by supporting its partner countries; stresses that EU funds must be deployed in a way that shows international solidarity with the most vulnerable in the world; believes that the EU must increase its support for the WHO and UNHCR; calls for EU support to the fragile health systems in Africa, Latin America and Asia;

7. Calls for the EU to foster cooperation and multilateral contacts to achieve coordinated international solutions to the COVID-19 crisis; believes that the EU and the Member States must appeal to multilateral financial organisations to temporarily suspend, or even consider partially cancelling, repayments of institutional debt so that debt enforcement can be brought into line with their top priority, the fight against COVID-19; considers that, when many countries in Africa, Latin America and Asia are facing serious difficulties in providing basic health care to huge numbers of people during a health crisis, the EU and the international community must alleviate all burdens that reduce partner countries’ ability to cope with the pandemic.

 


 

 

 

LETTER OF THE COMMITTEE ON BUDGETARY CONTROL

Mr Johan Van Overtveldt

Chair

Committee on Budgets

BRUSSELS

Subject: <Titre>Opinion on Guidelines for the 2021 budgetary procedure – Section III</Titre> <DocRef> 2019/2213(BUD) </DocRef>

 

Dear Mr Van Overtveldt,

 

The Committee on Budgetary Control (CONT) calls on the Committee on Budgets, as the committee responsible, to bear in mind the following concerns in its preparation of European Parliament Guidelines for the 2021 budgetary procedure

 

Outstanding commitments (RAL)

1. CONT is concerned by the facts that:

- outstanding commitments (RAL) have continued to grow in 2018, reaching EUR 281,2 billion at the end of 2018 (compared to EUR 267,3 billion in 2017) and that they have increased by 36 % (EUR 73,7 billion) over the past seven years since 2011, the corresponding year of the previous MFF;

- based on the Commission’s long-term forecast, outstanding commitments will reach EUR 313,8 billion by 2023;

2. CONT calls on the Commission to further improve its financial forecasts and to assist countries in finding eligible projects with clear European added-value;

3. CONT points out that the risk of insufficient payment appropriations is all the greater given that the implementation of the ESI Funds suffers from even greater delays than in the previous MFF; in this respect, our Committee points to the fact that in 9 out of 13 Member States who joined the Union since 2004, the outstanding commitments present more than 15 % of their annual government expenditures; lack of payment appropriations could present serious financial and political challenges both in these countries as well as within the Union;

4. CONT calls on the Commission to take measures to avoid undue pressure on the level of payment appropriations in the first years of the MFF for the programming period 2021 to 2027; CONT calls on the budgetary authority to:

 provide for an appropriate balance between the commitment and payment appropriations for the next MFF by increasing payment appropriations, changing the commitment rules or decreasing commitment appropriations;

 in doing so, take into account the possibility of a high amount of payment claims in 2021 and 2022 and the fact that unused payment appropriations cannot be transferred to the next MFF;

 enhance the administrative capacities in Member States to allow the timely implementation of programmes; reiterates in this regard the need for increased technical assistance for Member States by the Commission to ensure that programme implementation remains within set dates and follows the legal requirements;

 

 ending the n+3 rule in line with its request in the European Commission discharge 2018; underlines the need to reduce the automatic de-commitment for the programme period 2021 - 2027 to n+2 in order to push Member States to swiftly implement the programmes;

 

 work towards simplification of applications for funding, management and facilitated reporting within programmes; underlines that an excess of regulations and procedures at national, regional and local level hamper the fulfilment of policy goals and increase the risk of so-called goldplating; highlights that such additional administrative burden constitutes an unnecessary source of error;

 

 orderly start the new Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF) and the implementation of ongoing and new programmes in the year 2021; in light of the ongoing disagreement between Member States and with Parliament about the scope of the new MFF, CONT calls on the Commission to provide a contingency plan that covers the budget 2021 and prolongs the programmes running under the current MFF to ensure planning reliability and the order of the EU budget;

Timely absorption

5. CONT is concerned that the implementation of the structural funds is lagging behind and the situation is even worse than at the comparable moment during the previous programming period: whereas currently the average absorption rate is below 40 %, it used to be below 60 % at the comparable moment during the programming period 2007 to 2013;

6.  CONT calls on the Commission to provide a report about the total sum of payments within the current MFF that are pre-planned until 2022/2023 due to the n+3 rule (programmes of the old MFF lasting until the middle of the new MFF);

7.  Our Committee calls on the Commission and the Member States concerned to establish an action plan in the first half of 2020 to speed-up the implementation of ESI Funds in the current programming period, with clear incentives for the effective absorption of available funds;

Conflicts of interest

8. CONT draws attention to Article 61 of the Financial Regulation, which entered into force on 2 August 2018; the article has broadened the definition of conflicts of interests; CONT calls on the Commission, as “Guardian of the Treaties”, to fight all forms of conflict of interests and to evaluate on a regular basis the preventive measures taken by the Member States to avoid them;

9.  CONT calls on the Commission to propose common guidelines on how conflicts of interest affecting high-profile politicians could be avoided; furthermore, CONT urges the co-legislator to adopt common ethical standards for all issues related to conflicts of interest and calls on the Commission to foster spreading best practice among Member States; CONT emphasises that given the existing problems in certain Member State about conflict of interests in the distribution of Union’s funds in shared management, it is not acceptable that some members of the European Council, certain members of national governments, and officials take decisions on the distribution and management of EU subsidies from which they themselves, their family members or oligarch structures may benefit;

EPPO

 

10. CONT underlines that the creation of the EPPO marks a qualitative leap in the protection of the Union's financial interests;

 

11.  CONT criticises the underfinancing and understaffing of the EPPO during the build-up-phase foreseen by the Commission; CONT emphasises that EPPO may have to process up to 3 000 cases per year and that it is therefore in need of at least 76 additional posts and EUR 8 million if it is to become fully operational by the end of 2020; CONT strongly calls on the Commission to present a draft amending budget; CONT stresses that any budgetary or post increase for EPPO must not be made to the detriment of OLAF`s or Eurojust`s respective budgets and establishment plans; In particular, opposes the reduction 45 posts in the establishment plan of OLAF; emphasises that OLAF already suffers from underfinancing and understaffing and that moving more resources from OLAF to EPPO could increase the risk of further misuse of EU funds going undetected; underlines that this might lead to a decrease of the EU’s traditional own resources and an increase of cross-border VAT and customs fraud, thereby negatively affecting EU revenue;

 

12.  Points out that Eurojust already faced difficulties in the international cooperation, particularly in the area of cross-border crime due to inadequate equipment; finds it unacceptable to strengthen EPPO at the expense of Eurojust; calls on the Commission to ensure adequate financing of these organisations; emphasises that EPPO, OLAF, Europol and Eurojust are all essential to combat cross-border VAT and customs fraud and prevent the misuse of EU funds;

 

13.  CONT deplores that currently strong and broad control mechanisms are in place in areas with minor errors, while in cross-border cases significantly less financial resources and personnel are deployed; points to the distinctly negative consequences for revenue collection to the detriment of the EU and by extension, the Member States;

 

14.  CONT Committee notes that according to article 3 of the EPPO regulation, the EPPO is established as an institutional body of the European Union whilst in the budget 2020 the EPPO is presented as an agency under the heading "Commission"; our Committee is concerned that this state of play does not adequately guarantee the required independence of the EPPO and calls on the Commission to present the EPPO budget as an independent organism under future heading 7 (administration) together with the other bodies and institutions instead of under future heading 2 (Commission) with Justice and Home Affairs’ agencies;

 

 

 

Yours sincerely,

 

 

 

 

 

Monika Hohlmeier

CONT Chairman and Rapporteur for the Commission discharge

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

LETTER OF THE COMMITTEE ON THE ENVIRONMENT, PUBLIC HEALTH AND FOOD SAFETY

GR/av

D(2020) 11953

Mr Johan Van Overtveldt

Chair

Committee on Budgets

BRUSSELS

Subject: <Titre>Opinion on Guidelines for the 2021 budget - Section III</Titre> <DocRef>(2019/2213(BUD))</DocRef>

Dear Mr Van Overtveldt,

Due to the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) and the subsequent modification of Parliament’s calendar of activities for the next weeks due to force majeure, ENVI will not be able to vote on its draft opinion on Guidelines for the 2021 budget - Section III (2019/2213(BUD)). Therefore, both as ENVI Chair and as Standing Rapporteur for the Budget, let me provide you with ENVI’s contribution in the form of resolution paragraphs, which hopefully will be taken into account by your committee:

COVID-19 emergency

 Highlights that the 2021 Union budget should contain resources for the development of capabilities in dealing with pandemics in order to ensure the protection of the European citizens; points to the urgent need to provide adequate funding to support research that can contribute to curtail the outbreak of Coronavirus disease COVID-2019;

 Welcomes the implementing act introduced by the Commission under the Union Civil Protection Mechanism amending the list of capacities which constitute the rescEU instrument to include stockpiling of medical equipment and treatment in the context of the COVID-19 outbreak; stresses that sufficient funding should be allocated to the Union Civil Protection Mechanism, in order to help tackle forest fires, floods, earthquakes, public health emergencies and other natural and human-made disasters, whose effects are expected to be further exacerbated by climate change; recalls that following the outbreak of the Coronavirus disease COVID-19 the Mechanism has been used to repatriate EU citizens, including from Wuhan in China; stresses that the Union Civil Protection Mechanism must be sufficiently funded to address the COVID-19 outbreak to save lives, including through the allocation of additional funding in response and for capacities;

 Stresses that the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) must be allocated adequate human resources capacity to respond optimally to the current COVID-19 outbreak; recalls that in the period 2013-2018 the number of full time employees in the ECDC was reduced by 20 and asks that its original establishment plan be urgently restored;

 Stress the need for any future recovery plan or financial tool using EU money in the context of the COVID-19 economic downturn to be aligned with the Green Deal priorities;

European Green Deal, 2021 budget and MFF

 Points to the need to ensure that sufficient resources are allocated in the 2021 budget to allow the Union to rapidly take the concrete actions needed to address the climate, biodiversity and environment emergency; insists that the next budget should help the Union to meet its commitment under the European Green Deal and its obligations under the Paris Agreement and be fully aligned with the objectives of limiting global warming to under 1.5 °C, and reversing the decline in biodiversity;

 Stresses that the 2021 Union budget should pave the way to the full and efficient implementation of the ambition outlined in the Commission's communication on the European Green Deal, with a view to aligning all Union policies with its objectives ; considers that the Union should show global climate leadership also through its budgeting;

 Calls on the Commission to implement green budgeting tools as of 2021; underlines in this regard the importance of effective climate proofing of the budget, to ensure that the budget as a whole is in line with the Paris agreement, and of biodiversity proofing; calls on the Commission to provide horizontal guidance on climate and biodiversity proofing to guide all policy planning documents for the next MFF;

 Highlights that the 2021 Union budget is the first one under the multiannual financial framework (MFF) for 2021-2027; stresses that every effort should be made, right from the beginning of the new MFF, to ensure that the overall climate and biodiversity mainstreaming target are reached as soon as possible; reiterates the ENVI position of 5 September 2019 to set a 40% target for climate mainstreaming in the next MFF;

 Points out that climate and biodiversity-related expenditure must be tracked using more robust, transparent and comprehensive methodology, which is needed in order to avoid the risk of overestimation of the allocated funds; recalls its position in support of a clear spending target for biodiversity mainstreaming of at least 10 % in the next MFF, in addition to the target for spending on climate mainstreaming, which should be reflected in the 2021 Union budget;

  Calls on the European Council to endorse new own resources, such as a recycled plastic tax and the use of ETS revenue in the EU budget in line with the position of the Parliament[15];

 Points to the need to ensure sufficient resources in the 2021 budget for the achievement of the UN Sustainable Development Goals;

 Emphasises that in achieving the Union’s climate and environmental ambitions, sufficient resources should be allocated for achieving a just transition, underlines that burdens should be carried according to the polluter pays principle and not placed on the most vulnerable people and communities; stresses that the resources for the just transition fund should be additional and not be to the detriment of other EU programmes;

 Stresses that adequate resources should be allocated in the 2021 budget for the drawing-up and implementation of the future European plan to fight cancer; highlights that sufficient funding should also be allocated to tackle rare and non-communicable diseases, with special focus on research and prevention, as well as on fighting antimicrobial resistance;

 Points to the importance of ensuring that sufficient financial resources are allocated in the 2021 budget to ensure adequate and predictable funding for the Union agencies, enabling them to fulfil their mandate and execute their tasks;

 

I have sent a similar letter to Mr Pierre Larrouturou, general rapporteur for the 2021 budget.

 

Yours sincerely,

 

Pascal CANFIN


 

 

 

LETTER OF THE COMMITTEE ON INDUSTRY, RESEARCH AND ENERGY

Mr Johan Van Overtveldt

Chair

Committee on Budgets

BRUSSELS

Subject: <Titre>Opinion on Guidelines for the 2021 Budget - Section III</Titre> <DocRef>(2019/2213(BUD))</DocRef>

Dear Mr Chair,

Given the exceptional situation we are currently facing, ITRE coordinators decided to submit the ITRE opinion on the guidelines for the 2021 budget in form of this letter, based on the work already carried out in committee.

 

The Committee on Industry, Research and Energy calls on the Committee on Budgets, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions into its motion for a resolution,

Yours sincerely,

Cristian‑Silviu Buşoi

 

SUGGESTIONS

1. Regrets that the Member States have so far not managed to reach an agreement on the Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF) 2021-2027 and the reform of the own resources system, which puts at risk the timely start and functioning of the new programmes and thus the Union’s ability to achieve its political priorities, including the European Green Deal and thus contributing to reducing greenhouse gas emissions to net-zero by 2050; notes that the MFF is the basis for the annual budget and that, in the absence of an MFF regulation, guidelines on the 2021 budget can only reflect Parliament’s general position on the MFF;

2. Stresses that the 2021 budget must enable the Union to meet its obligations under the Paris Agreement, including the principle of ‘do no harm’, and align with the objective of limiting global warming to under 1.5°C; in this regard insists that the next budget should focus on sustainable development, energy transition, job creation and reversing biodiversity loss; recalls that climate change spending efforts need to be stepped up to at least 25% of EU expenditure over the new MFF period, and to 30% as soon as possible, while respecting higher specific targets in other programmes such as the 35% agreed in Horizon Europe;

3. Adds that one of the main political priorities is to ensure competitiveness and sustainability of EU industries, which includes reducing administrative burden, including that of EU programmes and revising the current EU state aid rules without compromising the functioning of the internal market; believes that economic prosperity is directly linked with global industrial competitiveness and efficient climate policies; insists that significant investments in innovation, including in digital technologies and energy-intensive sectors will be needed to strengthen competitiveness, develop future skills and create jobs;

4. Underlines that the new Heading 1 (‘Single Market, Innovation and Digital’) will be instrumental for boosting innovation-led, sustainable economic growth and incremental and disruptive research and innovation with the aim of contributing to the transition towards a climate-neutral economy and society by 2050 in line with the Paris Agreement; highlights furthermore the importance of the new Heading 5 (‘Security and Defence’), which includes the new European Defence Fund and funds for nuclear safety and decommissioning;

5. Recalls Parliament’s position on the overall financial envelope for Horizon Europe of EUR 120 billion (in 2018 prices) as well as the continuous oversubscription of the programme over the course of the last MFF, which means that many more high-quality projects in the field of research and innovation could have been funded if sufficient Union funding had been provided; calls on the Commission to present the 2021 draft budget accordingly to ensure that research and innovation activities will be ambitiously funded without disruption, including in areas that are essential for the EU’s strategic autonomy and international competitiveness, that support the transition to a climate-neutral economy by 2050 and the overall goals of the European Green Deal and to achieving the SDGs and benefit its citizens and society, such as digital transformation, mobility, energy, healthcare and space, and to support market deployment of innovative products and services; recalls in this context the need for a balanced support for fundamental and applied research; calls for a reduction of regional imbalances of R&I capacities within the EU; reminds that research and innovation partnerships are effective means to foster collaborative research and engage industry in the programme, and should thus be strengthened; stresses furthermore the need to coordinate science and research activities beyond the European borders and therefore ensure a proper framework for international cooperation;

6. Underlines that all areas of the budget need to contribute to the overall goals of the European Green Deal and the UN Sustainable Development Goals; reiterates the considerable financing needs and additional investments required for the implementation for these objectives; recalls in this context the importance of the introduction of a Just Transition Fund to address societal, socio-economic, technological and environmental impacts on workers, sectors and communities adversely affected by the transition from coal and carbon dependence, and calls for solid financing of the fund and that the methodology on the allocation of funds needs to guarantee that no region of the EU is left behind in the energy transition; reiterates in this respect the Parliament’s position that new instruments should be financed with fresh money rather than reducing other EU programmes;

7. Stresses the importance of the Connecting Europe Facility as a key instrument to reach the goals of the Energy Union and to facilitate the Union’s commitment under the Paris Agreement and calls for adequate appropriations for the programme, in particular for its energy strand, and insists that the selection of priority energy infrastructure projects needs to be aligned with the European Green Deal; underlines the need to support a transformation of the European mobility sector in order to achieve sustainable, clean and competitive transport in the Union:

8. Underlines the need for an ambitious draft budget, in particular for new programmes such as the Digital Europe Programme, which aims to boost investments in vital future areas such as artificial intelligence, cybersecurity, supercomputing and advanced digital skills, which need to become operational as soon as possible in order to help make the EU more competitive and contribute to bridging the digital divide both with regard to the gender gap in the ICT sector and the geographical imbalance on digital readiness between Member States; calls furthermore for the use of all possible EU programmes to make Europe fit for the digital age and achieve digital sovereignty; strongly opposes any cuts as compared to the Commission proposal, especially in areas that aim at ensuring a human-centric digital society, underlines the crucial role of the digitalisation of public administrations and the interoperability of IT systems at all levels of government in the interest of citizens and businesses;

9. Underlines the importance of SMEs, micro enterprises and start-ups as an essential part of the EU economy, as they provide a high number of jobs, including the majority of new jobs in the EU and recalls that SMEs play a vital role in research and innovation as well as in the uptake of R&I results; calls for stronger support in the 2021 budget for SMEs as well as SME clusters and networks; urges the Commission to ensure adequate financing and smooth transition from COSME to the new Single Market Programme and from the European Fund for Strategic Investment (EFSI) and other financial instruments to InvestEU; stresses the need to facilitate access to finance for SMEs throughout the entire research, development and innovation cycle and welcomes in this context the role of the European Innovation Council (EIC);

10. Recalls Parliament's position on the overall financial envelope of the space programme of EUR 15 billion (in 2018 prices); calls on the Commission in this regard to present the 2021 draft budget accordingly; warns of the risk of insufficient financing undermining existing flagship programmes like Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus as well as the launch of important new programmes, namely GovSatCom and Space Situational Awareness (SSA), limiting the European leadership in relevant sectors such as security, defence, civil and environmental protection and public services; stresses the importance of the space programme to contribute to the goals of the European Green Deal and ensuring proper monitoring of its progress; regrets that the Commission in its proposal did not sufficiently increase the human and financial resources of the new European Union Agency for the Space Programme after the provisional inter-institutional agreement broadening the list of EUSPA’s tasks;

11. Recalls the important role that EU agencies play in helping to achieve policy objectives set by the legislator; calls therefore for sufficient funding and staffing for all agencies in line with their tasks and responsibilities; underlines in particular the need to substantially reinforce the European Agency for the Cooperation of Energy Regulators (ACER), which has been underfunded and understaffed for many years, risking to jeopardise ACER’s functioning and its ability to perform its tasks on monitoring and market transparency as well as the additional tasks conferred on it through recent legislation including the Clean Energy Package; insists that the Commission address this problem already in its draft budget; furthermore recalls the need for additional resources for the BEREC Office to match with its tasks enshrined in the BEREC Regulation and the European Electronic Communications Code.


 

 

 

LETTER OF THE COMMITTEE ON THE INTERNAL MARKET AND CONSUMER PROTECTION

Mr Johan van Overtveldt

Chair

Committee on Budgets

BRUSSELS

Subject: <Titre>Opinion on Guidelines for the 2021 Budget - Section III</Titre> <DocRef>(2019/2213(BUD)) - Rapporteur for opinion, Mr Leszek Miller</DocRef>

Dear Chair,

Under the procedure referred to above, the Committee on the Internal Market and Consumer Protection has decided to submit an opinion to your committee in the form of a letter.

The Committee decided to call on the Committee on Budgets, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the suggestions in annex to this letter into its motion for a resolution.

 

Yours sincerely,

Petra De Sutter, MD, PhD

Chairwoman

 

 

Annex: Suggestions

 

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on the Internal Market and Consumer Protection calls on the Committee on Budget, as the committee responsible, to take into account the following suggestions into its motion for a resolution:

A. whereas the 2021 Union budget is the first one under the multiannual financial framework (MFF) for 2021-2027;

 

B. whereas the Parliament has been ready to negotiate the new MFF since November 2018, but the Council has, so far, failed to engage in fully-fledged negotiations, whereas the window of opportunity for reaching an agreement is constantly shrinking;

 

C. whereas the internal market is since its inception a major contributor to growth, competitiveness and employment in the Union which has allowed persons, goods, services and capital to move more freely in the Union, has generated new opportunities and economies of scale for European businesses, notably micro, small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), has contributed to the creation of jobs and has offered greater choice at lower prices for consumers while guaranteeing their protection and the high quality of products and services offered; whereas the internal market is a core element in achieving the transformation into a resource- and energy-efficient sustainable economy to respond to the increasing pressure of climate change; whereas the completion of the Single Market should remain one of the priorities in the 2021 Budget;

 

D. whereas the Digital Single Market (DSM) should be seen as one of the key elements of the overall Single Market, whose effective implementation is a sine qua non condition for the effective functioning of the Single Market as a whole benefiting both the citizens and the businesses;

 

1. Welcomes the EP budget section III rapporteur´s ambition of 883 million EUR (in 2018 prices) for the Single Market programme for the year 2021 that corresponds to the Parliament proposal for the next MFF (2021-2027) made of a significant increase of expenditure on the Single Market cluster in comparison to the Commission’s proposal by almost half (i.e. by 48.5%, in 2018 prices), taking into account the expected spending profile for that programme, which clearly demonstrates its importance; stresses the need to maintain these proportions of appropriations in the forthcoming negotiations; expresses  disappointment with the revised 2021-2027 MFF-OR “negotiating box” presented by the President of European Council, which reduces the appropriations for the Single Market Programme by estimated 57.1%;

 

2. Urges Member States to maintain high level of commitments for the new Single Market Programme[16] (including former COSME actions), which addresses the Single Market fragmentation, empowering and protecting consumers and enabling micro and small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) to take full advantage of a well-functioning Single Market which is indispensable for development of European economy while focusing on sustainability;

 

3. Welcomes the Commission’s Communications on “Shaping Europe's digital future” and on “A European strategy for data” as well as the Commission’s White Paper on Artificial intelligence, since all three initiatives contain important reflections linked to consumer protection and harmonised rules for companies in the Single Market; stresses the importance of sufficient funding for the Commission’s digital initiatives as part of the MFF-related programmes;

 

4. Welcomes the Commission's proposed new initiatives for the European Green Deal, and in particular on "Empowering the consumer for the green transition" since promoting the commitment of consumers to sustainable consumption patterns is key to deliver on the Green Deal priorities; stresses the importance of raising consumer awareness and directing funding towards actions promoting sustainable consumption, as part of the future consumer policies in the Single Market Programme (MFF);

 

5. Underlines that in order to achieve comprehensive sustainable consumption patterns, single market’s rules are key in order to incentivise products and services, processes and business models aimed at achieving circularity through sustainability and durability requirements in line with the European Green Deal’s objectives; recalls that in order to support the transition of our economy towards sustainability while preserving our competitiveness, adequate funding of targeted actions should be ensured through the Single Market Programme (MFF);

 

6. Calls for allocation of the additional resources towards full implementation of the Single Digital Gateway, which may be facing delays in multiple Member States; notes that eGovernment programmes aiming at modernization of a public administration and addressing digitalisation of public services offer added value for everyone involved in the Single Market, especially citizens and business; reminds the need to allocate sufficient funds to unlock ambitious projects in this area;

 

7. Recalls that consumer protection is one of the most substantial areas of EU policy for citizens, which supports especially the consumers in vulnerable situations; underlines the constant need to improve the consumer policy, especially in light of the emerging challenges both in the digital and physical areas through adequate financing and enforcement of existing provisions aimed particularly at combatting the unfair commercial practices within the Single Market;

 

8. Stresses that effective enforcement of single market’s rules plays an important role in consumer protection policy by making sure that consumers are offered safe and compliant products and services, both on the online and offline markets; highlights the need for greater cooperation between market surveillance authorities at EU level and need for strengthening the existing framework; calls therefore for specific funding in this area under the Single Market Programme (MFF);

 

9. Stresses the importance of an increase in the level of commitment appropriations for the modernisation of the customs union, in support of the implementation of the Union Customs Code (Code) and of the development of the electronic customs systems; notes that in the Single Market policy cluster only the appropriations for financing the Customs programme are foreseen, considers, however, that financing of Customs Control Instrument[17] should also be included in this cluster; stresses at the same time that cuts of 31% foreseen in the proposal put forward by the President of the European Council on CUSTOMS program and on the instrument for financial support for customs control equipment jeopardise meeting the objectives of both programs;

 

10. Concerns that the failure of the Council to agree on a negotiating position could delay negotiations with the Parliament and implies the risk of delaying the entry into force of programmes due to start in 2021, in particular the new Single Market Programme, as well as CUSTOMS program and the Customs Control Instrument -which is not a continuation of an existing programme but a new initiative.


 

 

 

LETTER OF THE COMMITTEE ON TRANSPORT AND TOURISM

Mr Johan Van Overtveldt

Chair

Committee on Budgets

BRUSSELS

Subject: <Titre>Opinion on Guidelines for the 2021 Budget – Section III</Titre> <DocRef>(2019/2213(BUD))</DocRef>

Dear Mr Chair,

Under the procedure referred to above, the Committee on Transport and Tourism has been asked to submit an opinion to your committee. On 23 March 2020, TRAN Coordinators decided to send the opinion in the form of a letter.

The Committee on Transport and Tourism calls on the Committee on Budgets to incorporate the following suggestions into its motion for a resolution.

Yours sincerely,

 

((signed)) Karima Delli

SUGGESTIONS

1. Calls for an ambitious budget for the EU transport sector, which takes into account emerging challenges and opportunities and the current political priorities in terms of EU transport and tourism policy;

 

2. Stresses that EU transport policy is essential for Europe’s economic, social and environmental development and its sustainability and for ensuring the territorial accessibility and connectivity of all regions of the EU; strongly requests, therefore, that EU transport policy receive adequate and sufficient funding in order to develop sustainable transport modes and to secure growth, jobs and competitiveness in Europe, including in the outermost, insular or disadvantaged geographical areas; stresses the importance of additional investments in research and innovation, and in social and territorial cohesion, for meeting environmental challenges and for increasing and consolidating cross-border and interregional connectivity;

 

3. Underlines that the 2021 budget should reflect the priorities set out by Parliament in its resolution of 14 November 2018 on the multiannual financial framework (MFF) and that it must provide the necessary financing for both projects started under the current MFF and for new projects based on the 2021-2027 MFF; reiterates, therefore, the importance of providing for a contingency plan to protect beneficiaries and ensure the projects’ continuity in the event that the current MFF needs to be extended beyond 2020;

 

4. Believes EU transport financing must be aligned accordingly to the Green Deal’s regulatory requirements and that full alignment with the Paris Agreement should be guaranteed; and stresses thus that a high level of funding, result oriented and efficient use of funds in the Horizon 2020 transport portfolio, programmes and joint undertakings delivering these objectives are of utmost importance; and highlights the importance of projects and programmes in the fields of decarbonisation,  digitalisation and just transition;

 

The importance of transport in achieving the goals of the Green Deal

 

5. Reiterates that transport must contribute to achieving climate neutrality by 2050 that will require huge financial investments, and must not harm the overall competitiveness of European industry on the world market;

 

6. Underlines, therefore, that appropriate funding for transport projects will be instrumental in accelerating the shift to sustainable, safe, smart, interoperable, and affordable mobility through measures based on new technologies, boosting multimodal transport, the development of automated and connected multimodal mobility and an increase in the production and deployment of sustainable alternative fuels including recharging points;

 

7. Highlights the importance of the Green Deal being accompanied by a just, inclusive and non-discriminatory transition to ensure the transport sector’s businesses, SMEs and workforce can adjust, and to support the regions and communities most affected; considers it important to have proper funding for this adjustment process, including incentives for sustainable investment, as well as  training and equipping the sector’s workforce with new expertise for new job prospects, requirements and skills;

 

8. Stresses that public transport is central to the promotion of environmentally, climatically and economically sustainable societies and to tackle social exclusion and the negative trend of depopulation in isolated low-density areas; calls in this regard for increased support for transport infrastructure and the promotion of public transport and sustainable mobility; the 2021 budget should support the introduction of an action plan to implement a single multi-modal ticketing system; recommends that studies be carried out to assess the effects of free public transport systems regarding factors such as variations in passenger numbers, travel times, the number of traffic accidents and casualties or impact on climate change;

 

Boosting the flagship programmes

 

9. Underlines the importance of increasing the budget of flagship programmes of particular relevance to achieving EU goals:

 Emphasises the crucial role of the Connecting Europe Facility (CEF) in fostering the development of a high-performance trans-European network (TEN-T) that is sustainable and interconnected across the areas of transport, energy and digital services infrastructure and in achieving the goals of the Green Deal; reiterates that the swift completion of the TEN-T will make a significant contribution to socio-economic and territorial cohesion in the EU and to the promotion of the EU’s decarbonisation objectives; requests, therefore, that the CEF-Transport budget be increased for the MFF 2021-2027 and that its allocation for 2021 be decided accordingly including paying full respect to differences between infrastructural development among Member States; recalls that the CEF’s short-, mid- and long- term planning of spending should take into consideration a result-oriented approach and seek for and EU added value; deplores the delays in the completion of works in several Member States, especially as regards cross-border projects;

 Requests an increase in the budget of Horizon 2020 to EUR 120 billion (2018 prices) and its ‘Smart Cities and Integrated Transport’ component accordingly, starting from 2021;

Maintaining existing policies

 

10. Recalls that cohesion policy funding for transport infrastructure should aim at pursuing the Treaty-based objective of EU economic, social and territorial cohesion; highlights the crucial role that EU transport policy and investment plays in promoting and enhancing territorial, social and economic cohesion in the EU; requests, therefore, that the funding of TEN-T be maintained as part of cohesion policy including the support component for the development and modernisation of secondary, regional and local links;

Specific allocation for sustainable tourism

 

11. Believes that the tourism sector is extremely related to the transport sector; strongly repeat its call to establish a separate and dedicated budget line for sustainable tourism to better reflect current and future needs in terms of infrastructure and security,  the importance of tourism in the EU economy, as fourth largest export industry, and its role for competitiveness, employment and social wellbeing development;

Financing of new initiatives

 

12. Supports an increase in the allocation for sustainable infrastructure of the InvestEU Fund to EUR 14 billion (2018 prices) for 2021-2027 with an appropriate allocation in the 2021 budget;

13. Stresses the importance of a simpler, more efficient own resources system able to bring a substantial reduction in the proportion of GNI-based contributions and to guarantee the adequate funding of EU spending;

Agencies and European partnerships

14. Stresses the important role of agencies and European partnerships in improving the transport sector’s performance and safety and in fostering a reduction of transport emissions based on technological progress and rules; considers the creation of a European partnership for the maritime sector crucial to the fostering of research and innovation in this mode of transport; points out the importance of these agencies and joint undertakings receiving adequate financial, human resources and effective management in order to ensure the full deployment of their tasks; calls on the Commission to monitor agencies’ financial and administrative management more actively, especially as regards conflicts of interest;

15. Highlights in particular the crucial role of the European Union Agency for Railways (ERA) and the Shift2Rail Joint Undertaking in achieving a lasting shift from road to rail; stresses that the Shift2Rail undertaking plays a key role in overcoming technical obstacles and driving forward interoperability, with the aim, ultimately, of making rail transport cheaper, more efficient and more attractive contributing to reducing accidents and CO2 emissions;

16. Highlights in particular the role of the Clean Sky 2 and SESAR Joint Undertakings and of the European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) in reducing CO2 emissions by passenger; stresses the very good results and the essential role played by the Clean Sky 2 Joint Undertaking in ensuring net accelerations in green technologies aimed to improve safety and to reduce the CO2 and greenhouse gas emissions, as well as the noise levels produced by aircraft; calls for a stronger EASA involvement in the monitoring of the research performed by the 2 undertakings and the need to deploy quickly the environmental labelling programme, making use of the EASA competences in certifying technologies; stresses the urgency to induce connectivity and increase efficiency by defragmenting European airspace through initiatives aiming to increase safety, reduce delays and the environmental impact of air traffic;

17. Welcomes the direct support of the European Maritime Safety Agency (EMSA) to Member States’ efforts in implementing environmental legislation and its assistance in tackling maritime pollution and in monitoring emissions; believes that with further resources, the Agency can play an important role in supporting Member States in mitigating shipping-related environmental and in improving the sustainability of the maritime sector.

 


 

LETTER OF THE COMMITTEE ON REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT

 

 

Mr Johan VAN OVERTVELDT

Chair of the Committee on Budgets

WIE 05U012

BRUSSELS


Subject: <Titre>Opinion on the Guidelines for the 2021 Budget – section III – 2019/2213 (BUD))</Titre>Dear Mr Van Overtveldt,

 

Under the procedure referred to above, the Committee on Regional Development has been asked to submit an opinion to your committee. The committee has decided to send the opinion in the form of a letter.

 

* * *

 

Whereas pursuant to Article 174 of the TFEU, economic, social and territorial cohesion are recognised as the key elements of harmonious development of the Union and the MFF as such should not fail to support fully this EU objective.

 

Underlines that the EU budget for 2021 will be the first EU budget under MFF 2021-2027 and should give a clear message and depict clearly the Parliament’s position for the next seven years, reflect the Union’s political priorities and insure the implementation of EU programmes supporting and enhancing economic, social and territorial cohesion; recalls that these programmes and policies support and contribute significantly to sustainable solutions for economic growth, investments and competitiveness, as well as safe and secure working and living conditions of the citizens, including equal opportunities and non-discrimination.

 

Considers that investments made under cohesion and regional development policy show very high added value in terms of the share of funding throughout the European Union; and they contribute to the EU priorities and objectives such as Green deal, innovation and digital economy; emphasizes that sustainable development, economic growth and continuous pursuit of the overall and inclusive cohesion, by reducing differences and inequalities in the Member States and regions of Europe, are universal and fundamental goals of the existence of the European Union.

 

Reiterates that the sufficient funds are necessary in order to achieve these goals, as well as the ambitious, fair, smooth and inclusive transition and climate neutral Europe; reminds in this context cohesion policy contribution to research and innovation activities fostering the transfer of advanced technologies;  notes that the Just Transition Fund (JTF) needs to be adjusted with adequate financial means so that no one is left behind and it can be efficiently implemented in Member States, in order to protect citizens in coal and polluted industrial areas, but also in insular and remote areas, the most vulnerable to the climate transition; underlines in this regard the necessity to secure the financial resources already for the year 2021, ensuring that "traditional" and core policies such as Cohesion and Common Agricultural Policy are not undermined. Furthermore, reiterates its demand for a contingency plan to ensure continuity of funding in the event that the current MFF needs to be extended beyond 2020, demands that the Commission present such a plan without delay in order to avoid any delays in the start of the new programmes and to ensure smooth and continuous support to beneficiaries.

Notes that the economic impact of the global spread of Covid-19 in 2020 is forecast to likely lead to new periods of recession in more than one Member State, therefore extraordinary financial resources should be allocated for this purpose in the EU budget for 2021.

Yours sincerely,

Younous Omarjee

 

 


 

LETTER OF THE COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT

Mr Johan Van Overtveldt

Chair

Committee on Budgets

BRUSSELS

Subject: <Titre>Opinion on Guidelines for the 2021 Budget - Section III </Titre> <DocRef>(2019/2213 (BUD))</DocRef>

Dear Mr Van Overtveldt,

Under the procedure referred to above, the Committee on Agriculture and Rural Development has been asked to submit an opinion to your committee. At its meeting of 22 January 2020, the committee decided to send the opinion in the form of a letter.

The Committee on Agriculture and Rural Development considered the matter on 26 March with a written procedure. It decided to call on the Committee on Budgets, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions into its motion for a resolution.

Yours sincerely,

(signed) Norbert Lins

 

SUGGESTIONS

A. whereas 2021 should be the first year of implementation the next multiannual financial framework (MFF) and whereas the Commission shall propose a new budgetary structure;

B. whereas the Commission has proposed a revision of the common agricultural policy (CAP) that includes 3 distinct legislative proposals and whereas the entry into force of the newly reformed CAP will, almost certainly, not take place in 2021;

C. whereas the Commission has proposed a regulation laying down certain transitional provisions for the support by the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development (EAFRD) and by the European Agricultural Guarantee Fund (EAGF) as regard their resources and application in the year 2021;

D. whereas Agriculture and Rural Development domain will remain the biggest share of the Budget’s expenditures because, unlike in most other sectors, spending at Union level largely replaces national spending; whereas it is essential to ensure that any new demands made of the agricultural sector as a result of the European Green Deal are adequately supported by additional budgetary resources;

1. Calls on the Commission to propose a budgetary structure that is compliant with the general principles of unity, universality, annuality, specification and in particular the principles of transparency and sound financial management to allow the Parliament to fully exercise its scrutiny power; therefore, urges the Commission to propose a budgetary structure for Agriculture and Rural Development that is detailed enough, like it is the case for the current MFF;

2. Takes note that the CAP, together with other Union policies, will have an important role to play in fulfilling the Green Deal ’ambitions;

3. Reiterates Parliament’s position that the CAP budget should be maintained at current level at the very least, especially in light of the new demands that will be made of it to contribute to the Union’s climate and biodiversity objectives, in line with the Paris Agreement, and also in the fields of food security, economic growth, territorial and social balance, health and economic crises, markets at risk of volatility or closure, as well as other factors affecting food security;

4. Calls on the Commission to take into account in its proposal and subsequent amending act for the draft Budget 2021, the outcome of the political agreement to be reached on the transitional measures for the year 2021 (COM(2019)0581, 2019/0254(COD))"; further calls on Member States for timely allocation of sufficient resources for continued improvement of the quality of data and indicators reported to the Union in order to fully comply with the “Budget for Result” policy; insists on the high quality of data and indicators to properly assess the CAP;

5. Urges Member States to tackle the demographic problem and lack of generational renewal faced by the agricultural sector and further insists to give sufficient support measures for young farmers and gender equality in rural area;

6. Continues to insist that revenue to the Union budget deriving from any assigned revenues or repayments of irregularities from agriculture in previous years should remain under this domain;

7. Recalls the necessity to dedicate a significant share of the funds from the Horizon Europe programme to the agri-food sector, especially in the broader context of the “Farm to Fork Strategy”; is convinced of the importance of research, development and innovation in this sector and of ensuring that the results of research and innovation reach farm level; support increasing the programme’s appropriations to ensure safe, high quality food and innovative forms of agriculture in the Union;

8. Asks for continued support for ongoing and new pilot project and preparatory actions.


 

 

 

LETTER OF THE COMMITTEE ON CULTURE AND EDUCATION

Mr Johan Van Overtveldt

Chair

Committee on Budgets

BRUSSELS

Subject: <Titre>Opinion on the Guidelines for the 2021 Budget, Section III</Titre> <DocRef>(2019/2213 (BUD))</DocRef>

Dear Mr Chair,

Under the procedure referred to above, the Committee on Culture and Education has been asked to submit an opinion to your committee.

On behalf of the CULT Committee and in close coordination with Romeo Franz, CULT rapporteur on the 2021 Budget, I would like to submit the following suggestions to you on the 2021 Budget. The suggestions should be regarded as the CULT Committee contribution to the ‘Guidelines for the 2021 Budget’ that the Committee on Budgets is preparing.

 

Yours sincerely,

Sabine Verheyen

 

SUGGESTIONS

1. Reaffirms the importance of programmes in the fields of youth, citizenship, education and culture and the need to provide the necessary funding to meet citizens’ expectations and the ambitious objectives set for those programmes; believes that duly increased funding is crucial for the future of Europe and would enable more participants to enjoy the benefits of the programmes, particularly those with fewer opportunities; considers that cultural, educational and creative programmes have the capacity to both strengthen their social objectives with a special focus on inclusion and geographical balance and contribute to the Union’s goal of tackling global challenges such as climate change and digitalisation among others; insists that the 2021 budget be significantly higher than the 2020 budget and followed by linear and gradual growth in annual allocations so as to widen access from year one and avoid disproportionate increases and absorption challenges in the final years of the 2021-2027 Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF); urges the Commission to present a contingency plan in order to ensure the continued financing of all Union funding programmes from the beginning of 2021 in the event that it is not possible to successfully conclude the MFF negotiations by the end of 2020; reiterates that a strong emphasis needs to be placed on the societal challenges triggered by climate change and that the budget allocated for Erasmus+, the European Solidarity Corps and the Creative Europe programme match the political ambitions of the programmes and foster sustainable development and environmental transition; stresses that education and culture are key areas of shaping and promoting gender equality and thus calls for the inclusion of gender mainstreaming and gender budgeting principles in all programmes and when addressing societal challenges;

 

2. Recalls the fact that Erasmus+ is the leading programme for promoting learning mobility among people of all ages and all social groups, with applications significantly exceeding the funding available; stresses that the Erasmus+ programme is the European success story, bringing people together, developing interpersonal and working skills, promoting intercultural learning and supporting a genuine European sense of belonging; reiterates, therefore, that the 2021 budget must be in line with the demand to triple the Erasmus+ budget under the 2021-2027 MFF; stresses that new initiatives in the fields of citizenship, youth, education and culture, such as the European Universities Initiative in the new Erasmus programme, could contribute to the Future of Europe debates and have a real impact on citizens’ lives as well as their perception of the Union; underlines, however, that the support of Parliament for new initiatives depends on the final amounts of the programmes’ budgets; reiterates in that regard that new initiatives need fresh money;

 

3. Underlines the value of the Creative Europe programme in supporting the Union’s audio-visual, creative and cultural industries and sectors; recalls the fact that the programme was substantially underfunded, which was reflected in persistently low funding success rates for projects in the current programme, especially in the culture strand; insists on the need for essential increased funding in order to meet the objectives of the programme and citizens’ expectations; recalls the fact that the 2021 budget must be in line with the need for double funding for the Creative Europe programme under the 2021-2027 MFF; calls on the Commission to improve its external communication strategy and thus citizens’ access to information on the Union’s activities; reiterates the need for the Commission to consider new ways and means to communicate on Union affairs; calls, therefore, on the Commission to further diversify the information tools currently used and promoted in the context of ‘multimedia activities’;

 

4.  Considers that the European Solidarity Corps is a fundamental tool for promoting civic engagement across the Union and strengthening Union citizenship; insists that the 2021 budget for the European Solidarity Corps be consistent with the many expectations it has raised among young people across Europe, particularly in the volunteering strand; calls for sufficient funding to be allocated to cover the high demand of volunteering placements;

 

5.  Underlines the success of the Europe for Citizens programme and its significance in enhancing a sense of belonging to the Union and fostering the democratic and civic participation of citizens as well as citizens’ engagement in the actions of the Union; reiterates the need to provide the essential increased funding for the ‘Citizens’ Engagement and Participation’ strand within the new Citizens, Equality, Rights and Values programme, and recalls that it must correspond to 27,26  % of the programme’s total budget;

 

6.  Is concerned about the situation resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic crisis; calls on the Commission to take all necessary measures to support the beneficiaries of Union programmes in the fields of culture and education; stresses the need for additional support for the creative sector, which is severely hit by the crisis; calls on the Commission to develop a coordinated approach amongst the Member States so that sufficient investment is made in the fields of culture, education, youth and citizenship after the COVID-19 pandemic crisis with the aim of avoiding a similar situation to that of the aftermath of the financial and economic crisis in 2009 where public spending in those areas declined significantly in the Union.


 

 

 

LETTER OF THE COMMITTEE ON CIVIL LIBERTIES, JUSTICE AND HOME AFFAIRS

Mr Johan Van Overtveldt

Chair

Committee on Budgets

BRUSSELS

 

 

Subject: <Titre>Opinion on general guidelines for the preparation of the 2021 budget, Section III – Commission</Titre> <DocRef>(2019/2213(BUD))</DocRef>

Dear Mr Chair,

Under the procedure referred to above, the Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs has been asked to submit an opinion to your committee in line with what has been decided by Written Procedure dated 19 March 2020.

The Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs calls on the Committee on Budgets, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions into its general guidelines for the preparation of the 2021 budget, Section III – Commission.

 

Yours sincerely,

(signed) Juan Fernando López Aguilar

 

SUGGESTIONS

 having regard to the special report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) of 8 October 2018 on Global Warming of 1.5°C[18],

 having regard to Article 314 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU),

 having regard to Article 106a of the Treaty establishing the European Atomic Energy Community,

 having regard to Regulation (EU, Euratom) 2018/1046 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 18 July 2018 on the financial rules applicable to the general budget of the Union, amending Regulations (EU) No 1296/2013, (EU) No 1301/2013, (EU) No 1303/2013, (EU) No 1304/2013, (EU) No 1309/2013, (EU) No 1316/2013, (EU) No 223/2014, (EU) No 283/2014, and Decision No 541/2014/EU and repealing Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 966/2012[19],

 having regard to Council Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 1311/2013 of 2 December 2013 laying down the multiannual financial framework for the years 2014-2020[20],

 having regard to the Interinstitutional Agreement of 2 December 2013 between the European Parliament, the Council and the Commission on budgetary discipline, on cooperation in budgetary matters and on sound financial management[21],

 having regard to Council Decision 2014/335/EU, Euratom of 26 May 2014 on the system of own resources of the European Union[22],

 having regard to the general budget of the European Union for the financial year 2020[23] and the joint statements agreed between Parliament, the Council and the Commission annexed thereto,

 having regard to its interim report of 14 November 2018 on the multiannual financial framework 2021-2027 – Parliament’s position with a view to an agreement[24] and to its resolution of 10 October 2019 on the 2021-2027 multiannual financial framework and own resources: time to meet citizens’ expectations[25],

 having regard to its resolution of 15 January 2020 on the European Green Deal[26],

 having regard to the Council conclusions of … 2020 on the 2021 budget guidelines (00000/2019),

 having regard to Rule 93 of its Rules of Procedure,

 having regard to the report of the Committee on Budgets (A9-0110/2020),

A. whereas pursuant to Article 311 of the TFEU, the Union shall provide itself with the means necessary to attain its policy objectives and the budget shall be financed wholly from own resources;

B. whereas pursuant to Article 312 of the TFEU, the multiannual financial framework (MFF) shall be adopted by the Council by unanimity after obtaining the consent of the European Parliament by a majority of its component members;

C. whereas the current MFF ends at the end of 2020, and whereas 2021 should be the first year of implementation of the next one;

D. whereas Parliament has been ready to negotiate the MFF since November 2018, but the Council has so far failed to engage in any meaningful talks with Parliament beyond minimal contact on the margins of the General Affairs Council; whereas the timeframe for reaching an agreement in the European Council has been repeatedly extended;

E. whereas should a new MFF not be adopted on time, several EU programmes could risk being shut down because their legal basis will have ceased to apply; whereas in such a scenario, a safety net in the form of a temporary extension of the ceilings and other provisions of the last year of the present framework would have to be set up in accordance with Article 312(4) of the TFEU;

F. whereas in accordance with Article 2(1)(c) of the Paris Agreement, finance flows should be made ‘consistent with a pathway towards low greenhouse gas emissions and climate-resilient development’;

G. whereas the current Commission has branded itself as geopolitical and displayed an ambition to tackle climate and environment-related challenges, which it regards as the ‘defining task’ of this generation;

H. whereas asylum and migration will remain high on the EU’s agenda; whereas solidarity measures, such as relocation programmes, resettlement, or humanitarian admission, are crucial pending meaningful reform of the Common European Asylum System; whereas Member States will continue to need financial support for the reception and registration of persons in need of international protection, the processing of asylum applications and the dignified return of persons without a right to stay;

I. whereas well-managed legal migration is important to ensure an adequate response to the evolving labour market; whereas funding is needed for the proper integration of asylum seekers.

J.  whereas Turkey continues to host the largest refugee population in the world and discussions are currently ongoing on how the EU should continue its support to Turkey after the end of its commitments made under the EU Facility for Refugees in Turkey;

K. whereas the effective protection of the EU’s external borders is a precondition for the proper functioning of the Schengen area and free movement within the EU; whereas effective protection of the external borders must comply with Union and international law, respecting, in particular, the right to asylum and the principle of non-refoulement; whereas the establishment of a fully-fledged European Border and Coast Guard system will increase the shared responsibilities between Member States and the Union for the external borders, while Member States retain the primary responsibility for the management of their external borders;

L. whereas the highly complex and ever-evolving nature of threats to the EU’s security,  requires a comprehensive and coordinated approach which links the external and internal dimensions and invests in capacity building and enhanced cooperation to improves the capability of the EU and its Member States to prevent and address those threats in an effective and efficient manner;

M. whereas the future Citizens, Equality, Rights and Values programme was partially agreed with the Council and included in the Parliament first reading position; whereas this programme is of strategic importance to strengthen European citizenship, and thus funding must be commensurate; whereas it includes a new strand on Union values that would provide financial support to civil society organisations active at local, regional and transnational level in promoting rights, thereby also strengthening the protection and promotion of Union values and the respect of the rule of law and contributing to democratic dialogue, transparency and good governance, including in cases of shrinking space for civil society;

Budget 2021: make the Green Deal a success...

1. Insists that the EU budget is vital to respond to the challenges the Union is facing and reflects the degree of ambition of the Member States and the institutions;

2. Deplores the lack of attention given to the call by IPCC scientists, in their latest report, for radical action to catch up with the ecological transition, in the light of their warning that CO2 concentration increased three times faster in 2018-2019 than in the 1960s; underlines the fact that there are only a few years left to prevent climate change from getting irreversibly out of control;

3. Notes that reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 55 % by 2030 represents an enormous challenge, notably with regard to building insulation, developing public transport and achieving both an agricultural transition and a socially just transition; insists that in order to succeed in this unprecedented enterprise in only ten years, urgent action is needed, backed by a strong EU budget as of 2021;

...and protect EU citizens from the next financial crisis

4. Is concerned about the risk of a new financial crisis, as highlighted by international financial institutions, in the light of rising global public and private debt (322 % of the world’s GDP); is worried about the potential social and political consequences of such a crisis – projected by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) to be ten times harsher than in the aftermath of 2008 – if the EU is not equipped with new tools to protect social cohesion;

A budget commensurate with the challenges

5. Welcomes the Commission’s proposals for the European Green Deal and the Sustainable Europe Investment Plan, notably the Just Transition Fund; stresses that these are deeply linked to the negotiations on the next MFF and therefore imply a strong and credible MFF; stresses that financing for any new initiatives should be calculated in addition to the Commission’s original proposal and thus result in higher MFF ceilings;

6. Notes, however, that in order to attain the 40 % GHG emissions reduction target by 2030, the Commission has estimated that it will be necessary to bridge a funding gap of at least EUR 500 billion every year, including social adaptation measures; considers that this funding gap is strongly underestimated even for the 40 % target, not to mention the 55 % target, and is yet to be addressed at EU or national level; stresses the urgent need for another quantum leap in political and financial efforts in order to achieve these objectives; believes that introducing genuine new own resources is key to bridging this gap; considers that a just transition requires just funding;

7. Considers, therefore, that the whole 2021 budget must comply with the 55 % GHG emissions reduction target, as requested in its resolution of 15 January 2020 on the European Green Deal, and with the social commitments made by the President of the Commission, in order to send the right signals to EU citizens and businesses;

8. Reiterates that Parliament’s mandate for the MFF was set in its interim report of 14 November 2018 on ceilings, programme allocations, own resources and flexibility provisions, the mid-term revision and horizontal principles, such as mainstreaming the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and climate and gender equality;

9. Reiterates its position that commitment appropriations for the 2021-2027 period should be set at EUR 1 324.1 billion in 2018 prices, which represents 1.3 % of the EU-27’s gross national income (GNI); reflecting this position, is determined to defend a 2021 budget of EUR 192.1 billion in current prices in commitment appropriations (1.29 % of GNI);

10. Notes that this position implies, in million euros in 2021, 18.179 for Horizon Europe, 4.613 for Erasmus+, 2.132 for the InvestEU Fund, 883 for the Single Market Programme, 15.645 for the European Social Fund+, 4.256 for the Connecting Europe Facility, 11.716 for the Neighbourhood, Development and International Cooperation Instrument (NDICI), 937 for LIFE, 923 for the Asylum and Migration Fund, 676 for the instrument for financial support for border management and visa under the Border Management Fund (BMVI), 228 for the Internal Security Fund (ISF), and 247 for the Citizens, Equality, Rights and Values programme;

11. Aims to set binding biodiversity and climate mainstreaming targets and to fix the latter to at least 30 % for 2021; reiterates its call on the Commission to lay down clear eligibility criteria of a stringent and comprehensive methodology for defining and tracking relevant climate and biodiversity expenditure;

A sufficient and realistic level of payments

12. Is determined to avoid a new payment crisis; reiterates that the overall payment ceiling must take into account the unprecedented volume of outstanding commitments at the end of 2020 to be settled under the next MFF; further notes that the focus of payment appropriations in 2021 will largely be on completion of 2014-2020 programmes; insists, however, that this should not hinder the launch of new programmes;

13. Insists, therefore, on setting payments at an appropriate level as of 2021 in order to obviate any difficulties for beneficiaries and reiterates its commitment to defend a level of payments at EUR 184.7 billion in current prices for 2021;

MFF contingency plan

14. Reiterates its demand for a contingency plan to protect beneficiaries and ensure continuity of funding in the event that the current MFF needs to be extended beyond 2020; demands that the Commission present such a plan without delay, including the prolongation of the legal bases where relevant;

15. Notes that the extension of the current MFF ceilings would result in EUR 172.2 billion in commitment appropriations in 2021, which represents 1.15 % of the EU’s GNI according to the Commission’s 2018 estimate; notes, furthermore, that an additional EUR 3.5 billion would become available under flexibility instruments at the beginning of 2021;

Protect EU external borders, provide international protection and manage migration flows, ensure internal security

16. Calls for a coherent and consistent approach of the European Council and the European Union Presidency to the financing of all sectoral programmes in the justice and home affairs (JHA) area under the next MFF as well as all Justice and Home Affairs agencies and bodies including the EDPS so that adequate resources are available to secure the timely implementation of all commitments taken in European legislation in this policy area;

17. Stresses the need to provide adequate funding for the European Border and Coast Guard Agency to enable it to rapidly achieve its full standing corps of 10,000 border guards and staff, and to acquire the necessary equipment to enable it to provide efficient and meaningful support to the Member States; emphasises that appropriate funding should also be provided to the Border Management and Visa Instrument, under which Member States  are helped to ensure the efficient management of the Union’s external borders;

18. Calls for increased financial resources to be allocated to Member States specifically for the purpose of ensuring adequate reception and registration of asylum seekers, the processing of asylum applications and the dignified return of persons without a right to stay with a clear preference for voluntary returns;

19. Stresses that immediate solidarity measures, notably a relocation programme, should be introduced pending meaningful reform of the EU’s asylum rules; requests furthermore that funding remains foreseen in the EU budget for the support of refugees in Turkey;

20. Highlights the importance of providing adequate funding to Member States to support them in their efforts to enhance cross-border cooperation and capacity-building in the fight against transnational serious and organised crime, terrorism, including hybrid threats, as well as radicalisation leading to violent extremism; reiterates the important role of Europol and Eurojust in supporting Member States in this regard; underlines moreover the additional workload of eu-LISA linked to the development of the new EU databases and the implementation of interoperability; calls for sufficient funding and staff to be made available to these agencies to enable them to fulfil their mandates;

21. Welcomes that the European Public Prosecutor’s Office (EPPO) has been established, and that the Chief Prosecutor has taken up her duties, ; recalls that due to the highly sensitive nature of its work, the EPPO has special requirements including a fully independent and highly secured data centre as well as security protection services both for the Chief Prosecutor and the physical buildings; insists that these requirements are matched with adequate funding;

22. Insists that an increase of the budget of all other decentralised JHA agencies and the EDPS would be needed in 2021 for them to fully fulfil their mandates, thereby reinforcing the application of EU law and operational cooperation at Union level;

Promotion of the rule of law

23. Calls for sufficient funding to be provided as a priority to support the activity of civil society organisations and other stakeholders active in promoting rights and strengthening and promoting Union values and the rule of law, including via the future Citizens, Equality, Rights and Values programme, in times when a shrinking space for civil society is witnessed in several Member States;

 


 

 

 

LETTER OF THE COMMITTEE ON CONSTITUTIONAL AFFAIRS

Mr Johan Van Overtveldt

Chair

Committee on Budgets

BRUSSELS

Subject: <Titre>Opinion on Guidelines for the 2021 Budget - Section III</Titre> <DocRef>(2019/2213(BUD))</DocRef>

Dear Mr Chair,

Under the procedure referred to above, the Committee on Constitutional Affairs has been asked to submit an opinion to your committee. Since our committee was not in a position to adopt a regular opinion, due to the COVID-19 outbreak, I transmit hereby the priorities expressed by Members of our committee, resulting from the draft opinion and amendments tabled. This text has been agreed among coordinators by written procedure.

 

First of all, members of the committee wish to recall the importance of a reform of the procedures for adopting the Multiannual Financial Framework and the system of own resources of the Union so as to overcome recurrent deadlocks in the negotiations on the Union’s budget. The Union’s budget should be sufficient to finance the exercise of the competences attributed to the Union by the Treaties, which have grown over time. This requires also the rapid introduction of new genuine own resources as foreseen in article 311 TFEU in order to constitute a solid Union's budget focused on the common European interest, able to tackle the challenges of our time and to deliver the results that matter to European citizens.

 

Effective communication with and consultation of citizens all over Europe should be among the top priorities for the budget in order to ensure broad, active and effective involvement of citizens.

In particular the budget for 2021 should have the resources necessary for the roll out of the Conference on the Future of Europe. These resources should be commensurate with the Conference goals as set out in the European Parliament’s position on the Conference on the Future of Europe[27], including the organization of thematic European Citizens’ agoras and Youth agoras throughout the process.

 

Members of the committee underline the need for adequate financing of Union’s programmes, activities and initiatives that are vital for intensifying the participatory democracy processes in the EU, building citizens’ trust and enhancing their understanding of EU policies and aim at developing and promoting European Citizenship, in particular the Europe for Citizens Programme, the Rights, Equality and Citizenship Programme, the European Citizens’ Initiative, as well as Erasmus Plus, the European Solidarity Corps and the development of a curriculum on EU Citizenship education. Proper levels of financing need to be secured also to enable the activities of EU institutions and bodies, such as the Commission Representations or the East StratCom Task Force, to counter disinformation and foreign interferences. Furthermore the Joint Transparency Register Secretariat should have sufficient and adequate administrative and financial means in order to fulfil its tasks.

 

Finally, members would like to recall that according to the Treaties, and in order to preserve mutual trust between them, Members and former Members of the European Union are bound to honour their budgetary obligations in full.

 

I am confident that the Committee on Budgets will take these suggestions into consideration when preparing the guidelines for the 2021 budget.

 

Yours sincerely,

Antonio Tajani

 

 


 

 

 

LETTER OF THE COMMITTEE ON WOMEN'S RIGHTS AND GENDER EQUALITY

Mr Johan Van Overtveldt

Chair

Committee on Budgets

BRUSSELS

Subject: <Titre>Opinion on Guidelines for the 2021 Budget - Section III</Titre> <DocRef>(2019/2213(BUD))</DocRef>

Dear Mr Van Overtveldt,

Under the procedure referred to above, the Committee on Women's Rights and Gender Equality has been asked to submit an opinion to your committee. In a written procedure of the Coordinators of 31 March 2020, the committee decided to send the opinion in the form of a letter.

During that procedure, the Committee on Women's Rights and Gender Equality decided to call on the Committee on Budgets, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions into its motion for a resolution.

Yours sincerely,

Evelyn Regner

 

 

SUGGESTIONS

A. whereas Article 8 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union states that ‘in all its activities, the Union shall aim to eliminate inequalities and promote equality between men and women, thus establishing the principle of gender mainstreaming which stipulates that gender equality must be incorporated into all EU policies and addressed at all levels of the budgetary process via gender mainstreaming and gender budgeting;

B. whereas discrimination needs to be eradicated and effectively addressed by the Member States and the EU and whereas an increasing percentage of the EU budget, including the EU Structural Funds and investment in high-quality public care services, must be designed to create new opportunities in the EU labour market, to promote social rights and to improve working and living conditions in order to facilitate a better work-life balance for both sexes with a specific focus on improving equality including for women and girls and LGBTI+  persons;

C. whereas women remain under-represented in leadership and decision making positions, while being overrepresented in low-paid sectors such as care and service work, whereas they devote more time than men to unpaid housework and care responsibilities; whereas special measures are required to support women, namely women returning to the job market after a long break in order to increase their potential on the labour market;

D. whereas women remain under-represented in the digital economy, AI, ICT and STEM sectors in terms of education, training and employment, including management positions; whereas resources supporting women´s empowerment through digital inclusion could lead to advancing equality in the digital age; whereas the strategy ´A Europe Fit for the Digital Age´ should integrate gender mainstreaming;

E. whereas the Commission should ensure sufficient funding levels for programmes aimed at supporting women’s rights to at least their current level, such as the current Rights, Equality and Citizenship (REC) Programme and the future Rights and Values Programme, with a special focus on non-discrimination, gender equality and gender mainstreaming instruments and the prevention of gender-based violence; Stresses the position of the European Parliament in favour of a specific earmarking for actions preventing and combating all forms of gender-based violence and promoting the full implementation of the Istanbul Convention in the Rights and Values programme;

Putting equality at the core of EU policies

1. Stresses that gender budgeting must become an integral part of the budgetary procedure at all of its stages and in all budget lines, so that budgetary expenditure becomes an effective tool for promoting gender equality; calls for gender mainstreaming to be consistently implemented in all EU programmes, financial instruments and the European Fund for Strategic Investments (EFSI);

2. Reaffirms its request for more investment to uphold the rights of women and girls; calls for budgetary allocations to support women’s economic independence through EU programmes and funds, such as COSME, Horizon 2020 and the EFSI;

3. Calls for greater synergies between the instruments available to advance gender equality and improve work-life balance; reiterates the need for greater efforts to support women who are put in a more vulnerable situation, including women with disabilities, women of colour, single mothers and migrant women, women living in remote rural areas and ethnic minority and LBTI+ women;

4. Calls for spending on gender equality to be monitored with independent budget lines for targeted actions and for proper indicators, impact assessments and a dedicated methodology to be established, particularly as regards the fight against gender-based discrimination, psychological, sexual and physical violence, sexual harassment and women’s access to sexual and reproductive health and rights; calls for relevant accountability and transparency mechanisms, as well as regular and gender-sensitive reporting of the outcomes to be developed and applied in order to improve the process of gender mainstreaming and the efficiency of the programmes implemented;

5. Calls for the EU to increase the budget allocation for civil society organisations that promote women’s rights in Europe and the Global South;

6. Stresses the worrying and increasing backlash against gender equality and women’s rights and the importance of EU instruments including the NDICI to combat this situation; regrets that the Commission did not include a specific programme on gender equality in their proposal and calls for ambitious and specific budget allocations to support women human rights defenders and the protection and promotion of sexual and reproductive health and rights; therefore, stresses the need to reinforce budgetary allocations that support universal respect for and access to sexual and reproductive health and rights;

7. Recalls the important role played by the European Institute for Gender Equality (EIGE) in understanding the extent and causes of inequality between men and women in the EU, and the need for a consolidated budget for collecting gender-disaggregated data and acquiring expertise in the area of gender equality; calls for the  EIGE’s budget, staff establishment plan and independence to be increased or at least kept as a minimum at their current levels.

 

 


 

 

 


INFORMATION ON ADOPTION IN COMMITTEE RESPONSIBLE

Date adopted

28.5.2020

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

33

4

1

Members present for the final vote

Rasmus Andresen, Clotilde Armand, Robert Biedroń, Anna Bonfrisco, Olivier Chastel, Lefteris Christoforou, David Cormand, Paolo De Castro, José Manuel Fernandes, Eider Gardiazabal Rubial, Alexandra Geese, Valentino Grant, Elisabetta Gualmini, Francisco Guerreiro, Valerie Hayer, Eero Heinäluoma, Niclas Herbst, Monika Hohlmeier, Moritz Körner, Joachim Kuhs, Ioannis Lagos, Hélène Laporte, Pierre Larrouturou, Janusz Lewandowski, Margarida Marques, Siegfried Mureşan, Victor Negrescu, Andrey Novakov, Jan Olbrycht, Dimitrios Papadimoulis, Karlo Ressler, Bogdan Rzońca, Nils Torvalds, Nils Ušakovs, Rainer Wieland, Angelika Winzig

Substitutes present for the final vote

Fabienne Keller, Petros Kokkalis

 


FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE RESPONSIBLE

33

+

GUE/NGL

Petros Kokkalis, Dimitrios Papadimoulis

PPE

Lefteris Christoforou, José Manuel Fernandes, Niclas Herbst, Monika Hohlmeier, Janusz Lewandowski, Siegfried Mureşan, Andrey Novakov, Jan Olbrycht, Karlo Ressler, Rainer Wieland Angelika Winzig

RENEW

Clotilde Armand, Olivier Chastel, Valerie Hayer, Fabienne Keller, Moritz Körner, Nils Torvalds

S&D

Robert Biedroń, Paolo De Castro, Eider Gardiazabal Rubial, Elisabetta Gualmini, Eero Heinäluoma, Pierre Larrouturou, Margarida Marques, Victor Negrescu, Nils Ušakovs

VERTS/ALE

Rasmus Andresen, David Cormand, Alexandra Geese, Francisco Guerreiro

NI

Ioannis Lagos

 

4

-

ID

Anna Bonfrisco, Valentino Grant, Joachim Kuhs, Hélène Laporte

 

1

0

ECR

Bogdan Rzońca

 

 

 

Key to symbols:

+ : in favour

- : against

0 : abstention

 

 

[2] OJ L 193, 30.7.2018, p. 1.

[3] OJ L 347, 20.12.2013, p. 884.

[4] OJ C 373, 20.12.2013, p. 1.

[5] OJ L 168, 7.6.2014, p. 105.

[6] OJ L xx, ….

[7] Texts adopted, P8_TA(2018)0449.

[8] Texts adopted, P9_TA(2019)0032.

[9] Texts adopted, P9_TA(2020)0054.

[10] Texts adopted, P9_TA(2020)0065.

[11] Texts adopted, P9_TA(2020)0124.

[12] Texts adopted, P9_TA(2020)0015.

[13] OJ C 242, 10.7.2018, p. 24.

[14] Texts adopted, P9_TA(2020)0005.

[[1]][1] With a special focus on Article 100 of the EGD Resolution (Texts adopted P9_TA(2020)0005): https://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/document/TA-9-2020-0005_EN.pdf

‘100. Welcomes the concept of the ‘do no harm’ principle and the commitment by the Commission to ensure that all EU actions should help the EU achieve a sustainable future and a just transition, including the use of green budgeting tools, and to update the better regulation guidelines accordingly; insists on a coherent approach to the implementation of the Paris Agreement, the Convention on Biological Diversity and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, in both internal and external policies; urges the Commission to assist the Member States in the full and correct implementation of current and upcoming environmental and climate legislation in the Member States and to ensure that there are consequences in cases of non-compliance.’

As well as Article 54 of the COP25 Resolution (Texts adopted P9_TA(2019)0079): https://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/document/TA-9-2019-0079_EN.pdf

‘54. Stresses that the EU’s budget should be consistent with its international commitments on sustainable development and its mid- and long-term climate and energy targets, and should not be counterproductive to these targets or hamper their implementation; calls on the Commission, therefore, to ensure climate and biodiversity proofing of EU investments and to put forward harmonised and binding rules where applicable; calls on the Commission to ensure that the next multiannual financial framework (MFF) is fully compliant with the Paris Agreement and that no spending should contravene it.’

[15] European Parliament resolution of 14 November 2018 on the Multiannual Financial Framework 2021-2027 – Parliament’s position with a view to an agreement (COM(2018)0322 – C8-0000/2018 – 2018/0166R(APP))

[19] OJ L 193, 30.7.2018, p. 1.

[20] OJ L 347, 20.12.2013, p. 884.

[21] OJ C 373, 20.12.2013, p. 1.

[22] OJ L 168, 7.6.2014, p. 105.

[23] OJ L xx, ….

[24] Texts adopted, P8_TA(2018)0449.

[25] Texts adopted, P9_TA(2019)0032.

[26] Texts adopted, P9_TA(2020)0005.

[27] Texts adopted, P9_TA(2020)0010 

An nuashonrú is déanaí: 5 Meitheamh 2020Fógra dlíthiúil - Beartas príobháideachais