Procedure : 2020/0030(NLE)
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Document selected : A9-0124/2020

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A9-0124/2020

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Texts adopted :

P9_TA(2020)0194

<Date>{25/06/2020}25.6.2020</Date>
<NoDocSe>A9-0124/2020</NoDocSe>
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<TitreType>REPORT</TitreType>     <RefProcLect>*</RefProcLect>

<Titre>on the proposal for a Council decision on guidelines for the employment policies of the Member States</Titre>

<DocRef>(COM(2020)0070 – C9‑0079/2020 – 2020/0030(NLE))</DocRef>


<Commission>{EMPL}Committee on Employment and Social Affairs</Commission>

Rapporteur: <Depute>José Gusmão</Depute>

AMENDMENTS
DRAFT EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT LEGISLATIVE RESOLUTION
 PROCEDURE – COMMITTEE RESPONSIBLE
 FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE RESPONSIBLE

DRAFT EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT LEGISLATIVE RESOLUTION

on the proposal for a Council decision on guidelines for the employment policies of the Member States

(COM(2020)0070 – C9‑0079/2020 – 2020/0030(NLE))

(Consultation)

The European Parliament,

 having regard to the Commission proposal to the Council (COM(2020)0070),

 having regard to Article 148(2) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, pursuant to which the Council consulted Parliament (C9‑0079/2020),

 having regard to Rule 82 of its Rules of Procedure,

 having regard to the report of the Committee on Employment and Social Affairs (A9-0124/2020),

1. Approves the Commission proposal as amended;

2. Calls on the Commission to alter its proposal accordingly, in accordance with Article 293(2) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union;

3. Calls on the Council to notify Parliament if it intends to depart from the text approved by Parliament;

4. Asks the Council to consult Parliament again if it intends to substantially amend the Commission proposal;

5. Instructs its President to forward its position to the Council and the Commission.

 

<RepeatBlock-Amend><Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>1</NumAm>

 

<DocAmend>Proposal for a decision</DocAmend>

<Article>Recital 1</Article>

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(1) Member States and the Union are to work towards developing a coordinated strategy for employment and particularly for promoting a skilled, trained and adaptable workforce, as well as labour markets that are responsive to economic change, with a view to achieving the objectives of full employment and social progress, balanced growth and a high level of protection and improvement of the quality of the environment set out in Article 3 of the Treaty on European Union. Member States shall regard promoting employment as a matter of common concern and shall coordinate their action in this respect within the Council, taking into account national practices related to the responsibilities of management and labour.

(1) Member States and the Union are to develop and implement an effective and coordinated strategy for employment and particularly for promoting a skilled, trained workforce, as well as labour markets that are dynamic, future-oriented and responsive to economic change, with a view to achieving the objectives of full employment and social progress, inclusiveness, economic, social and territorial cohesion, and a high level of protection and improvement of the quality of the environment. Member States shall regard promoting quality employment based on equal opportunities and social justice as a matter of common concern and shall coordinate their action in this respect within the Council, respecting national practices and the autonomy of the social partners. The current situation caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, which will have a serious and long-lasting impact on Union labour markets, social justice and working conditions, calls for unprecedented level of action in order to support employment, stimulate the economy, and strengthen the industrial fabric. Decisive action is necessary to protect undertakings and workers against immediate employment and income losses, and to help contain the economic and social shock of the crisis and to prevent massive job losses and a deep recession.

</Amend>

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>2</NumAm>

 

<DocAmend>Proposal for a decision</DocAmend>

<Article>Recital 2</Article>

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(2) The Union is to combat social exclusion and discrimination and promote social justice and protection, as well as equality between women and men, solidarity between generations and the protection of the rights of the child. In defining and implementing its policies and activities, the Union is to take into account requirements linked to the promotion of a high level of employment, the guarantee of adequate social protection, the fight against poverty and social exclusion and a high level of education and training as set out in Article 9 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union.

(2) In order to fully achieve its founding principles - social cohesion and peace -, to an even greater extent in a moment of deep crisis where those principles are challenged, the Union should have at the top of its political priorities the fight against poverty, social exclusion and discrimination and should promote social justice and protection, as well as equality between women and men, solidarity between generations, the inclusion of persons with disabilities, and the protection of the rights of the child and other highly disadvantaged groups. In defining and implementing its policies and activities, the Union is to take into account requirements linked to the promotion of the protection of human health, inclusive quality labour markets and full employment, the existence of accessible and affordable quality public services, decent salaries, decent standards of living and social protection for all, as well as a high level of education and training throughout people’s lives as set out in Article 9 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU).

</Amend>

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>3</NumAm>

 

<DocAmend>Proposal for a decision</DocAmend>

<Article>Recital 3</Article>

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(3) In accordance with the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU), the Union has developed and implemented policy coordination instruments for economic and employment policies. As part of these instruments, the present Guidelines for the Employment Policies of the Member States, together with the Broad Guidelines for the Economic Policies of the Member States and of the Union set out in Council Recommendation (EU) 2015/1184 (5 ), form the Integrated Guidelines. They are to guide policy implementation in the Member States and in the Union, reflecting the interdependence between the Member States. The resulting set of coordinated European and national policies and reforms are to constitute an appropriate overall sustainable economic and employment policy mix, which should achieve positive spill-over effects.

(3) In accordance with the TFEU the Union has developed and implemented policy coordination instruments for economic and employment policies. As part of these instruments, the present Guidelines for the Employment Policies of the Member States, together with the Broad Guidelines for the Economic Policies of the Member States and of the Union set out in Council Recommendation (EU) 2015/1184(5 ), form the Integrated Guidelines. They must support the the European Green Deal, the European Pillar of Social Rights (Pillar), the revised European Social Charter, the Paris Agreement and United Nations Sustainable Development Goals and guide policy implementation in the Member States and in the Union, reflecting the interdependence between the Member States. The resulting set of coordinated European and national policies and reforms are to constitute an appropriate overall sustainable economic and employment policy mix, which should achieve positive spill-over effects, while reversing the decline in collective bargaining coverage.

__________________

__________________

5 Council Recommendation (EU) 2015/1184 of 14 July 2015 on broad guidelines for the economic policies of the Member States and of the European Union (OJ L 192, 18.7.2015, p. 27).

5 Council Recommendation (EU) 2015/1184 of 14 July 2015 on broad guidelines for the economic policies of the Member States and of the European Union (OJ L 192, 18.7.2015, p. 27).

</Amend>

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>4</NumAm>

 

<DocAmend>Proposal for a decision</DocAmend>

<Article>Recital 4</Article>

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(4) The Guidelines for the Employment Policies are consistent with the Stability and Growth Pact, the existing Union legislation and various Union initiatives, including the Council recommendation of 22 April 2013 on establishing a Youth Guarantee (6 ), the Council Recommendation of 15 February 2016 on the integration of the long-term unemployed into the labour market (7 ), the Council Recommendation of 19 December 2016 on Upskilling Pathways (8 ), the Council Recommendation of 15 March 2018 on a European Framework for Quality and Effective Apprenticeships (9 ), the Council Recommendation of 22 May 2018 on Key Competences and Lifelong Learning (10 ), the Council Recommendation of 22 May 2019 on High Quality Early Childhood Education and Care Systems (11 ) and the Council Recommendation of 8 November 2019 on Access to Social Protection (12 ).

(4) The Guidelines for the Employment Policies are consistent with the existing Union legislation and various Union initiatives, including the Council recommendation of 22 April 2013 on establishing a Youth Guarantee (6 ), the Council Recommendation of 15 February 2016 on the integration of the long-term unemployed into the labour market (7 ), the Council Recommendation of 19 December 2016 on Upskilling Pathways: New Opportunities for Adults (8 ), the Council Recommendation of 15 March 2018 on a European Framework for Quality and Effective Apprenticeships (9 ), the Council Recommendation of 22 May 2018 on key competences for lifelong learning (10 ), the Council Recommendation of 22 May 2019 on High-Quality Early Childhood Education and Care Systems (11 ) and the Council Recommendation of 8 November 2019 on access to social protection for workers and the self-employed (12 ). Following the Council decision of 23 March 2020 to activate the so-called ‘General escape clause’, Member States can exercise fiscal flexibility to promote and protect quality jobs and working conditions and to finance public health and social services. The duration of the application of the ‘General escape clause’ has to reflect the dimension and duration of the COVID-19 crisis. On the basis of the Commission’s public consultation it should be examined which possible directions the development of Union fiscal rules could take.

__________________

__________________

6 OJ C 120, 26.4.2013, p. 1.

6 OJ C 120, 26.4.2013, p. 1.

7 OJ C 67, 20.2.2016, p. 1.

7 OJ C 67, 20.2.2016, p. 1.

8 OJ C 484, 24.12.2016, p. 1.

8 OJ C 484, 24.12.2016, p. 1.

9 OJ C 153, 2.5.2018, p. 1.

9 OJ C 153, 2.5.2018, p. 1.

10 OJ C 189, 4.6.2018, p. 1–13

10 OJ C 189, 4.6.2018, p. 1–13

11 OJ C 189, 5.6.2019, p. 4–14

11 OJ C 189, 5.6.2019, p. 4–14

12 OJ C 387, 15.11.2019, p. 1–8

12 OJ C 387, 15.11.2019, p. 1–8

</Amend>

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>5</NumAm>

 

<DocAmend>Proposal for a decision</DocAmend>

<Article>Recital 5</Article>

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(5) The European Semester combines the different instruments in an overarching framework for integrated multilateral coordination and surveillance of economic and employment policies. While pursuing environmental sustainability, productivity, fairness and stability, the European Semester integrates the principles of the European Pillar of Social Rights, including strong engagement with social partners, civil society and other stakeholders. It supports the delivery of the Sustainable Development Goals (13 ). The Union and Member States’ employment and economic policies should go hand in hand with Europe’s transition to a climate neutral, environmentally sustainable and digital economy, while improving competitiveness, fostering innovation, promoting social justice and equal opportunities as well as tackling inequalities and regional disparities.

(5) The European Semester combines the different instruments in an overarching framework for integrated multilateral coordination and surveillance of economic, employment, social and environmental policies. The European Semester needs to put sustainability, social inclusion and people’s wellbeing at the heart of the Union’s economic policy-making, ensuring that social, environmental and economic objectives have equal priority. While pursuing environmental sustainability, productivity, fairness and stability, the European Semester should further integrate the principles of the Pillar, including stronger engagement with the social partners, civil society and other stakeholders and support the delivery of the Sustainable Development Goals (13 ), including gender equality. The gender equality index could serve as one of the Semester’s tool for monitoring progress towards employment and social targets and to measure the gender effects of employment and social policies. The Union and Member States’ employment and economic policies should go hand in hand with Europe’s response to the crisis, and should also, in view of the particularly serious effects of this crisis on certain European industrial and business sectors, support the transition to a climate neutral, environmentally sustainable, socially inclusive and digital economy, ensuring upward social convergence while improving competitiveness, supporting SMEs, fostering innovation, promoting social justice and equal opportunities and investing in youth, as well as tackling inequalities and regional disparities.

__________________

__________________

13 UN Resolution A/RES/70/1

13 UN Resolution A/RES/70/1

</Amend>

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>6</NumAm>

 

<DocAmend>Proposal for a decision</DocAmend>

<Article>Recital 6</Article>

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(6) Climate change and environmental related challenges, globalisation, digitalisation and demographic change will transform European economies and societies. The Union and its Member States should work together to effectively address these structural factors and adapt existing systems as needed, recognising the close interdependence of the Member States' economies and labour markets and related policies. This requires a coordinated, ambitious and effective policy action at both Union and national levels, in accordance with the TFEU and the Union’s provisions on economic governance. Such policy action should encompass a boost in sustainable investment, a renewed commitment to appropriately sequenced structural reforms that improve productivity, economic growth, social and territorial cohesion, upward convergence, resilience and the exercise of fiscal responsibility. It should combine supply- and demand side measures, while taking into account their environmental, employment and social impact.

(6) Climate change and environmental related challenges, globalisation, digitalisation and demographic change are deeply transforming European economies and societies. The Union and its Member States should work together to respond to this unprecedented situation by embedding social rights and working towards a reduction of poverty and inequality and adapt existing systems to strengthen resilience and sustainability, recognising the close interdependence of the Member States' economies and labour markets, social and environmental policies. This requires a coordinated, ambitious and effective policy action at both Union and national levels. Such policy action should encompass a boost in social and environmental investment, efficient long-term measures needed to mitigate the impact of the crisis, and financial assistance to businesses, non-profit and charitable organisations, as well as households, in particular those at risk of poverty and social exclusion. It should combine supply and demand side measures, paying due attention also to the labour market demand and supply needs, and involving the use of new technologies, while taking into account their environmental, employment and social impact. Member States and the Union should adopt long-term instruments in this regard and the work of the Commission on a European permanent unemployment reinsurance scheme is welcome.

</Amend>

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>7</NumAm>

 

<DocAmend>Proposal for a decision</DocAmend>

<Article>Recital 7</Article>

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(7) The European Parliament, the Council and the Commission signed an inter-institutional proclamation for a European Pillar of Social Rights (14 ). The Pillar sets out twenty principles and rights to support well-functioning and fair labour markets and welfare systems, structured around three categories: equal opportunities and access to the labour market, fair working conditions and social protection and inclusion. The principles and rights give direction to our strategy making sure that the transitions to climate-neutrality and environmental sustainability, digitalisation and demographic change are socially fair and just. The Pillar constitutes a reference framework to monitor the employment and social performance of Member States, to drive reforms at national, regional and local level and to reconcile the “social” and the “market” in today’s modern economy, including by promoting the social economy.

(7) The European Parliament, the Council and the Commission signed an Inter-institutional Proclamation on the Pillar (14 ). The Pillar sets out twenty principles and rights to support well-functioning and fair labour markets and welfare systems, structured around three categories: equal opportunities and access to the labour market, fair working conditions and social protection and inclusion. The principles and rights give direction to our strategy and must be acted upon so as to make sure that the transition to climate-neutrality and environmental sustainability; digitalisation and a new demographic equilibrium are socially fair and just. Considering that the Pillar and its principles constitute a reference framework to monitor the employment and social performance of Member States, the Employment Guidelines can be an important tool for Member States in developing and implementing policies and measures for a more resilient and inclusive society and economy whilst promoting labour rights and pursuing the objective of upward convergence, in order to further develop the European Social model.

__________________

__________________

14 OJ C 428, 13.12.2017, p. 10.

14 OJ C 428, 13.12.2017, p. 10.

</Amend>

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>8</NumAm>

 

<DocAmend>Proposal for a decision</DocAmend>

<Article>Recital 8</Article>

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(8) Reforms to the labour market, including the national wage-setting mechanisms, should follow national practices of social dialogue and allow the necessary opportunity for a broad consideration of socioeconomic issues, including improvements in sustainability, competitiveness, innovation, job creation, lifelong learning and training policies, working conditions, education and skills, public health and inclusion and real incomes.

(8) With due respect to the principle of subsidiarity as defined in the TFEU reforms to the labour market, including the national wage-setting mechanisms, should promote a swift recovery and allow the necessary opportunity for a broad consideration of socioeconomic issues, including improvements in sustainability, competitiveness, growth, innovation, creation of quality employment, inclusion of persons with disabilities and otherwise disadvantaged groups, lifelong learning and training policies, working conditions, education and skills, public health and inclusion and real incomes. Member States should therefore respect and strengthen the social partners and extend collective bargaining coverage, and take measures to promote high trade union and employers’ organisation density in order to ensure a democratic, inclusive and socially just recovery.

</Amend>

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>9</NumAm>

 

<DocAmend>Proposal for a decision</DocAmend>

<Article>Recital 9</Article>

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(9) Member States and the Union should ensure that the transformations are fair and socially just, strengthening the drive towards an inclusive and resilient society in which people are protected and empowered to anticipate and manage change, and in which they can actively participate in society and the economy. Discrimination in all its forms should be tackled. Access and opportunities for all should be ensured and poverty and social exclusion (including that of children) should be reduced, in particular by ensuring an effective functioning of labour markets and of social protection systems and by removing barriers to education, training and labour-market participation, including through investments in early childhood education and care. Timely and equal access to affordable healthcare services, including prevention and health promotion are particularly relevant in a context of ageing societies. The potential of people with disabilities to contribute to economic growth and social development should be further realised. As new economic and business models take hold in Union workplaces, employment relationships are also changing. Member States should ensure that employment relationships stemming from new forms of work maintain and strengthen Europe’s social model.

(9) Particularly at a moment when, both at economic and social levels, immense changes challenge the Union, Member States should ensure that those changes are fair, and socially just, strengthening the drive towards a more inclusive and resilient society in which people are protected and empowered to anticipate and manage change, and in which they can fully participate in society and the economy. Discrimination in all its forms should be eliminated. Everyone should be given the ability to contribute fully in society. Equal opportunities for all should be ensured and poverty, discrimination and social exclusion (including that of children, persons with disabilities and other disadvantaged groups) should be eradicated. To that end the Union should implement measures such as the European Child Guarantee. The potential of persons with disabilities to contribute to economic and social development should be fully realised. As new economic and business models take hold in Union workplaces, employment relationships are also changing. As the COVID-19 crisis highlights , many low skilled workers are indispensable for the basic functioning of the economy. Too often, they are low paid and work in precarious conditions. Member States should further strengthen Europe’s social model by ensuring that all workers have the same rights, decent working conditions, including health and safety at work and decent wages. Moreover, Member States should tackle all forms of precarious work and bogus self-employment, and ensure that employment relationships stemming from new forms of work are in line with Europe’s social model.

</Amend>

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>10</NumAm>

 

<DocAmend>Proposal for a decision</DocAmend>

<Article>Recital 10</Article>

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(10) The Integrated Guidelines should form the basis for country-specific recommendations that the Council may address to the Member States. Member States should make full use of the European Social Fund Plus and other Union funds, including the Just Transition Fund and InvestEU, to foster employment, social investments, social inclusion, accessibility, promote up- and reskilling opportunities of the workforce, lifelong learning and high quality education and training for all, including digital literacy and skills. While the Integrated Guidelines are addressed to Member States and the Union, they should be implemented in partnership with all national, regional and local authorities, closely involving parliaments, as well as the social partners and representatives of civil society.

(10) The Integrated Guidelines should form the basis for country-specific recommendations that the Council may address to the Member States. Member States should make full use of the European Social Fund Plus, the European Structural and Investment Funds and other Union funds, including the Just Transition Fund and InvestEU, to foster quality employment and social investments, as well as fighting poverty and social exclusion, to foster accessibility, accompany the transition to a green, digital economy and promote upskilling and reskilling opportunities of the workforce, lifelong learning and high quality education and training for all, including digital literacy and skills. The use of those funds should also play a strong role in the reinforced investment on public services, particularly in the areas of education, health and housing. While the Integrated Guidelines are addressed to Member States and the Union and they should be implemented in partnership with all national, regional and local authorities, closely and actively involving, in their implementation, monitoring and evaluation, parliaments, as well as the social partners and representatives of civil society.

</Amend>

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>11</NumAm>

 

<DocAmend>Proposal for a decision</DocAmend>

<Article>Article 2 – paragraph 1 a (new)</Article>

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

The guidelines set out in the Annex shall be revised no later than one year after their adoption to take into account the COVID-19 crisis and its social and employment consequences, and to better respond to similar future crises. In order to strengthen democratic decision-making, the European Parliament shall be involved in defining the Integrated Guidelines for Growth and Jobs on an equal footing with the Council.

</Amend>

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>12</NumAm>

 

<DocAmend>Proposal for a decision</DocAmend>

<Article>Annex I – Guideline 5 – paragraph 1</Article>

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

Member States should actively promote a sustainable social market economy and facilitate and support investment in the creation of quality jobs. To this end, they should reduce the barriers that businesses face in hiring people, foster responsible entrepreneurship and genuine self-employment and, in particular, support the creation and growth of micro-, small- and medium-sized enterprises, including through access to finance. Member States should actively promote the development of the social economy, foster social innovation, social enterprises, and encourage those innovative forms of work, creating quality job opportunities and generating social benefits at local level.

Member States should actively promote full, quality employment based on a strong economy. Recognising that State investment plays a crucial role in job creation, Member States should lead a major public investment drive and smart and ambitious employment policies to create jobs. Member States should adapt their employment policies and coordinate, at Union level, the implementation of best practices with regard to temporary measures that protect all workers and labour markets. Such measures should include wage subsidies; income support and extension of unemployment benefit schemes; the extension of paid sick leave and carers’ leave and remote teleworking arrangements. Member States should support the transformation of European enterprises towards ensuring self-sufficiency, in particular in protective equipment and medical devices. Member States should step up their support to businesses that are struggling as a result of the crisis provided that those businesses retain all their staff. Member States should also consider suspending dismissals during the crisis period. Member States should ensure the involvement of the social partners in the planning and implementation of such measures. Those measures should be sustained over time until a full economic recovery has been reached, after which they should be phased out. Particular attention should be paid to guaranteeing the rights and jobs of mobile and frontier workers that have been hit hard by border closures. Member States should foster responsible entrepreneurship including among women and young people, and genuine self-employment and, in particular, support the creation and growth of micro, small and medium-sized enterprises, including through access to finance. Member States should actively promote the development of the circular and social economy, foster social innovation, social enterprises and strengthen their sustainability, and encourage those forms of work which create quality job opportunities and generate social benefits at local level, particularly in strategic sectors with strong potential for growth, such as the digital and green economy sectors. In that regard, policies supporting the creation of employment should also be implemented, in particular in public or private services of general interest, in particular childcare, healthcare and housing.

</Amend>

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>13</NumAm>

 

<DocAmend>Proposal for a decision</DocAmend>

<Article>Annex I – Guideline 5 – paragraph 2</Article>

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

The tax burden should be shifted away from labour to other sources more supportive to employment and inclusive growth and at the same time aligned with climate and environmental objectives, taking account of the redistributive effect of the tax system, while protecting revenue for adequate social protection and growth-enhancing expenditure.

Taxation should be shifted away from labour towards other sources where it will have a less detrimental effect on inclusive growth and at the same time ensure the full alignment with the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals and the climate and environmental objectives, as defined in the European Green Deal, increasing the redistributive impact of the tax system, while protecting revenue for adequate social protection and public investment.

</Amend>

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>14</NumAm>

 

<DocAmend>Proposal for a decision</DocAmend>

<Article>Annex I – Guideline 5 – paragraph 3</Article>

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

Member States having in place national mechanisms for the setting of statutory minimum wages should ensure an effective involvement of social partners in a transparent and predictable manner allowing for an adequate responsiveness of wages to productivity developments and providing fair wages for a decent standard of living, paying particular attention to lower and middle income groups with a view to upward convergence. These mechanisms should take into account economic performance across regions and sectors. Member States should promote social dialogue and collective bargaining with a view to wage setting. Respecting national practices, Member States and social partners should ensure that all workers are entitled to adequate and fair wages through collective agreements or adequate statutory minimum wages, taking into account their impact on competitiveness, job creation and in-work poverty.

Policies to ensure that fair wages allow a decent standard of living remain important to create employment and decrease poverty in the Union as do those to ensure the compatibility of paid work and entitlement to State allowances compensating for the barriers faced marginalised groups. Member States having in place national mechanisms of statutory minimum wages should ensure the effective involvement of social partners in the related wage setting procedure in a transparent and predictable manner. The development of minimum wages should take into account productivity developments to fight against precariousness and in-work poverty, paying particular attention to lower and middle-income groups with a view to upward convergence. These mechanisms should take into account poverty indicators specific to each Member State and economic performance across regions and sectors. Member States should strengthen social dialogue and take measures to extend collective bargaining coverage. Respecting national practices and the autonomy of the social partners, Member States and the social partners should eliminate wage discrimination on the ground of age or gender and ensure that all workers are entitled to adequate and fair wages through collective agreements or adequate statutory minimum wages, taking into account their positive impact on competitiveness, job creation and in-work poverty.

</Amend>

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>15</NumAm>

 

<DocAmend>Proposal for a decision</DocAmend>

<Article>Annex I – Guideline 5 – paragraph 3 a (new)</Article>

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

Member States will be able to call on the assistance of the Support to mitigate Unemployment Risks in an Emergency solidarity instrument (SURE). Member States should ensure that financial assistance in this regard is only provided to undertakings that respect the applicable collective agreements. Member States should ensure that recipient undertakings refrain from making share buy backs or paying dividends to shareholders and bonuses to executives, and that these undertakings are not registered in tax havens.

</Amend>

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>16</NumAm>

 

<DocAmend>Proposal for a decision</DocAmend>

<Article>Annex I – Guideline 6 – paragraph 1</Article>

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

In the context of technological and environmental transitions, as well as demographic change, Member States should promote sustainability, productivity, employability and human capital, fostering relevant knowledge, skills and competences throughout people's lives, responding to current and future labour market needs. Member States should also adapt and invest in their education and training systems to provide high quality and inclusive education, including vocational education and training. Member States should work together with the social partners, education and training providers, enterprises and other stakeholders to address structural weaknesses in education and training systems and improve their quality and labour market relevance, also with a view to enabling the environmental transition. Particular attention should be paid to challenges of the teaching profession. Education and training systems should equip all learners with key competences, including basic and digital skills as well as transversal competences to lay the foundations for adaptability later in life. Member States should seek to ensure the transfer of training entitlements during professional career changes, including, where appropriate, through individual learning accounts. They should enable everyone to anticipate and better adapt to labour market needs notably through continuous reskilling and upskilling, with a view to supporting fair and just transitions for all, strengthening social outcomes, addressing labour market shortages and improving the overall resilience of the economy to shocks.

In the context of the continuous technological and environmental transitions, the demographic change and the present challenges, Member States should promote social rights, sustainability, productivity, employability and human capabilities, fostering relevant knowledge, skills and competences throughout people's lives, responding to current unemployment crisis addressing present and future labour market needs. Member States’ needs of reskilling and upskilling their workforce in order to respond to the crisis should be reinforced by investment in their public education and training systems to provide high quality and inclusive education, including vocational and training and formal and informal lifelong learning. Member States should work together with the social partners, education and training providers, enterprises, social non-governmental organisations and other relevant stakeholders to address structural and new weaknesses in education and training systems and improve their quality and labour market relevance. Member States should address the needs of sectors with a chronic skills shortage, also with a view to enabling the simultaneous environmental transition as well as technological and digital changes which go towards solutions based on artificial intelligence. Particular attention should be paid to challenges of the teaching profession. Education and training systems should equip all learners with key competences, including basic and digital skills as well as transversal competences to lay the foundations for adaptability later in life and should prepare the teachers for being able to provide these competencies to their learners. Member States should seek to ensure the transfer of training entitlements during professional career changes, including through individual learning accounts. They should guarantee at the same time that this approach does not put in jeopardy the humanistic nature of education as well as the aspirations of individuals. It is crucial that Member States undertake early action to avoid the negative effect for individuals and societies of being outside the labour market needs notably through continuous reskilling and upskilling, with a view to supporting fair and just transitions for all, with a sufficient coverage and level of unemployment benefits, strengthen social outcomes, addressing labour market shortages and improving the overall resilience of the economy to shocks.

</Amend>

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>17</NumAm>

 

<DocAmend>Proposal for a decision</DocAmend>

<Article>Annex I – Guideline 6 – paragraph 2</Article>

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

Member States should foster equal opportunities for all by addressing inequalities in education and training systems, including by providing access to good quality early childhood education. They should raise overall education levels, reduce the number of young people leaving school early, increase access to and completion of tertiary education and increase adult participation in continuing learning, particularly among learners from disadvantaged backgrounds, the least qualified. Taking into account new requirements in digital, green and ageing societies, Member States should strengthen work-based learning in their vocational education and training systems (VET) (including through quality and effective apprenticeships) and increase the number of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) graduates both in medium-level VET and in tertiary education. Furthermore, Member States should enhance the labour-market relevance of tertiary education and research, improve skills monitoring and forecasting, make skills more visible and qualifications comparable, including those acquired abroad, and increase opportunities for recognising and validating skills and competences acquired outside formal education and training. They should upgrade and increase the supply and take-up of flexible continuing vocational education and training. Member States should also support low skilled adults to maintain or develop their long-term employability by boosting access to and take up of quality learning opportunities, through the implementation of Upskilling Pathways, including a skills assessment, an offer of education and training matching labour market opportunities, and the validation and recognition of the skills acquired.

Member States should foster equal opportunities for all by eliminating inequalities in education and training systems, including by providing access to good quality and universal inclusive early childhood education. They should raise overall education levels, reduce the number of young people leaving school, increase access to and completion of tertiary education and increase adult participation in continuing learning, particularly among learners from disadvantaged backgrounds, frequently the least qualified. Taking into account new requirements in digital, green and ageing societies, as well as existing gender stereotypes Member States should strengthen work-based learning in their vocational education and training systems (VET) (including through quality and effective apprenticeships) and, not underestimating the importance of continuous investment in human sciences, increase the number of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) graduates through a gender balanced approach both in medium-level VET and in tertiary education. Furthermore, where appropriate Member States should enhance the labour-market relevance of tertiary education and research, strengthen dual and cooperative trainings, improve skills monitoring and forecasting, make skills more visible and qualifications comparable, including those acquired abroad, and increase opportunities for recognising and formally validating skills and competences acquired both in and outside formal education and training. They should upgrade and increase the supply and take-up of more flexible and inclusive continuing vocational education and training. Member States should invest in jobs and social protection schemes for those who are not capable to reskill, and support, through public services, low skilled adults by helping them gain access to stable and quality employment to maintain or develop their long-term employability by boosting access to and take up of quality learning opportunities, through the implementation of Upskilling Pathways, including a skills assessment, an offer of education and training matching labour market opportunities The right to paid educational leave for professional purposes should be encouraged, in line with relevant ILO conventions which allow workers to attend training programmes during working hours. Member States should take the necessary measures to promote universal access to distance learning and training, taking full account of the needs of people with disabilities.

</Amend>

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>18</NumAm>

 

<DocAmend>Proposal for a decision</DocAmend>

<Article>Annex I – Guideline 6 – paragraph 3</Article>

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

Member States should provide unemployed and inactive people with effective, timely, coordinated and tailor-made assistance based on support for job-search, training, requalification and access to other enabling services. Comprehensive strategies that include in-depth individual assessment of unemployment should be pursued as soon as possible with a view to significantly reducing and preventing long-term and structural unemployment. Youth unemployment and the issue of young people not in employment, education or training, should continue to be addressed through prevention of early school leaving and structural improvement in the school-to-work transition, including through the full implementation of the Youth Guarantee (15 ).

Member States should provide unemployed people with effective, timely, coordinated and tailor-made assistance based on support for job-search, training, requalification and access to other enabling services, in particular in the areas of health and housing. Comprehensive strategies that include in-depth individual assessment of unemployed people should be pursued as soon as possible, with a view to significantly reducing and preventing the risk of rising long-term and structural unemployment, including strategies to reduce unemployment among persons with disabilities and other disadvantaged groups. Member States should, with the involvement of the social partners, establish or enhance job transition support mechanisms and systems, with support from the European Social Fund. Youth unemployment, precarious working conditions among young people and the issue of young people not in employment, education or training (NEET’s), should continue to be addressed as a priority through prevention of early school leaving, access to training for future-oriented sectors such as the green and digital economies within structural improvement in the school-to-work transition and access to quality employment to tackle the rising precariousness for young people. The issue should also be addressed through a renewed and effective Youth Guarantee able to provide high-quality offers of work, education or training, which involves all relevant stakeholders in a meaningful manner.

__________________

 

(15) OJ C 120, 26.4.2013, p. 1.

 

</Amend>

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>19</NumAm>

 

<DocAmend>Proposal for a decision</DocAmend>

<Article>Annex I – Guideline 6 – paragraph 4</Article>

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

Member States should aim to remove barriers and disincentives to, and provide incentives for, participation in the labour market, in particular for low income, second earners and those furthest away from the labour market. Member States should support an adapted work environment for people with disabilities, including through targeted financial support and services that enable them to participate in the labour market and in society.

Member States should aim to remove barriers and disincentives to, and provide incentives for accessing the labour market, in particular for disadvantaged groups, and those furthest away from the labour market. Member States should support an adapted work environment for people with disabilities, including through targeted financial support and services that enable them to participate in the labour market and in society.

</Amend>

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>20</NumAm>

 

<DocAmend>Proposal for a decision</DocAmend>

<Article>Annex I – Guideline 6 – paragraph 5</Article>

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

Member States should ensure gender equality and increased labour market participation of women, including through ensuring equal opportunities and career progression and eliminating barriers to participation in leadership at all levels of decision-making. The gender pay gap should be tackled. Equal pay for equal work, or work of equal value, and pay-transparency should be ensured. The reconciliation of work, family and private life for both women and men should be promoted, in particular through access to affordable quality long-term care and early childhood education and care services. Member States should ensure that parents and other people with caring responsibilities have access to suitable family leave and flexible working arrangements in order to balance work, family and private life, and promote a balanced use of these entitlements between women and men.

Member States should ensure gender equality and increased labour market participation of women, including through ensuring equal opportunities and career progression and eliminating barriers to participation in leadership at all levels of decision-making. Member States should make the best efforts to approve and implement the minimum percentage as laid down in the proposed directive on improving the gender balance on corporate boards. The gender pay, pension and employment gaps should be closed. Periods of maternity and parental leave should be adequately valued both in terms of contributions and in terms of pension entitlements, so as to reflect the importance of educating future generations, especially in the context of an ageing society. Equal pay for equal work, or work of equal value, and pay-transparency should be ensured, including by establishing a wage equity index comparing men and women. The reconciliation of work, family and private life for both women and men should be promoted, in particular through access to affordable quality long-term care and early childhood and lifelong education and care services. Member States should ensure that parents and other people with caring responsibilities have access to suitable family leave and flexible working arrangements in order to balance work, family and private life, and promote a balanced use of these entitlements between women and men. They should move towards fully paid maternity and paternity leave.

</Amend>

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>21</NumAm>

 

<DocAmend>Proposal for a decision</DocAmend>

<Article>Annex I – Guideline 7 – paragraph 1</Article>

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

In order to benefit from a dynamic and productive workforce, new work patterns and business models, Member States should work together with the social partners on fair, transparent and predictable working conditions, balancing rights and obligations. They should reduce and prevent segmentation within labour markets, fight undeclared work and foster the transition towards open-ended forms of employment. Employment protection rules, labour law and institutions should all provide both a suitable environment for recruitment, and the necessary flexibility for employers to adapt swiftly to changes in the economic context, while preserving appropriate security and healthy, safe and well-adapted working environments for workers, protecting labour rights and ensuring social protection. Employment relationships that lead to precarious working conditions should be prevented, including in the case of platform workers and by fighting the abuse of atypical contracts. Access to effective and impartial dispute resolution and a right to redress, including adequate compensation, should be ensured in cases of unfair dismissal.

In order to benefit from a dynamic and productive workforce, new work patterns and business models, Member States should work together with the social partners on fair, transparent and predictable working conditions, balancing rights and obligations. The Commission and the Member States should take concrete measures to promote and strengthen social dialogue at all levels and collective bargaining, including Directive 2009/38/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council1a . They should reduce and prevent segmentation within labour markets, fight undeclared work and bogus self-employment and foster the transition towards open-ended forms of employment. Employment protection rules, labour law and institutions should all provide a suitable environment for the creation of stable quality employment while preserving appropriate security and healthy, safe and well-adapted working environments for workers, ensuring labour rights and ensuring decent social protection. They should also work together with trade union representatives to secure a healthy and safe work environment, paying particular attention to the prevention of workplace accidents and diseases. Employment relationships that lead to precarious working conditions and wage competition should be prevented, including in the case of platform workers. There should be no abuse of atypical contracts. Member States should ensure that all these workers genuinely enjoy fair working conditions, social rights and access to adequate social protection and improved representation. To that end, Member States should fully implement the International Labour Organization’s 1947 Convention on Labour Inspection and invest in effective labour inspections by sufficiently empowered competent authorities and coordinate and cooperate within the framework of the European Labour Authority their efforts to combat cross-border abuse. Access to effective and impartial dispute resolution and a right to redress, including adequate compensation, should be ensured in cases of unfair dismissal. Member States must draw on the European network of public employment services and European agencies to identify evidence-based best practices, encourage mutual learning and promote greater coordination of employment policies.

 

____________

 

1a. Directive 2009/38/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 6 May 2009 on the establishment of a European Works Council or a procedure in Community-scale undertakings and Community-scale groups of undertakings for the purposes of informing and consulting employees (OJ L 122, 16.5.2009, p. 28).

</Amend>

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>22</NumAm>

 

<DocAmend>Proposal for a decision</DocAmend>

<Article>Annex I – Guideline 7 – paragraph 2</Article>

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

Policies should aim to improve and support labour-market participation, matching and transitions. Member States should effectively activate and enable those who can participate in the labour market. Member States should strengthen the effectiveness of active labour-market policies by increasing their targeting, outreach, coverage and better linking them with income support for the unemployed, whilst they are seeking work and based on their rights and responsibilities. Member States should aim for more effective and efficient public employment services by ensuring timely and tailor-made assistance to support jobseekers, supporting labour-market demand and implementing performance-based management.

Policies should aim to improve and support labour-market participation, matching and transitions particularly the digital and ecological transitions and to enhance the employment also in disadvantaged territories. Member States should effectively give incentives to those who can participate in the labour market to find quality employment. Member States should strengthen the effectiveness of active labour-market policies by increasing their targeting, outreach, coverage and ensuring decent income support for the unemployed, whilst they are seeking work. Member States should aim for more effective and efficient public employment services, also for cross-border workers, by ensuring timely and tailor-made assistance to support jobseekers and supporting labour-market demand. Quality employment should be the objective of such services.

</Amend>

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>23</NumAm>

 

<DocAmend>Proposal for a decision</DocAmend>

<Article>Annex I – Guideline 7 – paragraph 3</Article>

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

Member States should provide the unemployed with adequate unemployment benefits of reasonable duration, in line with their contributions and national eligibility rules. Such benefits should not dis-incentivise a prompt return to employment and should be accompanied by active labour market policies

Member States should provide the unemployed with adequate unemployment benefits of sufficient duration, in line with their contributions and national eligibility rules. This should be accompanied by active labour market policies and with the support of mutual learning mechanisms between Member States.

</Amend>

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>24</NumAm>

 

<DocAmend>Proposal for a decision</DocAmend>

<Article>Annex I – Guideline 7 – paragraph 4</Article>

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

The mobility of learners and workers should be adequately supported with the aim of enhancing employability, skills and exploiting the full potential of the European labour market, while also ensuring fair conditions for all those pursuing a cross-border activity and stepping up administrative cooperation between national administrations with regard to mobile workers. Barriers to mobility in education and training, in occupational and personal pensions and in the recognition of qualifications should be removed and recognition of qualifications made easier. Member States should take action to ensure that administrative procedures are not an unnecessary obstacle to workers from other Member States taking up employment, including for cross-border workers. Member States should also prevent abuse of the existing rules and address underlying causes of ‘brain drain’ from certain regions including through appropriate regional development measures.

Member States must support labour mobility throughout Europe as a way to create new job opportunities for workers. The mobility of learners should be adequately supported during their training, in particular by strengthening the ERASMUS+ mobility programme, which allows learners to increase their know-how and skills. Workers should also be encouraged with the aim of enhancing employability and skills to exploit the full potential of the European labour market. While ensuring the rights and fair working conditions for all those pursuing a cross-border activity, the portability of rights and entitlements should be stepped up by administrative cooperation between national administrations with regard to mobile workers. Barriers to mobility in education and training, in occupational and personal pensions and in the recognition of qualifications should be removed and recognition of qualifications made easier. Member States should take action to ensure that administrative procedures are not an unnecessary obstacle to workers from other Member States taking up employment, including for cross-border and frontier workers. Member States should commit themselves to the digitalisation of public services in order to facilitate fair labour mobility, particularly with regard to the coordination of social security systems. It will be important for Member States to take mobile workers, including frontier workers, into account when implementing measures such as the closing of borders in order to mitigate the spread of COVID-19, for instance in terms of health and safety, taxes and social security and coordination. Member States should allow mobile and frontier workers to continue crossing borders, when it is deemed to be safe in line with EU-OSHA health and safety guidelines. Member States should also prevent abuse of the existing rules and address underlying causes of ‘brain drain’ from certain regions which damage the development and attractiveness of those areas, including through appropriate regional development measures. Member States should promote and use relevant European tools, such as the job network EURES, and increase cross-border partnerships to help mobile workers in cross-border regions.

</Amend>

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>25</NumAm>

 

<DocAmend>Proposal for a decision</DocAmend>

<Article>Annex I – Guideline 7 – paragraph 5</Article>

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

Building on existing national practices, and in order to achieve more effective social dialogue, and better socioeconomic outcomes, Member States should ensure the timely and meaningful involvement of the social partners in the design and implementation of employment, social and, where relevant, economic reforms and policies, including by supporting increased capacity of the social partners. Member States should foster social dialogue and collective bargaining. The social partners should be encouraged to negotiate and conclude collective agreements in matters relevant to them, fully respecting their autonomy and the right to collective action.

Building on existing national practices, and in order to promote and achieve more effective and intensive social dialogue, and better socioeconomic outcomes, Member States should ensure the timely and meaningful involvement of the social partners in the design and implementation of employment, social and, where relevant, economic reforms and policies, including by supporting increased capacity of the social partners. Member States should strengthen and promote social dialogue and collective bargaining. The social partners should be encouraged to negotiate and conclude collective agreements in matters relevant to them, fully respecting their autonomy and the right to collective action.

</Amend>

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>26</NumAm>

 

<DocAmend>Proposal for a decision</DocAmend>

<Article>Annex I – Guideline 7 – paragraph 6</Article>

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

Where relevant and building on existing national practices, Member States should take into account the experience on employment and social issues of relevant civil society organisations.

Where relevant and building on existing national practices, Member States should take into account the experience on employment and social issues of relevant civil society organisations, including those representing groups facing barriers to quality work.

</Amend>

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>27</NumAm>

 

<DocAmend>Proposal for a decision</DocAmend>

<Article>Annex I – Guideline 7 – paragraph 6 a (new)</Article>

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

A healthy and safe workplace is vital in order to combat the risk of getting infected and spreading viruses and other diseases. Member States should ensure that employers take their responsibility of the health and safety of their workers and provide them and their representatives with adequate information, make risk assessments and take prevention measures. This includes reducing the number of fatal accidents at work and cases of occupational cancer to zero by establishing binding occupational exposure limit values, and taking into account occupational psycho-social risks and occupational diseases. To enhance the functioning of labour markets, Member States should invest in occupational health and safety, and ensure adequate means and provisions for labour inspectorates and trade union health and safety representatives.

</Amend>

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>28</NumAm>

<DocAmend>Proposal for a decision</DocAmend>

<Article>Annex I – Guideline 7 – paragraph 6 b (new)</Article>

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

Member States should work together in providing social protection systems for frontier workers and self-employed workers who work and live in different Member States. The modernisation of social protection system should be conducive to the principles of the European labour market providing for a sustainable social protection that is universal and trans-border. This should guarantee the protection and effectiveness of social protection systems that addresses the gaps in protection and guarantee a productive frontier workforce.

</Amend>

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>29</NumAm>

<DocAmend>Proposal for a decision</DocAmend>

<Article>Annex I – Guideline 7 – paragraph 6 c (new)</Article>

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

Member States should address the impact of the COVID-19 crisis on the labour market by supporting workers who are temporarily in “technical unemployment” because the employers were forced to close their services as well as by supporting self-employed people and small businesses to retain staff and maintain their activities.

<TitreJust>Justification</TitreJust>

The COVID-19 crisis already has a considerable impact on the labour markets that will further evolve as the pandemic lasts and the preventive measures introduced to contain its spread are in force. Measures targeted at individuals to ensure a stable income, at small businesses to preserve jobs and at self-employed to support their further operation or living are of key importance to prevent unprecedented hikes in unemployment, large-scale loss of jobs and ceasing of masses of companies and to ensure an easier economic recovery after the pandemic recedes.

</Amend>

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>30</NumAm>

 

<DocAmend>Proposal for a decision</DocAmend>

<Article>Annex I – Guideline 8 – paragraph 1</Article>

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

Member States should promote inclusive labour markets, open to all, by putting in place effective measures to fight all forms of discrimination and promote equal opportunities for under-represented groups in the labour market, with due attention to the regional and territorial dimension. They should ensure equal treatment regarding employment, social protection, health and long-term care, education and access to goods and services, regardless of gender, racial or ethnic origin, religion or belief, disability, age or sexual orientation.

Member States should promote social rights and inclusive labour markets, as part of an integrated active inclusion strategy, open to all, by putting in place effective measures to fight all forms of discrimination and promote equal opportunities for under-represented groups in the labour market, with due attention to the regional and territorial dimension. They should ensure equal remuneration and equal rights for equal work at the same place as well as equal treatment regarding employment, social protection, health and long-term care, housing, education and access to goods and services, regardless of gender, racial or ethnic origin, nationality, religion or belief, disability, age or sexual orientation.

</Amend>

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>31</NumAm>

 

<DocAmend>Proposal for a decision</DocAmend>

<Article>Annex I – Guideline 8 – paragraph 2</Article>

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

Member States should modernise social protection systems to provide adequate, effective, efficient, and sustainable social protection throughout all stages of an individual's life, fostering social inclusion and upward social mobility, incentivising labour market participation and addressing inequalities, including through the design of their tax and benefit systems. Complementing universal approaches with selective ones will improve effectiveness of social protection systems. The modernisation of social protection systems should lead to better access, quality, adequacy and sustainability.

Member States should modernise and invest in social protection systems to provide adequate, effective, efficient, and sustainable social protection for all throughout all stages of an individual's life, fighting poverty and fostering social inclusion and upward social convergence, supporting labour market participation and access to quality jobs addressing inequalities, including through the progressive design of their tax and benefit systems. Complementing universal approaches with additional selective ones will improve effectiveness of social protection systems, leading to better access, quality, adequacy and sustainability.

</Amend>

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>32</NumAm>

 

<DocAmend>Proposal for a decision</DocAmend>

<Article>Annex I – Guideline 8 – paragraph 3</Article>

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

Member States should develop and integrate the three strands of active inclusion: adequate income support, inclusive labour markets and access to quality enabling services, meeting individual needs. Social protection systems should ensure adequate minimum income benefits for everyone lacking sufficient resources and promote social inclusion by encouraging people to actively participate in the labour market and society, including through targeted social services.

Member States should develop and integrate the three strands of active inclusion: adequate income support, inclusive labour markets and access to quality services, meeting individual needs. Social protection systems should ensure adequate minimum income benefits for everyone lacking sufficient resources and promote social inclusion by supporting people to actively participate in the labour market and society, including through targeted social services.

</Amend>

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>33</NumAm>

 

<DocAmend>Proposal for a decision</DocAmend>

<Article>Annex I – Guideline 8 – paragraph 4</Article>

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

The availability of affordable, accessible and quality services such as early childhood education and care, out-of-school care, education, training, housing, health and long-term care is a necessary condition for ensuring equal opportunities. Particular attention should be given to fighting poverty and social exclusion, including in-work and child poverty. Member States should ensure that everyone, including children, has access to essential services. For those in need or in a vulnerable situation, Member States should ensure access to adequate social housing or housing assistance. The specific needs of people with disabilities including accessibility should be taken into account in relation to these services. Homelessness should be tackled specifically.

Taking into consideration the continuing alarming levels of poverty, which are substantively higher than the poverty target established in 2010 in the Europe 2020 strategy, and the impact of the COVID-19 crisis, more efforts are necessary to fight poverty and social exclusion, with a special focus and horizontal strategies on the working-poor, children, older persons, single parents and especially single mothers, ethnic minorities, migrants, persons with disabilities and the homeless. At the same time, particular attention should be paid to the potential impact of the COVID-19 crisis on other groups, such as people in precarious work or people who are newly unemployed. With regard to investing in children, Member States should adopt a Child Guarantee for tackling child poverty and promoting children’s wellbeing, thereby contributing to children’s equal access to free healthcare, free education, free childcare, decent housing and adequate nutrition. Member States should ensure that everyone has access to quality services. For those in need or in a vulnerable situation, Member States should ensure access to adequate social housing or housing assistance, investment in accessible housing stock for persons with reduced mobility, take measure to ensure a just transition as regards improving the energy efficiency of existing housing and to tackle the problem of energy poverty in the context of the European Green Deal, as well as adequate services for homeless people. Member States should tackle the problem of evictions, which are increasing. The specific needs of people with disabilities including accessibility should be taken into account in relation to these services. Homelessness should be tackled decisively taking the Housing First approach as a basis.

</Amend>

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>34</NumAm>

 

<DocAmend>Proposal for a decision</DocAmend>

<Article>Annex I – Guideline 8 – paragraph 5</Article>

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

Member States should ensure timely access to affordable preventive and curative health care and long-term care of good quality, while safeguarding sustainability over the long run.

The COVID-19 crisis demonstrates the need for more public investment to ensure sufficient levels of well-trained staff and access to healthcare for all, including vulnerable groups. Therefore, Member States should guarantee the universal access to affordable public preventive and curative health and long-term care of high and sustainable quality.

</Amend>

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>35</NumAm>

<DocAmend>Proposal for a decision</DocAmend>

<Article>Annex I – Guideline 8 – paragraph 5 a (new)</Article>

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

Member States must protect the health of the elderly, providing them with necessary hospital treatment and healthcare and avoiding any age-based discrimination.

</Amend>

<Amend>Amendment  <NumAm>36</NumAm>

 

<DocAmend>Proposal for a decision</DocAmend>

<Article>Annex I – Guideline 8 – paragraph 6</Article>

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

In a context of increasing longevity and demographic change, Member States should secure the adequacy and sustainability of pension systems for workers and self-employed, providing equal opportunities for women and men to acquire pension rights, including through supplementary schemes to ensure an adequate income. Pension reforms should be supported by measures that extend working lives, such as by raising the effective retirement age, and be framed within active ageing strategies. Member States should establish a constructive dialogue with social partners and other relevant stakeholders, and allow an appropriate phasing in of the reforms.

In a context of increasing longevity and demographic change, Member States should secure the adequacy and sustainability of pension systems for workers and self-employed, providing equal opportunities for women and men to acquire pension rights in the public or occupational schemes in order to ensure an decent retirement income above the poverty line. Pension reforms should be supported by measures based on active ageing through optimising opportunities for workers of all ages to work in good quality, productive and healthy conditions until legal retirement age, while respecting the decisions of senior citizens to either remain economically active for longer, or no longer to participate in the labour market. Specific measures should be identified in the field of workforce demography, health and safety at the workplace, skills and competence management, work organisation for healthy and productive working lives, within an inter-generational approach. This would facilitate both youth employment and pre-retirement transition, together with the transfer of knowledge and experience from one generation to the next. Member States should establish a constructive dialogue with the social partners, civil society organisations and other relevant stakeholders, including direct dialogue with those facing old-age poverty and exclusion and allow an appropriate phasing in of any reforms.

</Amend>

 

</RepeatBlock-Amend>

PROCEDURE – COMMITTEE RESPONSIBLE

Title

Guidelines for the employment policies of the Member States

References

COM(2020)0070 – C9-0079/2020 – 2020/0030(NLE)

Date of consultation / request for consent

6.3.2020

 

 

 

Committee responsible

 Date announced in plenary

EMPL

11.3.2020

 

 

 

Rapporteurs

 Date appointed

José Gusmão

18.3.2020

 

 

 

Date adopted

23.6.2020

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

46

5

3

Members present for the final vote

Atidzhe Alieva-Veli, Marc Angel, Gabriele Bischoff, Vilija Blinkevičiūtė, Andrea Bocskor, Milan Brglez, Sylvie Brunet, David Casa, Leila Chaibi, Margarita de la Pisa Carrión, Klára Dobrev, Jarosław Duda, Estrella Durá Ferrandis, Lucia Ďuriš Nicholsonová, Rosa Estaràs Ferragut, Nicolaus Fest, Loucas Fourlas, Cindy Franssen, Heléne Fritzon, Helmut Geuking, Alicia Homs Ginel, France Jamet, Agnes Jongerius, Radan Kanev, Ádám Kósa, Stelios Kympouropoulos, Katrin Langensiepen, Miriam Lexmann, Elena Lizzi, Radka Maxová, Sandra Pereira, Dragoș Pîslaru, Manuel Pizarro, Dennis Radtke, Elżbieta Rafalska, Guido Reil, Daniela Rondinelli, Mounir Satouri, Monica Semedo, Beata Szydło, Eugen Tomac, Romana Tomc, Yana Toom, Marie-Pierre Vedrenne, Nikolaj Villumsen, Marianne Vind, Maria Walsh, Stefania Zambelli, Tatjana Ždanoka, Tomáš Zdechovský

Substitutes present for the final vote

Anna Júlia Donáth, José Gusmão, Pierfrancesco Majorino, Kim Van Sparrentak

Date tabled

25.6.2020

 


 

FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE RESPONSIBLE

46

+

ECR

Lucia Ďuriš Nicholsonová, Helmut Geuking, Elżbieta Rafalska, Beata Szydło

GUE/NGL

Leila Chaibi, José Gusmão, Nikolaj Villumsen

NI

Daniela Rondinelli

PPE

Andrea Bocskor, David Casa, Jarosław Duda, Rosa Estaràs Ferragut, Loucas Fourlas, Cindy Franssen, Radan Kanev, Stelios Kympouropoulos, Ádám Kósa, Miriam Lexmann, Dennis Radtke, Eugen Tomac, Romana Tomc, Maria Walsh, Tomáš Zdechovský

Renew

Atidzhe Alieva‑Veli, Sylvie Brunet, Anna Júlia Donáth, Dragoș Pîslaru, Monica Semedo, Yana Toom, Marie‑Pierre Vedrenne

S&D

Marc Angel, Gabriele Bischoff, Vilija Blinkevičiūtė, Milan Brglez, Klára Dobrev, Estrella Durá Ferrandis, Heléne Fritzon, Alicia Homs Ginel, Agnes Jongerius, Pierfrancesco Majorino, Manuel Pizarro, Marianne Vind

Verts/ALE

Katrin Langensiepen, Mounir Satouri, Kim Van Sparrentak, Tatjana Ždanoka

 

5

-

ID

Nicolaus Fest, France Jamet, Elena Lizzi, Guido Reil, Stefania Zambelli

 

3

0

ECR

Margarita de la Pisa Carrión

GUE/NGL

Sandra Pereira

Renew

Radka Maxová

 

Key to symbols:

+ : in favour

- : against

0 : abstention

 

 

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