REPORT on the proposal for a regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the deployment of alternative fuels infrastructure, and repealing Directive 2014/94/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council

4.10.2022 - (COM(2021)0559 – C9‑0331/2021 – 2021/0223(COD)) - ***I

Committee on Transport and Tourism
Rapporteur: Ismail Ertug


Procedure : 2021/0223(COD)
Document stages in plenary
Document selected :  
A9-0234/2022

DRAFT EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT LEGISLATIVE RESOLUTION

on the proposal for a regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the deployment of alternative fuels infrastructure, and repealing Directive 2014/94/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council

(COM(2021)0559 – C9‑0331/2021 – 2021/0223(COD))

(Ordinary legislative procedure: first reading)

The European Parliament,

 having regard to the Commission proposal to Parliament and the Council (COM(2021)0559),

 having regard to Article 294(2) and Article 91 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, pursuant to which the Commission submitted the proposal to Parliament (C9‑0331/2021),

 having regard to Article 294(3) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union,

 having regard to the reasoned opinion submitted, within the framework of Protocol No 2 on the application of the principles of subsidiarity and proportionality, by the French National Assembly, asserting that the draft legislative act does not comply with the principle of subsidiarity,

 having regard to the opinion of the European Economic and Social Committtee of 8 December 2021,

 having regard to the opinion of the Committee of the Regions,

 having regard to Rule 59 of its Rules of Procedure,

 having regard to the opinions of the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety, the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy and the Committee on Regional Development

 having regard to the report of the Committee on Transport and Tourism (A9-0234/2022),

1. Adopts its position at first reading hereinafter set out;

2. Calls on the Commission to refer the matter to Parliament again if it replaces, substantially amends or intends to substantially amend its proposal;

3. Instructs its President to forward its position to the Council, the Commission and the national parliaments.

 

Amendment  1

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 1

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(1) Directive 2014/94/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council43 laid down a framework for the deployment of alternative fuels infrastructure. The Commission Communication on the application of that Directive44 points to the uneven development of recharging and refuelling infrastructure across the Union and the lack of interoperability and user friendliness. It notes that the absence of a clear common methodology for setting targets and adopting measures under the National Policy Frameworks required by Directive 2014/94/EU has led to a situation whereby the level of ambition in target setting and supporting policies varies greatly among Member States.

(1) Directive 2014/94/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council43 laid down a framework for the deployment of alternative fuels infrastructure. The Commission Communication on the application of that Directive44 points to the uneven development of recharging and refuelling infrastructure across the Union and the lack of interoperability and user friendliness. It notes that the absence of a clear common methodology for setting targets and adopting measures under the National Policy Frameworks required by Directive 2014/94/EU has led to a situation whereby the level of ambition in target setting and supporting policies varies greatly among Member States. This, in turn, has resulted in the failure to deliver a comprehensive and complete network of alternative fuels infrastructure across the Union.

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43 Directive 2014/94/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 22 October 2014 on the deployment of alternative fuels infrastructure (OJ L 307, 28.10.2014, p. 1).

43 Directive 2014/94/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 22 October 2014 on the deployment of alternative fuels infrastructure (OJ L 307, 28.10.2014, p. 1).

44 COM(2020) 789 final.

44 COM(2020) 789 final.

Amendment  2

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 3

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(3) Regulation (EU) 2019/631 of the European Parliament and of the Council46 and Regulation (EU) 2019/1242 of the European Parliament and of the Council47 already set CO2 emission performance standards for new passenger cars and for new light commercial vehicles as well as for certain heavy-duty vehicles. Those instruments should accelerate the uptake in particular of zero-emission vehicles and thereby create demand for recharging and refuelling infrastructure.

(3) Regulation (EU) 2019/631 of the European Parliament and of the Council46 and Regulation (EU) 2019/1242 of the European Parliament and of the Council47 already set CO2 emission performance standards for new passenger cars and for new light commercial vehicles as well as for certain heavy-duty vehicles. The revision of those instruments should be aligned with the revision of the current Regulation in order to ensure a coherent framework for the use and deployment of alternative fuels in road transport and in order to accelerate the uptake in particular of zero-emission vehicles and alternative fuels and thereby create demand for recharging and refuelling infrastructure.

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46 Regulation (EU) 2019/631 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 17 April 2019 setting CO2 emission performance standards for new passenger cars and for new light commercial vehicles, and repealing Regulations (EC) No 443/2009 and (EU) No 510/2011 (OJ L 111, 25.4.2019, p. 13).

46 Regulation (EU) 2019/631 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 17 April 2019 setting CO2 emission performance standards for new passenger cars and for new light commercial vehicles, and repealing Regulations (EC) No 443/2009 and (EU) No 510/2011 (OJ L 111, 25.4.2019, p. 13).

47 Regulation (EU) 2019/1242 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 20 June 2019 setting CO2 emission performance standards for new heavy-duty vehicles and amending Regulations (EC) No 595/2009 and (EU) 2018/956 of the European Parliament and of the Council and Council Directive 96/53/EC (OJ L 198, 25.7.2019, p. 202).

47 Regulation (EU) 2019/1242 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 20 June 2019 setting CO2 emission performance standards for new heavy-duty vehicles and amending Regulations (EC) No 595/2009 and (EU) 2018/956 of the European Parliament and of the Council and Council Directive 96/53/EC (OJ L 198, 25.7.2019, p. 202).

Amendment  3

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 4

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(4) The initiatives on ReFuelEU aviation48 and FuelEU maritime49 should boost the production and uptake of sustainable alternative fuels in aviation and maritime transport. While the fuel use requirements for the sustainable aviation fuels can largely rely on the existing refuelling infrastructure, investments are needed for the electricity supply of stationary aircraft. The FuelEU maritime initiative sets requirements in particular for the use of on shore power that can only be fulfilled if an adequate level of on shore power supply is deployed in TEN-T ports. However those initiatives do not contain any provisions on the required fuel infrastructure which are a prerequisite that the targets can be met.

(4) The initiatives on ReFuelEU aviation48 and FuelEU maritime49 should boost the production and uptake of sustainable alternative fuels in aviation and maritime transport. While the fuel use requirements for the sustainable aviation fuels can largely rely on the existing refuelling infrastructure, investments are needed for the electricity supply of stationary aircraft. Moreover, Member States and the Commission should assess the current state and future development of the hydrogen market for aviation and should provide for a feasibility study on the deployment of the relevant infrastructure to power aircraft including, where appropriate, a deployment plan for alternative fuels infrastructure in airports, in particular for hydrogen and electric recharging for aircrafts. The FuelEU maritime initiative sets requirements in particular for the use of on shore power that can only be fulfilled if an adequate level of on shore power supply is deployed in TEN-T ports. However those initiatives do not contain any provisions on the required fuel infrastructure which are a prerequisite that the targets can be met.

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48 COM(2021) 561.

48 COM(2021) 561.

49 COM(2021) 562.

49 COM(2021) 562.

Amendment  4

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 5

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(5) Therefore all modes of transport should be addressed in one instrument which should take into account a variety of alternative fuels. The use of zero-emission powertrain technologies is at different stages of maturity in the different modes of transport. In particular, in the road sector, a rapid uptake of battery-electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles is taking place. Hydrogen fuel-cell road vehicles are available to markets, as well. In addition, smaller hydrogen and battery electric vessels and hydrogen fuel-cell trains are currently being deployed in different projects and in first commercial operations, with full commercial roll out expected in the next years. In contrast, the aviation and waterborne sectors continue to be dependent on liquid and gaseous fuels, as zero- and low-emission powertrain solutions are expected to enter the market only around 2030 and in particular for the aviation sector even later, with full commercialisation taking its time. The use of fossil gaseous or liquid fuels is only possible if it is clearly embedded into a clear decarbonisation pathway that is in line with the long-term objective of climate neutrality in the Union, requiring increasing blending with or replacement by renewable fuels such as bio-methane, advanced biofuels or renewable and low-carbon synthetic gaseous and liquid fuels.

(5) Therefore all modes of transport should be addressed in one instrument which should take into account a variety of alternative fuels. The use of zero-emission powertrain technologies is at different stages of maturity in the different modes of transport and in the different Member States and regions. In particular, in the road sector, a rapid uptake of battery-electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles is taking place, therefore more ambitious targets for these mature technologies are required. Hydrogen fuel-cell road vehicles are available to markets, as well, albeit to a lesser degree. In addition, smaller hydrogen and battery electric vessels and hydrogen fuel-cell trains are currently being deployed in different projects and in first commercial operations, with full commercial roll out expected in the next years. In contrast, the aviation and waterborne sectors continue to be dependent on liquid and gaseous fuels, as zero- and low-emission powertrain solutions are expected to enter the market only around 2030 and in particular for the aviation sector even later, with full commercialisation taking its time. The Union should increase its efforts to phase out fossil gaseous or liquid fuels and promote renewable alternatives, and the use of fossil fuels should only be possible if it is clearly embedded into a clear decarbonisation pathway that is in line with the long-term objective of climate neutrality in the Union, requiring increasing blending with or replacement by renewable fuels such as bio-methane, advanced biofuels or renewable and low-carbon synthetic gaseous and liquid fuels.

Amendment  5

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 6

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(6) Such biofuels and synthetic fuels, substituting diesel, petrol and jet fuel, can be produced from different feedstock and can be blended into fossil fuels at very high blending ratios. They can be technically used with the current vehicle technology with minor adaptations. Renewable methanol can also be used for inland navigation and short-sea shipping. Synthetic and paraffinic fuels have a potential to reduce the use of fossil fuel sources in the energy supply to transport. All of these fuels can be distributed, stored and used with the existing infrastructure or where necessary with infrastructure of the same kind.

(6) In order to maximise the potential of reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, such biofuels, including biogas, and synthetic fuels, substituting diesel, petrol and jet fuel, can be produced from different feedstock and can be blended into fossil fuels at very high blending ratios. This is especially important for the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions in the aviation and maritime transport sectors for which electrification will be slower. Those fuels can be technically used with the current vehicle technology with minor adaptations. Renewable methanol can also be used for inland navigation and short-sea shipping. Synthetic and paraffinic fuels have a potential to reduce the use of fossil fuel sources in the energy supply to transport. All of these fuels can be distributed, stored and used with the existing infrastructure or where necessary with infrastructure of the same kind.

Amendment  6

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 6 a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(6 a) It is important to observe the general principles of technological neutrality and energy efficiency first among those technologies necessary to achieve climate neutrality, as some of the technologies that will be needed in the foreseeable future still require investments in research and development, while maintaining market competition between the different alternative technologies, taking due account of affordability and the different starting points of Member States.

Amendment  7

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 7

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(7) LNG is likely to play a continued role in maritime transport, where there is currently no economically viable zero-emission powertrain technology available. The Communication on the Smart and Sustainable Mobility Strategy points to zero-emission seagoing ships becoming market ready by 2030. Fleet conversion should take place gradually due to the long lifetime of the ships. Contrary to maritime transport, for inland waterways, with normally smaller vessels and shorter distances, zero-emission powertrain technologies, such as hydrogen and electricity, should enter the markets more quickly. LNG is expected to no longer play a significant role in that sector. Transport fuels such as LNG need increasingly to be decarbonised by blending/substituting with liquefied biomethane (bio-LNG) or renewable and low-carbon synthetic gaseous e-fuels (e-gas) for instance. Those decarbonised fuels can be used in the same infrastructure as gaseous fossil fuels thereby allowing for a gradual shift towards decarbonised fuels.

(7) The sustained use of liquefied natural gas (LNG) is not compatible with the Union's climate neutrality objective. Therefore, LNG in maritime transport should be phased out as soon as possible and substituted by more sustainable alternatives. However, in the short term, LNG is likely to play a transitional role in maritime transport, where there is currently no economically viable zero-emission powertrain technology available. The Communication on the Smart and Sustainable Mobility Strategy points to zero-emission seagoing ships becoming market ready by 2030 and such projects are already underway. Further developments in this regard should be promoted, duly monitored and reported. Fleet conversion should take place gradually due to the long lifetime of the ships. Given the transitional role of LNG, the availability of LNG bunkering infrastructure in ports should be demand driven, in particular as regards new public investments. Contrary to maritime transport, for inland waterways, with normally smaller vessels and shorter distances, zero-emission powertrain technologies, such as hydrogen and electricity, are becoming mature technologies and should enter the markets more quickly and could play an important role for maritime transport in terms of creating scale regarding zero-emission propulsion solutions. LNG is expected to no longer play a significant role in that sector. Transport fuels such as LNG need increasingly to be decarbonised by blending/substituting with liquefied biomethane (bio-LNG) or renewable and low-carbon synthetic gaseous e-fuels (e-gas) for instance. Those decarbonised fuels can be used in the same infrastructure as gaseous fossil fuels thereby allowing for a gradual shift towards decarbonised fuels.

Amendment  8

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 9

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(9) The deployment of publicly accessible recharging infrastructure for light-duty electric vehicles has been uneven across the Union. Continued uneven distribution would jeopardize the uptake of such vehicles, limiting connectivity across the Union. Continuing divergence in policy ambitions and approaches at national level will not create the long-term certainty needed for substantive market investment. Mandatory minimum targets for Member States at national level should therefore provide policy orientations and complement National Policy Frameworks. That approach should combine national fleet based targets with distance-based targets for the trans-European network for transport (TEN-T). National fleet based targets should ensure that vehicle uptake in each Member State is matched with the deployment of sufficient publicly accessible recharging infrastructure. Distance-based targets for the TEN-T network should ensure full coverage of electric recharging points along the Union’s main road networks and thereby ensure easy and seamless travel throughout the Union.

(9) The deployment of publicly accessible recharging infrastructure for light-duty electric vehicles has been uneven across the Union and across regions. Continued uneven distribution would jeopardize the uptake of such vehicles, limiting connectivity across the Union. Continuing divergence in policy ambitions and approaches at national level will hinder the much-needed sustainable transition of the transport sector and not contribute to creating the long-term certainty needed for substantive market investment. Mandatory minimum targets for Member States at national level should therefore provide policy orientations and complement National Policy Frameworks. That approach should combine national fleet based targets with distance-based targets for the trans-European network for transport (TEN-T). National fleet based targets should ensure that vehicle uptake in each Member State is matched with the deployment of sufficient publicly accessible recharging infrastructure, especially in geographic areas where owners of light-duty vehicles are less likely to own private parking lots. Special attention and higher national deployment rates are also needed for centres of relatively higher population density and higher electric vehicles market-share. Once a certain share of electric vehicles uptake has been reached in the given Member State, the market should self-regulate. Distance-based targets for the TEN-T network should ensure full coverage of electric recharging points along the Union’s main road networks and thereby ensure easy and seamless travel throughout the Union, including in and to the outermost regions and islands of the Union, unless the costs involved are disproportionate to the benefits, in which case Member States may make exemptions or consider developing off-grid infrastructure. The development of such a network of infrastructure would facilitate the accessibility and connectivity of all regions in the Union, including the outermost regions and other remote or rural areas, strengthening social, economic and territorial cohesion between them.

Amendment  9

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 10

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(10) National fleet based targets should be established on the basis of the total number of registered electric vehicles in that Member State following a common methodology that accounts for technological developments such as the increased driving range of electric vehicles or the increasing market penetration of fast-charging points which can recharge a greater number of vehicles per recharging point than at a normal recharging point. The methodology also has to take into account the different recharging patterns of battery electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles. A methodology that norms national fleet based targets on the total maximum power output of the publicly accessible recharging infrastructure should allow flexibility for the implementation of different recharging technologies in Member States.

(10) National fleet based targets should be established on the basis of the share of registered electric vehicles in that Member State's total vehicle fleet, following a common methodology that accounts for technological developments such as the increased driving range of electric vehicles or the increasing market penetration of fast-charging points which can recharge a greater number of vehicles per recharging point than at a normal recharging point. The methodology also has to take into account the different recharging patterns of battery electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles, as well as population and market shares of electric vehicles. A methodology that norms national fleet based targets on the total maximum power output of the publicly accessible recharging infrastructure should allow flexibility for the implementation of different recharging technologies in Member States. Furthermore, the Commission should assess how vehicles with integrated solar panels may impact the deployment of publicly accessible recharging infrastructure and, if appropriate, any consequential adjustment of the charging infrastructure deployment targets of this Regulation.

Amendment  10

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 11

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(11) Implementation in Member States should ensure that a sufficient number of publicly accessible recharging points is installed, in particular at public transport stations, such as port passenger terminals, airports or railway stations. A sufficient number of publicly accessible fast recharging points dedicated to light-duty vehicles should also be deployed to increase consumer convenience in particular across the TEN-T network to ensure full cross-border connectivity and allow electric vehicles to circulate throughout the Union.

(11) Implementation in Member States should ensure that a sufficient number of publicly accessible fixed, off-grid or mobile recharging points is installed in a manner that supports territorial balance and multimodal travelling, avoids regional disparities and ensures that no territory is left behind. Deployment is particularly important in residential areas with a lack of off-street parking and where vehicles typically park for extended periods of time, including taxi parking areas and at public transport stations, such as port passenger terminals, airports or railway stations. A sufficient number of publicly accessible fast recharging points dedicated to light-duty vehicles should also be deployed to increase consumer convenience in particular across the TEN-T network to ensure full cross-border connectivity and allow electric vehicles to circulate throughout the Union.

Amendment  11

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 11 a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(11 a) The deployment of publicly accessible recharging infrastructure should primarily result from private market investment. However, until a competitive market has been established, Member States should support infrastructure deployment in cases where market conditions require public support, provided that such public support is in full compliance with State aid rules. Where relevant, Member States should also take into account that in certain portions of their territory, the demand for an adequate number of charging points might vary throughout the year, as it is the case in many touristic destinations. In such cases the possibility of deploying a temporary mobile off-grid charging infrastructure could offer added flexibility and facilitate meeting seasonal demand without requiring the installation of fixed infrastructure.

Amendment  12

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 11 b (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(11 b) The Commission should review, if necessary, the targets set in this Regulation for electric recharging infrastructure dedicated to light-duty and heavy-duty vehicles respectively, to ensure their compatibility with the requirements set in the Union Regulations on CO2 emission performance standards for light-duty vehicles and for heavy-duty vehicles, respectively.

Amendment  13

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 11 c (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(11 c) The Commission should review the need to include requirements for charging infrastructure to serve electrically power assisted cycles and L-category vehicles such as powered electric cycles and e-mopeds, and in particular the opportunity to equip charging infrastructure with a household power socket that makes it possible for such vehicles to be easily charged, since they represent a mode of transport that can help further reduce CO2 emissions and air pollution.

Amendment  14

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 13

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(13) Electric heavy-duty vehicles need a distinctively different recharging infrastructure than light-duty vehicles. Public accessible infrastructure for electric heavy-duty vehicles is however currently almost nowhere available in the Union. A combined approach of distance-based targets along the TEN-T network, targets for overnight recharging infrastructure and targets at urban nodes should ensure that a sufficient publicly accessible infrastructure coverage for electric heavy-duty vehicles is established throughout the Union to support the expected market uptake of battery electric heavy-duty vehicles.

(13) Electric heavy-duty vehicles need a distinctively different recharging infrastructure than light-duty vehicles. Public accessible infrastructure for electric heavy-duty vehicles is however currently almost nowhere available in the Union and the deployment of infrastructure therefore needs to be accelerated. A combined approach of distance-based targets along the TEN-T network, targets for overnight recharging infrastructure and targets at urban nodes should ensure that a sufficient publicly accessible infrastructure coverage for electric heavy-duty vehicles is established throughout the Union to proactively support the market share increase of battery electric heavy-duty vehicles.

Amendment  15

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 13 a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(13 a) Therefore, an initial public investment in infrastructure for electric heavy-duty vehicles is needed, whereas any further infrastructure development beyond the one provided for in this Regulation should be conditional on their Union-wide, national and regional market share development and relevant traffic data.

Amendment  16

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 14 a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(14 a) New charging infrastructure standards for heavy-duty vehicles are currently being developed. It is technically possible to ensure the upgradability of the physical connections and communication exchange protocols so that individual charging stations and charging points can be upgraded to a new standard at a later stage. Therefore, the Commission should consider increasing the individual power output of recharging stations at recharging pools as soon as the new common technical specifications are available.

Amendment  17

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 17

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(17) Publicly accessible recharging or refuelling points include, for example, privately owned recharging or refuelling points accessible to the public that are located on public or private properties, such as public parkings or parkings of supermarkets. A recharging or refuelling point located on a private property that is accessible to the general public should be considered as publicly accessible also in cases where access is restricted to a certain general group of users, for example to clients. Recharging or refuelling points for car-sharing schemes should only be considered accessible to the public if they explicitly allow access for third party users. Recharging or refuelling points located on private properties, access to which is restricted to a limited, determinate circle of persons, such as parking lots in office buildings to which only employees or authorised persons have access, should not be considered as publicly accessible recharging or refuelling points.

(17) Publicly accessible recharging or refuelling points include, for example, privately owned recharging or refuelling points accessible to the public that are located on public or private properties, such as public parkings or parkings of supermarkets. In such locations, where parking facilities have more than 30 parking spaces, Member States should ensure that a sufficient number of publicly accessible recharging or refuelling points is deployed. A recharging or refuelling point located on a private property that is accessible to the general public should be considered as publicly accessible also in cases where access is restricted to a certain general group of users, for example to clients. Recharging or refuelling points for car-sharing schemes should only be considered accessible to the public if they explicitly allow access for third party users. Recharging or refuelling points located on private properties, access to which is restricted to a limited, determinate circle of persons, such as parking lots in office buildings to which only employees or authorised persons have access, should not be considered as publicly accessible recharging or refuelling points.

Amendment  18

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 17 a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(17 a) In order to avoid any unintended consequences of this Regulation in discouraging the deployment of charging infrastructure for captive fleets such as public transport, publicly accessible recharging stations partially dedicated to public transport fleets, can be counted towards the relevant targets set out in this Regulation. Recharging points for car-sharing schemes should only be considered accessible to the public if they explicitly allow access for third party users.

Amendment  19

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 17 b (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(17 b) With a view to increase consumer convenience, Member States should encourage operators of publicly accessible recharging or refuelling points to ensure that the opening hours and uptime of their services fully meet the needs of end users.

Amendment  20

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 20

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(20) Smart metering systems as defined in Directive (EU) 2019/944 of the European Parliament and of the Council52 enable real-time data to be produced, which is needed to ensure the stability of the grid and to encourage rational use of recharging services. By providing energy metering in real time and accurate and transparent information on the cost, they encourage, in combination with smart recharging points, recharging at times of low general electricity demand and low energy prices. The use of smart metering systems in combination with smart recharging points can optimise recharging, with benefits for the electricity system and for the end user. Member States should encourage the use of smart metering system for the recharging of electric vehicles at publicly accessible recharging stations, where technically feasible and economically reasonable, and ensure that these systems comply with the requirements laid down in Article 20 of Directive (EU) 2019/444.

(20) Smart metering systems as defined in Directive (EU) 2019/944 of the European Parliament and of the Council52 enable real-time data to be produced, which is needed to ensure the stability of the grid and to encourage rational use of recharging services. By providing energy metering in real time and accurate and transparent information on the cost, they encourage, in combination with smart recharging points, recharging at times of low general electricity demand and low energy prices. The use of smart metering systems in combination with smart recharging points can optimise recharging, with benefits for the electricity system and for the end user. Member States should encourage the use of smart metering system for the recharging of electric vehicles at publicly accessible recharging stations, where technically feasible, and ensure that these systems comply with the requirements laid down in Article 20 of Directive (EU) 2019/444.

Amendment  21

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 21

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(21) The increasing number of electric vehicles in road, rail, maritime and other transport modes will require that recharging operations are optimised and managed in a way that does not cause congestion and takes full advantage of the availability of renewable electricity and low electricity prices in the system. Smart recharging in particular can facilitate the integration of electric vehicles into the electricity system further as it enables demand response through aggregation and through price based demand response. System integration can further be facilitated through bi-directional recharging (vehicle-to-grid). All normal recharging points at which vehicles are typically parked for a longer period should therefore support smart recharging.

(21) The increasing number of electric vehicles in road, rail, maritime and other transport modes will require that recharging operations are optimised and managed in a way that does not cause congestion and takes full advantage of the availability of renewable electricity and low electricity prices in the system. Smart recharging points, as well as off-grid recharging points, in particular, can facilitate the integration of electric vehicles into the electricity system and reduce the impact of electric vehicles on the electricity distribution network, as it enables demand response through aggregation and through price based demand response. System integration can further be facilitated through bi-directional recharging (vehicle-to-grid). All recharging points should therefore support smart recharging.

Amendment  22

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 21 a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(21 a) Bidirectional charging at both private and publicly accessible infrastructure could encourage people to purchase electric vehicles, as they can then be used for mobility as well as energy storage. Therefore, legislative hurdles such as double taxation should be prevented in order to further develop the business case of bidirectional charging and a sufficient number of private and publicly accessible charging stations should be made available for smart, bidirectional charging.

Justification

Sufficient availability of bidirectional charging (V2G) at private as well as publicly accessible infrastructure allows the vehicle owner to use his or her vehicle for both mobility as well as energy storage. It therefore incentivizes the uptake of electric vehicles and fosters sector integration.

Amendment  23

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 21 b (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(21 b) To ensure that the swift transformation towards e-mobility takes place in a sustainable way, the Union should take a global leadership role in sustainable products, technologies, services and innovations in particular concerning a circular, socially fair, environmentally responsible, and sustainable battery value chain, including job security and sustainability in the transition to zero and low emission road, maritime and air transport sector.

Amendment  24

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 22

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(22) The development of infrastructure for electric vehicles, the interaction of that infrastructure with the electricity system, and the rights and responsibilities assigned to the different actors in the electric mobility market, have to be consistent with the principles established under Directive (EU) 2019/944. In that sense, distribution system operators should cooperate on a non-discriminatory basis with any person establishing or operating publicly accessible recharging points and Member States should ensure that the electricity supply for a recharging point can be the subject of a contract with a supplier other than the entity supplying electricity to the household or premises where this recharging point is located. The access of Union electricity suppliers to recharging points should be without prejudice to the derogations under Article 66 of Directive (EU) 2019/944.

(22) The development of on-grid and off-grid infrastructure for electric vehicles, the interaction of that infrastructure with the electricity system, and the rights and responsibilities assigned to the different actors in the electric mobility market, have to be consistent with the principles established under Directive (EU) 2019/944. In that sense, distribution system operators should cooperate on a non-discriminatory basis with any person establishing or operating publicly accessible recharging points and Member States should ensure that the electricity supply for a recharging point can be the subject of a contract with a supplier other than the entity supplying electricity to the household or premises where this recharging point is located. The access of Union electricity suppliers to recharging points should be without prejudice to the derogations under Article 66 of Directive (EU) 2019/944.

Amendment  25

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 23

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(23) The establishment and operation of recharging points for electric vehicles should be developed as a competitive market with open access to all parties interested in rolling-out or operating recharging infrastructures. In view of the limited alternative locations on highways, existing highway concessions such as for conventional refuelling stations or rest areas are a particular cause for concern, since they can run over very long periods and sometimes even lack a specified end date altogether. Member States should seek, to the extent possible and in compliance with Directive (EU) 2014/23 of the European Parliament and of the Council53 , to competitively award new concessions specifically for recharging stations on or adjacent to existing highway rest areas in order to limit deployment cost and enable new market entrants.

(23) The establishment and operation of recharging points for electric vehicles should be developed as a competitive market with open access to all parties interested in rolling-out or operating recharging infrastructures. Therefore, Member States should prevent the emergence of dominant operators of charging infrastructure during the infrastructure development phase. Regional and local authorities support this objective by designating areas for competing operators. In view of the limited alternative locations for charging operators on highways, existing highway concessions such as for conventional refuelling stations or rest areas are a particular cause for concern, since they can run over very long periods and sometimes even lack a specified end date altogether. Member States should seek, to the extent possible and in compliance with Directive (EU) 2014/23 of the European Parliament and of the Council, to competitively award new concessions specifically for recharging stations on or adjacent to existing highway rest areas in order to prevent encroaching onto green spaces and to limit deployment cost and enable new market entrants. The possibility of setting up recharging points of competing operators at a highway rest area can also be considered.

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53 Directive 2014/23/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 26 February 2014 on the award of concession contracts (OJ L 94, 28.3.2014, p. 1).

53 Directive 2014/23/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 26 February 2014 on the award of concession contracts (OJ L 94, 28.3.2014, p. 1).

Amendment  26

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 23 a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(23 a) There is a wide range of funding sources available for Member States to support the deployment of alternative fuels infrastructure, in particular the Recovery and Resilience Facility established by Regulation (EU) 2021/2411a, the Commission’s Technical Support Instrument established by Regulation (EU) 2021/2401b, the Connecting Europe Facility established by Regulation (EU) 2021/11531c and Horizon Europe partnerships and missions, in particular the proposed Mission on Climate Neutral and Smart Cities, which aims to make 100 cities climate neutral by 2030. In addition, the European Regional Development Fund and the Cohesion Fund established by Regulation (EU) 2021/10581d are available to support investment in research, innovation and deployment, in particular in the less developed Member States and regions and the Invest EU programme, through its Sustainable Infrastructure window, can bolster future-proof investment across the European Union, help mobilise private investment and provide advisory services to project promoters and operators working in sustainable infrastructure and mobile assets. In recent years, the EIB Group has also ramped up its support to accelerate newer technologies such as e-mobility and digitalisation under the Cleaner Transport Facility, and the EIB is expected to continue providing a range of financing structures to help accelerate the deployment. Member States should tap into these financing possibilities, in particular to support public transport and active transport solutions and to finance measures designed to support citizens in energy and mobility poverty.

 

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1a Regulation (EU) 2021/241 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 12 February 2021 establishing the Recovery and Resilience Facility

 

1b Regulation (EU) 2021/240 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 10 February 2021 establishing a Technical Support Instrument

 

1c Regulation (EU) 2021/1153 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 7 July 2021 establishing the Connecting Europe Facility and repealing Regulations (EU) No 1316/2013 and (EU) No 283/2014

 

1d Regulation (EU) 2021/1058 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 24 June 2021 on the European Regional Development Fund and on the Cohesion Fund.

Amendment  27

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 24

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(24) Price transparency is crucial to ensure seamless and easy recharging and refuelling. Users of alternative fuel vehicles should be given accurate price information before the start of the recharging or refuelling service. The price should be communicated in a clearly structured manner to allow end users to identify the different cost components.

(24) Price transparency and affordability is crucial to ensure seamless and easy recharging and refuelling. Users of alternative fuel vehicles should be given accurate price information before the start of the recharging or refuelling service. The price should be communicated in a clearly structured manner, displaying, when applicable, the cost per kWh or per kg, to allow end users to identify, and to anticipate, the total cost of the recharging or refuelling operation.

Amendment  28

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 24 a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(24 a) The uptake of battery-electric and hydrogen vehicles will lead to a substantial change in recharging patterns which makes information on the availability of electric recharging points and refuelling stations essential for a seamless travel within the EU. To optimise the efficiency of both journey planning and recharging or refuelling, drivers should be given comprehensive information on the availability of specific recharging and refuelling points and expected waiting times. Therefore, Member States should encourage operators to offer information systems for end users. Such systems should be precise, user-friendly and operable in the official language(s) of the Member State and in English.

Amendment  29

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 25

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(25) New services emerge, particularly in support of the use of electric vehicles. Entities offering those services, such as mobility service providers, should be able to operate under fair market conditions. In particular, operators of recharging points should not give unduly preferential treatment to any of those service providers, for instance through unjustified price differentiation that may impede competition and ultimately lead to higher prices for consumers. The Commission should monitor the development of the recharging market. When reviewing the Regulation, the Commission will take actions where required by market developments such as limitations of services for end users or business practices that may limit competition.

(25) New services emerge, particularly in support of the use of electric vehicles. Entities offering those services, such as mobility service providers, should be able to operate under fair market conditions. In particular, operators of recharging points should not give unduly preferential treatment to any of those service providers, for instance through unjustified price differentiation that may impede competition and ultimately lead to higher prices for consumers. National regulatory authorities and the Commission should monitor the development of the recharging market. At the latest when reviewing the Regulation, the Commission will take actions where required by market developments such as limitations of services for end users or business practices that may limit competition.

Amendment  30

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 26

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(26) Hydrogen-powered motor vehicles have at present very low market penetration rates. However, a build-up of sufficient hydrogen refuelling infrastructure is essential in order to make large-scale hydrogen-powered motor vehicle deployment possible as envisaged in the Commission’s hydrogen strategy for a climate-neutral Europe54 . Currently, hydrogen refuelling points are only deployed in a few Member States and are largely not suitable for heavy-duty vehicles, not allowing for a circulation of hydrogen vehicles across the Union. Mandatory deployment targets for publicly accessible hydrogen refuelling points should ensure that a sufficiently dense network of hydrogen refuelling points is deployed across the TEN-T core network to allow for the seamless travel of hydrogen fuelled light-duty and heavy-duty vehicles throughout the Union.

(26) Hydrogen-powered motor vehicles have at present very low market penetration rates. However, a build-up of sufficient hydrogen refuelling infrastructure is essential in order to make large-scale hydrogen-powered motor vehicle deployment possible as envisaged in the Commission’s hydrogen strategy for a climate-neutral Europe54 . Currently, hydrogen refuelling points are only deployed in a few Member States and are largely not suitable for heavy-duty vehicles, not allowing for a circulation of hydrogen vehicles across the Union. Mandatory deployment targets for publicly accessible hydrogen refuelling points should ensure that a sufficiently dense network of hydrogen refuelling points is deployed across the TEN-T core network to allow for the seamless travel of hydrogen fuelled light-duty, heavy-duty vehicles and long-distance collective passenger transport throughout the Union.

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54 COM(2020) 301 final.

54 COM(2020) 301 final.

Amendment  31

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 27

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(27) Hydrogen fuelled vehicles should be able to refuel at or close to the destination, which is usually located in an urban area. To ensure that publicly accessible destination refuelling is possible at least in the main urban areas, all urban nodes as defined in Regulation (EU) No 1315/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council55 should provide such refuelling stations. Within the urban nodes, public authorities should consider to deploy the stations within multimodal freight centres as those are not only the typical destination for heavy-duty vehicles but could also serve hydrogen to other transport modes, such as rail and inland shipping.

(27) Hydrogen fuelled vehicles should be able to refuel at or close to the destination, which is usually located in an urban area. To ensure that publicly accessible destination refuelling is possible at least in the main urban areas, all urban nodes as defined in Regulation (EU) No 1315/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council55 should provide such refuelling stations. Within the urban nodes, public authorities should consider to deploy the stations within multimodal freight centres as those are not only the typical destination for heavy-duty vehicles but could also serve hydrogen to other transport modes, such as rail, inland shipping and long-distance collective passenger transport.

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55 Regulation (EU) No 1315/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 11 December 2013 on Union guidelines for the development of the trans-European transport network and repealing Decision No 661/2010/EU (OJ L 348, 20.12.2013, p. 1).

55 Regulation (EU) No 1315/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 11 December 2013 on Union guidelines for the development of the trans-European transport network and repealing Decision No 661/2010/EU (OJ L 348, 20.12.2013, p. 1).

Amendment  32

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 28

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(28) At the early stage of market deployment there is still a degree of uncertainty with regard to the kind of vehicles that will come into the market and to the kind of technologies that are going to be widely used. As outlined in the Commission’s communication ‘A hydrogen strategy for a climate-neutral Europe’56 the heavy-duty segment was identified as the most likely segment for the early mass deployment of hydrogen vehicles. Therefore, hydrogen refuelling infrastructure should preliminarily focus on that segment while also allowing light-duty vehicles to fuel at publicly accessible hydrogen refuelling stations. To ensure interoperability, all publicly accessible hydrogen stations should at least serve gaseous hydrogen at 700 bar. The infrastructure roll out should also take into account the emergence of new technologies, such as liquid hydrogen, that allow a larger range for heavy-duty vehicles and are the preferred technology choice of some vehicle manufacturers. To that end, a minimum number of hydrogen refuelling stations should serve also liquid hydrogen in addition to gaseous hydrogen at 700 bar.

(28) At the early stage of market deployment there is still uncertainty with regard to the kind of vehicles that will come into the market and to the kind of technologies that are going to be widely used. As outlined in the Commission’s communication ‘A hydrogen strategy for a climate-neutral Europe’56 the heavy-duty segment was identified as the most likely segment for the early mass deployment of hydrogen vehicles. Therefore, hydrogen refuelling infrastructure should preliminarily focus on that segment while also allowing light-duty vehicles to fuel at publicly accessible hydrogen refuelling stations. To ensure interoperability, all publicly accessible hydrogen stations should at least serve gaseous hydrogen at 700 bar. The infrastructure roll out should also take into account the emergence of new technologies, such as liquid hydrogen, that allow a larger range for heavy-duty vehicles and are the preferred technology choice of some vehicle manufacturers. To that end, a minimum number of hydrogen refuelling stations should serve also liquid hydrogen in addition to gaseous hydrogen at 700 bar.

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56 COM(2020) 301 final

56 COM(2020) 301 final

Amendment  33

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 28 a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(28 a) It is important to support the effective rollout in Member States of the hydrogen refuelling infrastructure that is foreseen. This will require coordination amongst all stakeholders, including by European, national, and regional institutions, trade unions, and the industry. Initiatives, such as the Clean Hydrogen Joint Undertaking, set up by Council Regulation (EU) 2021/2085, should also be used with a view to facilitating and leveraging private funding so that it reaches the relevant targets identified in this Regulation.

Amendment  34

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 30

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(30) Users of alternative fuel vehicles should be able to pay easily and conveniently at all publicly accessible recharging and refuelling points, without the need to enter into a contract with the operator of the recharging or refuelling point or a mobility service provider. Therefore, for recharging or refuelling on an ad hoc basis, all publicly accessible recharging and refuelling points should accept payment instruments that are widely used in the Union, and in particular electronic payments through terminals and devices used for payment services. That ad hoc payment method should always be available to consumers, even when contract-based payments are offered at the recharging or refuelling point.

(30) Users of alternative fuel vehicles should be able to pay easily and conveniently at all publicly accessible recharging and refuelling points, without the need to enter into a contract with the operator of the recharging or refuelling point or a mobility service provider. Therefore, for recharging or refuelling on an ad hoc basis, all publicly accessible recharging and refuelling points should accept electronic card payment or devices with a contactless functionality that is at least able to read payment cards, and if possible also additional payment instruments that are widely used in the Union. That ad hoc payment method should always be available to consumers, even when contract-based payments are offered at the recharging or refuelling point. In order to guarantee consumer friendly and seamless payments at charging and refuelling stations, the Commission should be encouraged to amend Directive (EU) 2015/2366 to guarantee that contactless payment by card is possible at charging and refuelling stations.

Amendment  35

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 30 a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(30 a) To ensure that recharging infrastructure is used efficiently and improves reliability and consumer confidence in e-mobility, it is essential to ensure that the use of publicly accessible recharging stations are accessible to all users, regardless of the automobile brand, in a user friendly and non-discriminatory way.

Amendment  36

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 31

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(31) Transport infrastructure should allow seamless mobility and accessibility for all users, including persons with disabilities and older persons. In principle, the location of all recharging and refuelling stations as well as the recharging and refuelling stations themselves should be designed in such a way that they can be used by as much of the public as possible, in particular by older persons, persons with reduced mobility and persons with disabilities. This should include for example providing sufficient space around the parking lot, ensuring that the recharging station is not installed on a kerbed surface, ensuring that the buttons or screen of the recharging station are at an appropriate height and the weight of the recharging and refuelling cables is such that persons with limited strength can handle them with ease. In addition the user interface of the related recharging stations should be accessible. In that sense, the accessibility requirements in Annexes I and III to Directive 2019/88257 should be applicable to recharging and refuelling infrastructure.

(31) Transport infrastructure should allow seamless mobility and accessibility for all users, including persons with disabilities and older persons. The location of all recharging and refuelling stations as well as the recharging and refuelling stations themselves should be designed in such a way that they can be accessible and user-friendly for all of the public, in particular by older persons, persons with reduced mobility and persons with disabilities. This should include for example providing sufficient space around the parking lot, ensuring that the recharging station is not installed on a kerbed surface, ensuring that the buttons or screen of the recharging station are at an appropriate height and the weight of the recharging and refuelling cables is such that persons with limited strength can handle them with ease. In addition the user interface of the related recharging stations should be accessible. In that sense, the accessibility requirements in Annexes I and III to Directive 2019/88257 should be applicable to recharging and refuelling infrastructure.

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57 Directive (EU) 2019/882 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 17 April 2019 on the accessibility requirements for products and services (OJ L 151, 7.6.2019, p. 70).

57 Directive (EU) 2019/882 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 17 April 2019 on the accessibility requirements for products and services (OJ L 151, 7.6.2019, p. 70).

Amendment  37

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 32

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(32) Shore-side electricity facilities can serve maritime and inland waterway transport as clean power supply and contribute to reducing the environmental impact of seagoing ships and inland waterway vessels. Under the FuelEU maritime initiative, ship operators of container and passenger ships need to comply with provisions to reduce emissions at berth. Mandatory deployment targets should ensure that the sector finds sufficient shore-side electricity supply in TEN-T core and comprehensive maritime ports to comply with those requirements. The application of these targets to all TEN-T maritime ports should ensure the level playing field between ports.

(32) Shore-side electricity facilities, either fixed or mobile, can serve maritime and inland waterway transport as clean power supply and contribute to reducing the environmental impact of seagoing ships and inland waterway vessels. The public health and climate benefits of using onshore-power supply over other options are prominent in terms of air quality for urban areas surrounding ports. Under the FuelEU maritime initiative, ship operators of container and passenger ships need to comply with provisions to reduce emissions at berth. Mandatory deployment targets should ensure that the sector finds sufficient shore-side electricity supply in TEN-T core and comprehensive maritime ports to comply with those requirements. As there are diverse governance frameworks regulating maritime ports in the Union, Member States may decide that the infrastructure is deployed in the relevant terminals with the highest amount of port calls for each individual ship type, in order to reach those targets. The application of these targets to all TEN-T maritime ports should ensure the level playing field between ports. Given the costs and complexity related to the roll-out of shore-side electricity in maritime ports, it is essential to prioritise investments within ports and, where relevant, between terminals, where they make the most sense in terms of utilisation, economic viability, reductions of greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution, and grid capacity. Or.

Amendment  38

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 32 a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(32 a) Member States should take all necessary steps to ensure sufficient frequency conversion, power reserve and that the electricity grid is sufficiently extended, in connectivity and capacity, to ensure that enough shore-side electricity supply is provided to meet the power demands resulting from the provision of shore-side electricity in ports, as required in this Regulation. To ensure continuity, Member States should upgrade and maintain the grid so that it is able to handle present and future increased demand of shore-side electricity services in ports. In case it is impossible to supply sufficient shore-side electricity due to weak capacity in the local grid connecting to the port, this should be rectified by the Member State and not be considered as a failure by the port nor of the ship owner or operator to comply with the requirements of this Regulation, as long as the insufficient local grid capacity is duly attested by the grid manager.

Amendment  39

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 32 b (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(32 b) The development and deployment of alternative fuels for the maritime sector requires a coordinated approach to match supply and demand and avoid stranded assets. Therefore, all relevant public and private actors should be involved in the roll-out of alternative fuels and notably of shore-side electricity, including but not limited to relevant authorities at local, regional and national level, port authorities, terminal operators, grid operators, onshore power supply operators, ship-owners and other relevant maritime market actors.

Amendment  40

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 32 c (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(32 c) In order to ensure a coherent legislative framework for the use and deployment of alternative fuels, this Regulation should be aligned with Regulation XXXX-XXX [FuelEU Maritime] and Directive 2003/96/EC [Energy Taxation Directive]. This alignment should ensure that the provisions on onshore power supply in ports is accompanied by rules mandating the use of shore-side electricity by ships and by rules incentivising its use through a tax exemption.

Amendment  41

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 32 d (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(32 d) The prioritisation of certain segments of shipping for the provision and use of shore-side electricity to lower emissions at berth should not exempt other segments from contributing to the climate and zero pollution goals. Therefore, as part of the review of this Regulation, the Commission should assess extending the provisions relating to minimum shore-side electricity supply in TEN-T core and comprehensive maritime ports to include also smaller ships and additional ship types. The Commission should in particular consider the availability of relevant data, the potential reduction in greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution, the technological development and the effectiveness of a widening of the scope in terms of climate and health benefits, the scale of administrative burden as well as financial and social consequences thereof. In addition, the Commission should assess extending the provisions to allow for infrastructure that would supply shore-side electricity to vessels at anchorage within a port area;

Amendment  42

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 32 e (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(32 e) It is important to avoid stranded assets and make sure that the public and private investments that are made today are future proof and contributing to the climate neutral pathway as set out by the European Green Deal. The deployment of shore-side electricity in maritime ports has to be seen together with the current and future deployment of equivalent alternative zero-greenhouse gas emission and zero-pollutants technologies, in particular those technologies that deliver emission and pollutants reductions both at berth and during navigation.

Amendment  43

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 34

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(34) These targets should take into account the types of vessels served and their respective traffic volumes. Maritime ports with low traffic volumes of certain ship categories, should be exempted from the mandatory requirements for the corresponding ship categories based on a minimum level of traffic volume, so as to avoid underused capacity being installed. Similarly, the mandatory targets should not aim to target maximum demand, but a sufficiently high volume, in order to avoid underused capacity and to take account of port operational characteristics. Maritime transport is an important link for the cohesion and economic development of islands in the Union. Energy production capacity in these islands may not always be sufficient to account for the power demand required to support the provision of shore-side electricity supply. In such a case islands should be exempted from this requirement unless and until such an electrical connection with the mainland has been completed or there is a sufficient locally generated capacity from clean energy sources.

(34) These targets should take into account the types of vessels served and their respective traffic volumes. Maritime ports with low traffic volumes of certain ship categories, should be exempted from the mandatory requirements for the corresponding ship categories based on a minimum level of traffic volume, so as to avoid underused capacity being installed. Similarly, the mandatory targets should not aim to target maximum demand, but a sufficiently high volume, in order to avoid underused capacity and to take account of port operational characteristics. Maritime transport is an important link for the cohesion and economic development of islands in the Union, as well as of the outermost regions, for which maritime transport is used for the purposes of tourism activities. Their energy production capacity may not always be sufficient to account for the power demand required to support the provision of shore-side electricity supply. In such a case these territories should be exempted from this requirement unless and until such an electrical connection with the mainland has been completed or there is a sufficient locally generated capacity from clean energy sources.

Amendment  44

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 35

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(35) A core network of refuelling points for LNG at maritime ports should be available by 2025. Refuelling points for LNG include LNG terminals, tanks, mobile containers, bunker vessels and barges.

(35) A core network of refuelling points for LNG, hydrogen and ammonia at maritime ports should be available by 2025. The deployment of LNG infrastructure, due to the fuel´s transitional role, should be driven by market demand, to avoid stranded assets and underused capacity. Refuelling points for LNG include LNG terminals, tanks, mobile containers, bunker vessels and barges.

Amendment  45

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 36

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(36) Electricity supply to stationary aircraft at airports should replace the consumption of liquid fuel with a cleaner power source by aircraft (use of Auxiliary Power Unit) or ground power units (GPUs). This should reduce pollutant and noise emissions, improve air quality and reduce the impact on climate change. Therefore, all commercial transport operation should be able to make use of external electricity supply while parked at gates or at outfield positions at TEN-T airports.

(36) Electricity supply to stationary aircraft at airports should replace the consumption of liquid fuel with a cleaner power source by aircraft (use of Auxiliary Power Unit) or ground power units (GPUs). Therefore, all commercial transport operations covered under the scope of this Regulation should make use of external electricity supply while parked at gates or at outfield positions at airports. Additionally, in order for commercial passenger aircraft to completely turn off their engines while parked, pre-conditioned air (PCA) systems in in TEN-T core airports should be taken into account. This would reduce pollutant and noise emissions, improve air quality and reduce the impact on climate change. Therefore, all commercial transport operation should be able to make use of external electricity supply and pre-conditioned air systems while parked at gates or at outfield positions at TEN-T airports.

Amendment  46

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 37

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(37) In accordance with Article 3 of Directive 2014/94/EU, Member States have established national policy frameworks outlining their plans and objectives to ensure that those objectives would be met. Both the assessment of the national policy framework and the evaluation of Directive 2014/94/EU have highlighted the need for higher ambition and a better coordinated approach across Member States in view of the expected acceleration in the uptake of alternative fuel vehicles, in particular of electric vehicles. Furthermore, alternatives to fossil fuel will be needed in all transport modes to meet the ambitions of the European Green Deal. The existing National Policy Frameworks should be revised to clearly describe how the much greater need for publicly accessible recharging and refuelling infrastructure as expressed in the mandatory targets is going to be met by the Member States. The revised frameworks should equally address all transport modes including those for which no mandatory deployment targets exists.

(37) In accordance with Article 3 of Directive 2014/94/EU, Member States have established national policy frameworks outlining their plans and objectives to ensure that those objectives would be met. Both the assessment of the national policy framework and the evaluation of Directive 2014/94/EU have highlighted the need for higher ambition and a better coordinated approach across Member States in view of the expected acceleration in the uptake of alternative fuel vehicles, in particular of electric vehicles. Furthermore, fossil fuels should be phased out and sustainable alternatives will be needed in all transport modes to meet the ambitions of the European Green Deal and the Union climate objectives. The existing National Policy Frameworks should be revised to clearly describe how the much greater need for publicly accessible recharging and refuelling infrastructure as expressed in the mandatory targets is going to be met by the Member States. The national policy frameworks should be based on territorial analysis, identifying the different needs and taking into account, when relevant, existing regional and local deployment plans of recharging and refuelling infrastructure. Attention should be paid to rural areas in order to ensure full accessibility to such infrastructure. Furthermore, the revised frameworks should equally address all transport modes including those for which no mandatory deployment targets exists.

Amendment  47

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 38

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(38) The revised national policy frameworks should include supporting actions for the development of the market as regards alternative fuels, including the deployment of the necessary infrastructure to be put into place, in close cooperation with regional and local authorities and with the industry concerned, while taking into account the needs of small and medium-sized enterprises. Additionally, the revised frameworks should describe the overall national framework for planning, permitting and procuring of such infrastructure, including the identified obstacles and actions to remove them so shat a faster rollout of infrastructure can be achieved.

(38) The revised national policy frameworks should be aligned with the Union climate objectives and include detailed market and traffic shares, especially for transit traffic, data monitoring and evaluation on a frequent basis, providing for market projections and supporting actions for the development of the market as regards alternative fuels, including the deployment of the necessary infrastructure to be put into place, in close cooperation with regional and local authorities and with the industry concerned, while taking into account the needs of ensuring a socially just transition and of small and medium-sized enterprises. Additionally, the revised frameworks should describe the overall national framework for planning, permitting and procuring of such infrastructure, including the identified obstacles and actions to remove them so shat a faster rollout of infrastructure can be achieved. The revised national policy frameworks should take into utmost account the 'energy efficiency first' principle. Member States should consider the recently released Recommendation and Guidelines on the implementation of the principle, which explain how planning, policy and investment decisions can reduce energy consumption in a number of key sectors, including transport.

Amendment  48

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 39

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(39) The development and implementation of the revised national policy frameworks of the Member States should be facilitated by the Commission by means of exchanges of information and best practices between the Member States.

(39) The development and implementation of the revised national policy frameworks of the Member States should be facilitated by the Commission by means of exchanges of information and best practices between the Member States and regional and local authorities.

Amendment  49

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 40

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(40) In order to promote alternative fuels and develop the relevant infrastructure, the national policy frameworks should consist of detailed strategies to promote alternative fuels in sectors that are difficult to decarbonise such as aviation, maritime transport, inland waterway transport as well as rail transport on network segments that cannot be electrified. In particular, Member States should develop clear strategies for the decarbonisation of inland waterway transport along the TEN-T network in close cooperation with those Member States concerned. Long term decarbonisation strategies should also be developed for TEN-T ports and TEN-T airports, in particular with a focus on the deployment of infrastructure for low and zero emission vessels and aircraft as well as for railway lines that are not going to be electrified. On the basis of those strategies the Commission should review this Regulation with a view to setting more mandatory targets for those sectors.

(40) In order to promote alternative fuels and develop the relevant infrastructure, the national policy frameworks should consist of detailed strategies to promote alternative fuels in sectors that are difficult to decarbonise, such as aviation, maritime transport and inland waterway transport, as well as rail transport on network segments that cannot be electrified. In particular, Member States should develop clear strategies for the decarbonisation of inland waterway transport along the TEN-T network in close cooperation with those Member States concerned. Long term decarbonisation strategies should also be developed for TEN-T ports and TEN-T airports, in particular with a focus on the deployment of infrastructure for low and zero emission vessels and aircraft as well as for railway lines that are not going to be electrified. On the basis of those strategies, and taking into consideration the national market and traffic share data and market projections, the Commission should review this Regulation with a view to setting more mandatory targets for those sectors.

Amendment  50

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 40 a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(40 a) While only around only 56% of the existing European rail network is electrified, electricity-powered trains make up more than 80 % of total travelled train-kilometres. However, there are still an estimated 6,000 diesel trains in service today. Since they are dependent on fossil fuels, they generate greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution. The further deployment of alternative fuels infrastructure in the rail sector is therefore necessary and urgent to ensure a shift away from fossil fuel powered trains, and thereby to ensure that all transport sectors play their role in shifting towards a climate neutral economy. Consequently, it is appropriate for this Regulation to lay down concrete targets are proposed under this Regulation. Different technologies are available to the rail sector to shift away from diesel trains, including direct electrification, battery powered trains and hydrogen applications, where direct electrification of a segment is not possible for reasons of cost-efficiency of the service. The development of these technologies requires the deployment of suitable recharging and refuelling infrastructure in Member States. Before their deployment, Member States should carefully assess the best locations for such infrastructure, and should, in particular, consider deployment in multimodal hubs and urban nodes. The ‘energy efficiency first’ principle should be fully taken into account in planning and investment decisions.

Amendment  51

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 41

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(41) Member States should make use of a wide range of regulatory and non-regulatory incentives and measures to reach the mandatory targets and implement their national policy frameworks, in close cooperation with private sector actors, who should play a key role in supporting the development of alternative fuels infrastructure.

(41) Member States should make use of a wide range of market-based and regulatory incentives and measures to reach the mandatory targets and implement their national policy frameworks, in close cooperation with regional and local authorities, as well as private sector actors, who should play a key role in supporting and financing the development of alternative fuels infrastructure.

Amendment  52

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 41 b (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(41 b) Member States should introduce incentive schemes and should take all necessary measures when seeking to promote sustainable modes of transport. Particular emphasis should be placed on the role of municipal or regional authorities, which can facilitate the uptake of vehicles using alternative fuels through dedicated tax incentives, public procurements or local traffic regulations.

Amendment  53

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 42

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(42) Pursuant to Directive 2009/33/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council58 , minimum national shares of public procurement are reserved for clean and zero-emission buses, where a clean bus uses alternative fuels as defined in Article 2, point (3) of this Regulation. With ever more public transport authorities and operators switching to clean and zero-emission buses in order to reach those targets, Member States should include the targeted promotion and development of the necessary bus infrastructure as a key element in their National Policy Frameworks. Member States should establish and maintain appropriate instruments to promote the deployment of charging and refuelling infrastructure also for captive fleets, in particular for clean and zero-emission buses at local level.

(42) Pursuant to Directive 2009/33/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council58 , minimum national shares of public procurement are reserved for clean and zero-emission buses, where a clean bus uses alternative fuels as defined in Article 2, point (3) of this Regulation. With ever more public transport authorities and operators switching to clean and zero-emission buses in order to reach those targets, Member States should include the targeted promotion and development of the necessary bus infrastructure as a key element in their National Policy Frameworks. Member States should establish and maintain appropriate instruments to promote the deployment of charging and refuelling infrastructure also for captive fleets, in particular for zero-emission buses, coaches and for car sharing along roads and should be able to count such deployment towards the targets set out in this Regulation.

__________________

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58 Directive 2009/33/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 23 April 2009 on the promotion of clean and energy-efficient road transport vehicles (OJ L 120, 15.5.2009, p. 5).

58 Directive 2009/33/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 23 April 2009 on the promotion of clean and energy-efficient road transport vehicles (OJ L 120, 15.5.2009, p. 5).

Amendment  54

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 43

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(43) In light of the increasing diversity in the type of fuels for motorised vehicles coupled with on-going growth in the road mobility of citizens across the Union, it is necessary to provide vehicle users with clear and easy-to-understand information on the fuels available at refuelling stations and on the compatibility of their vehicle with different fuels or recharging points on the Union market. Member States should be able to decide to implement such information measures also in respect of vehicles placed on the market before 18 November 2016.

(43) In light of the increasing diversity in the type of fuels for motorised vehicles coupled with on-going growth in the road mobility of citizens across the Union, it is necessary to provide vehicle users with clear and easy-to-understand information on the fuels available at refuelling stations and on the compatibility of their vehicle with different fuels or recharging points on the Union market. Member States should be able to decide to implement such information measures also in respect of vehicles previously placed on the market.

Amendment  55

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 44

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(44) Simple and easy-to-compare information on the prices of different fuels could play an important role in enabling vehicle users to better evaluate the relative cost of individual fuels available on the market. Therefore, a unit price comparison of certain alternative fuels and conventional fuels, expressed as ‘fuel price per 100km’, should be displayed for information purposes at all relevant fuel stations.

(44) Simple and easy-to-compare information on the prices of different fuels could play an important role in enabling vehicle users to better evaluate the relative cost of individual fuels available on the market. Therefore, a unit price comparison of certain alternative fuels and conventional fuels, expressed as ‘fuel price per 100km’ should be displayed for information purposes at all relevant fuel stations. It should be made clear to consumers that this price comparison concerns the average fuel prices in the Member State, which may differ from the actual prices charged at the fuel station in question. Moreover, for ad hoc recharging of electricity and refuelling of hydrogen, the price charged at the station in question should also be provided per kWh and per kg, respectively.

Amendment  56

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 46

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(46) Data should play a fundamental role in the adequate functioning of recharging and refuelling infrastructure. The format, the frequency and the quality in which these data should be made available and accessible should determine the overall quality of an alternative fuels infrastructure ecosystem that meets user needs. Moreover, those data should be accessible in a coherent manner in all Member States. Therefore, data should be provided in accordance with the requirements set in Directive 2010/40/EU of the European Parliament and the Council59 for national access points (NAPs).

(46) Data should play a fundamental role in the adequate functioning of recharging and refuelling infrastructure. The format, the frequency and the quality in which these data should be made available and accessible should determine the overall quality of an alternative fuels infrastructure ecosystem that meets user needs. Moreover, those data should be accessible in a coherent manner in all Member States. Therefore, data should be provided as open data in accordance with the requirements set in Directive 2010/40/EU of the European Parliament and the Council59 for national access points (NAPs). For services allowing seamless travel across the Union, a Union wide system should also be created, importing standardised information from national systems. Therefore, the Commission should establish a common European access point at Union level, to function as a data gateway for end users and mobility service providers to easily access the relevant data retained in the National Access Points. It should, when possible, be compatible and interoperable with existing information and reservation systems developed by Member States. The European access point could facilitate better price comparisons for consumers between publicly accessible recharging and refuelling operators on the internal market and provide users with information on the accessibility and availability, waiting times and the remaining alternative fuels capacity of the refuelling and recharging points. This could help preventing traffic disruption and benefit road safety. This information should be made available through a public, up-to-date, user-friendly, accessible and multilingual interface at EU level.

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59 Directive 2010/40/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 7 July 2010 on the framework for the deployment of Intelligent Transport Systems in the field of road transport and for interfaces with other modes of transport (OJ L 207, 6.8.2010, p. 1).

59 Directive 2010/40/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 7 July 2010 on the framework for the deployment of Intelligent Transport Systems in the field of road transport and for interfaces with other modes of transport (OJ L 207, 6.8.2010, p. 1).

Amendment  57

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 52

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(52) In the application of this Regulation, the Commission should consult relevant expert groups, and in particular the Sustainable Transport Forum (‘STF’) and the European Sustainable Shipping Forum (‘ESSF’). Such expert consultation is of particular importance when the Commission intends to adopt delegated or implementing acts under this Regulation.

(52) In the application of this Regulation, the Commission should consult a broad range of organisations and stakeholders, including but not limited to consumers groups, municipalities, cities and regions, as well as relevant expert groups, in particular the Sustainable Transport Forum (‘STF’) and the European Sustainable Shipping Forum (‘ESSF’). Such expert consultation is of particular importance when the Commission intends to adopt delegated or implementing acts under this Regulation.

Amendment  58

 

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 53

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(53) Alternative fuels infrastructure is a fast developing area. The lack of common technical specification constitutes a barrier for the creation of a single market of alternative fuels infrastructure. Therefore, the power to adopt acts in accordance with Article 290 TFEU should be delegated to the Commission to norm technical specifications for areas where common technical specifications are outstanding but necessary. In particular, this should include the communication between the electric vehicle and the recharging point, the communication between the recharging point and the recharging software management system (back-end); the communication related to the electric vehicle roaming service and the communication with the electricity grid. It is also necessary to define the suitable governance framework and roles of the different actors involved in the vehicle-to-grid communication ecosystem. Moreover, emerging technological developments, such as electric road systems (‘ERS’) have to be accounted for. As concerns data provision, it is necessary to provide for additional data types and technical specifications related to the format, the frequency and the quality in which these data should be made available and accessible.

(53) Alternative fuels infrastructure is a fast developing area. The lack of common technical specification constitutes a barrier for the creation of a single market of alternative fuels infrastructure. Therefore, the power to adopt acts in accordance with Article 290 TFEU should be delegated to the Commission to norm technical specifications for areas where common technical specifications are outstanding but necessary. In particular, this should include the communication between the electric vehicle and the recharging point, the communication between the recharging point and the recharging software management system (back-end); the communication related to the electric vehicle roaming service and the communication with the electricity grid, while ensuring a high level of cybersecurity and consumer data protection. It is also necessary to swiftly define the suitable governance framework and roles of the different actors involved in the vehicle-to-grid communication ecosystem while taking into account and supporting emerging technological developments with high GHG emission reduction potential, such as electric road systems (‘ERS’), notably inductive and overhead catenary line charging solutions. As concerns data provision, it is necessary to provide for additional data types and technical specifications related to the format, the frequency and the quality in which these data should be made available and accessible. It is of particular importance that the Commission carry out appropriate consultations during its preparatory work, including at expert level, and that those consultations be conducted in accordance with the principles laid down in the Interinstitutional Agreement of 13 April 2016 on Better Law-Making. In particular, to ensure equal participation in the preparation of delegated acts, the European Parliament and the Council receive all documents at the same time as Member States’ experts, and their experts systematically have access to meetings of Commission expert groups dealing with the preparation of delegated acts.

Amendment  59

Proposal for a regulation

Recital 54 a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(54 a) Given that this Regulation will generate additional compliance costs for affected sectors, compensatory actions need to be taken in order to prevent the total level of regulatory burdens from increasing. The Commission should therefore be obliged to present, before the entry into force of this Regulation, proposals offsetting the regulatory burdens introduced by this Regulation, through the revision or abolishment of provisions in other EU Regulations that generate unnecessary compliance costs in the affected sectors.

Amendment  60

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 1 – paragraph 1

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

1. This Regulation sets out mandatory national targets for the deployment of sufficient alternative fuels infrastructure in the Union, for road vehicles, vessels and stationary aircraft. It lays down common technical specifications and requirements on user information, data provision and payment requirements for alternative fuels infrastructure.

1. This Regulation sets out minimum national targets for the deployment of sufficient alternative fuels infrastructure in the Union, for road vehicles, vessels, trains and stationary aircraft. It lays down common technical specifications and requirements on user information, data provision and payment requirements for alternative fuels infrastructure.

Amendment  61

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 1 – paragraph 3

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

3. This Regulation establishes a reporting mechanism to stimulate cooperation and ensures a robust tracking of progress. The mechanism shall comprise a structured, transparent, iterative process between the Commission and Member States for the purpose of the finalisation of the national policy frameworks and their subsequent implementation and corresponding Commission action.

3. This Regulation establishes a reporting mechanism to stimulate cooperation and ensures a robust tracking of progress. The mechanism shall comprise a structured, transparent, iterative and multi-level governance process between the Commission, and the Member States, and regional and local authorities for the purpose of the finalisation of the national policy frameworks, taking into account existing local and regional strategies for the deployment of alternative fuels infrastructure, and their subsequent implementation and corresponding Commission action.

Amendment  62

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 2 a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(2 a) along the TEN-T network' means, when used in respect of electric recharging stations and hydrogen refuelling stations, that they are located on the TEN-T network or within 1.5 km driving distance from the nearest exit of a TEN-T road;

Amendment  63

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 3 – point a – introductory part

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(a) ‘alternative fuels for zero-emission vehicles’:

(a) ‘alternative fuels for zero-emission vehicles, vessels and aircraft’:

Amendment  64

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 3 – point b – indent 1

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 biomass fuels and biofuels as defined in Article 2, points (27) and (33) of Directive (EU) 2018/2001,

 biomass fuels, including biogas, and biofuels as defined in Article 2, points (27), (28) and (33) of Directive (EU) 2018/2001,

Amendment  65

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 3 – point c – introductory part

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(c) ‘alternative fossil fuels’ for a transitional phase:

(c) ‘alternative fossil fuels’ for a limited transitional phase:

Amendment  66

Proposal for a regulation

Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 9 a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(9 a) ‘citizen energy community’ means a community as defined in Article 2(11) of Directive (EU)2019/944

Amendment  67

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 17

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(17) ‘electric road system’ means a physical installation along a road that allows for the transfer of electricity to an electric vehicle while the vehicle is in motion;

(17) ‘electric road system’ means a physical installation along a road that allows for the transfer of electricity to an electric vehicle to provide it the energy necessary for propulsion, or for dynamic charging;

Amendment  68

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 17 a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(17 a) 'dynamic charging' means the charging of an electric vehicle battery while the vehicle is in motion;

Amendment  69

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 19 a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(19 a) ’energy efficiency first’ means ‘energy efficiency first’ as defined in of Article 2, point (18) of Regulation (EU) 2018/1999;

Amendment  70

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 19 b (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(19 b) ’technological neutrality’ means ‘technological neutrality’ as laid down in Recital 25 of Directive (EU) 2018/1972;

Amendment  71

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 35 a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(35 a) 'payment card' means a payment service that works on the basis of a physical and digital debit or credit card and comprises payment cards embedded in a smartphone application;

Amendment  72

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 35 b (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(35 b) 'payment service' means a 'payment service' as defined in Article 4, point (3), of Directive (EU) 2015/2366;

Amendment  73

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 37 a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(37 a) ‘preconditioned air system’ means a fixed or mobile system at airports providing the external supply of conditioned air to cool, ventilate or heat the cabins of stationary aircraft;

Amendment  74

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 38

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(38) ‘publicly accessible’ alternative fuels infrastructure, means an alternative fuels infrastructure which is located at a site or premise that is open to the general public, irrespective of whether the alternative fuels infrastructure is located on public or on private property, whether limitations or conditions apply in terms of access to the site or premise and irrespective of the applicable use conditions of the alternative fuels infrastructure;

(38) ‘publicly accessible’ alternative fuels infrastructure, means an alternative fuels infrastructure which is located at a site or premise that is open to the general public, including persons with reduced mobility, irrespective of whether the alternative fuels infrastructure is located on public or on private property, whether limitations or conditions apply in terms of access to the site or premise and irrespective of the applicable use conditions of the alternative fuels infrastructure.

Amendment  75

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 40

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(40) ‘recharge on an ad hoc basis’ means a recharging service purchased by an end user without the need for that end user to register, conclude a written agreement, or enter into a longer-lasting commercial relationship with the operator of that recharging point beyond the mere purchase of the service;

(40) ‘recharge on an ad hoc basis’ means a recharging service purchased by an end user without the need for that end user to register, conclude a written agreement, or enter into a longer-lasting commercial relationship with the operator of that recharging point or to electronically log-in or sign-in to online intermediation services, beyond the mere purchase of the service;

Amendment  76

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 41

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(41) ‘recharging point’ means a fixed or mobile interface that allows for the transfer of electricity to an electric vehicle, which, whilst it may have one or several connectors to accommodate different connector types, is capable of recharging only one electric vehicle at a time, and excludes devices with a power output less than or equal to 3,7 kW the primary purpose of which is not recharging electric vehicles.

(41) ‘recharging point’ means a fixed or mobile, on-grid or off-grid interface that allows for the transfer of electricity to an electric vehicle, which, whilst it may have one or several connectors to accommodate different connector types, is capable of recharging only one electric vehicle at a time, and excludes devices with a power output less than or equal to 3,7 kW the primary purpose of which is not recharging electric vehicles.

Amendment  77

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 49

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(49) ‘refuelling point’ means a refuelling facility for the provision of any liquid or gaseous alternative fuel, through a fixed or a mobile installation, which is capable of refuelling only one vehicle at a time;

(49) ‘refuelling point’ means a refuelling facility for the provision of any liquid or gaseous alternative fuel, through a fixed or a mobile installation, which is capable of refuelling only one vehicle or one vessel at a time;

Amendment  78

Proposal for a regulation

Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 54 a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(54 a) ‘renewable energy community’ means a community as defined in Article2 (16) of Directive(EU) 2018/2001;

Amendment  79

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 56

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(56) ‘safe and secure parking’ means a parking and rest area as referenced in Article 17, point(1)(b) that is dedicated to heavy-duty vehicles overnight parking;

(56) ‘safe and secure parking’ means a parking and rest area as referred to in Article 17, point(1)(b) of Regulation (EU) No 1315/2013, that is dedicated to heavy-duty vehicles overnight parking and has been certified pursuant to the provisions in Article 8a of Regulation (EC) No 561/2006;

Amendment  80

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 57

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(57) ‘ship at berth’ means ship at berth as defined in Article 3, point (n) of Regulation (EU) 2015/757;

(57) ‘ship at berth’ means a ship which is securely moored at the quayside in a port falling under the jurisdiction of a Member State while it is loading, unloading, embarking or disembarking passengers or hotelling, including the time spent when not engaged in cargo or passenger operations;

Amendment  81

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 58

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(58) ‘shore-side electricity supply’ means the provision of shore-side electrical power through a standardised interface to seagoing ships or inland waterway vessels at berth;

(58) ‘shore-side electricity supply’ means the provision of shore-side electrical power through a standardised fixed, floating or mobile installation to seagoing ships or inland waterway vessels at berth;

Amendment  82

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 66 a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(66 a) 'multimodal hub' means a mobility service infrastructure, such as rail, road, air, maritime and inland waterways stations and terminals, that allows for the performance of 'multimodal transport’ defined in Article 3, point (n) of Regulation (EU) No 1315/2013;

Amendment  83

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 66 b (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(66 b) 'L-category vehicles’ means powered two-, three- and four-wheel vehicles as categorised in Regulation (EU) No 168/2013 and Annex I, including powered cycles, two- and three-wheel mopeds, two- and three-wheel motorcycles, motorcycles with side-cars, light and heavy on-road quads, and light and heavy quadri-mobiles.

Amendment  84

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 3 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 1 – indent 2

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 in their territory, publicly accessible recharging stations dedicated to light-duty vehicles are deployed that provide sufficient power output for those vehicles.

 in their territory, publicly accessible recharging stations dedicated to light-duty vehicles are deployed in a manner that supports territorial balance and multimodal travelling that provide sufficient power output for those vehicles;

Amendment  85

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 3 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 1 – indent 2 a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

- a sufficient number of publicly accessible recharging stations for light-duty vehicles is deployed on public roads in residential areas where vehicles typically park for extended periods of time;

Amendment  86

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 3 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 1 – indent 2 b (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

- a sufficient number of publicly accessible recharging stations for light-duty vehicles is enabled for smart and bi-directional charging;

Amendment  87

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 3 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 1 – indent 2 c (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

- the grid connection and the grid capacity are provided.

Amendment  88

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 3 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 2 – point a

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(a) for each battery electric light-duty vehicle registered in their territory, a total power output of at least 1 kW is provided through publicly accessible recharging stations; and

(a) for each battery electric light-duty vehicle registered in their territory, a total power output of at least 3 kW is provided, through publicly accessible recharging stations, if the share of the total projected light-duty vehicle fleet represented by battery electric light-duty vehicles in that Member State is less than 1%;

Amendment  89

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 3 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 2 – point a a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(a a) for each battery electric light-duty vehicle registered in their territory, a total power output of 2,5 kW is provided through publicly accessible recharging stations if the share of battery electric light-duty vehicles in relation to the total projected light-duty vehicle fleet in that Member State is 1 % or greater than 1 % but below 2,5 %;

Amendment  90

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 3 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 2 – point a b (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(a b) for each battery electric light-duty vehicle registered in their territory, a total power output of at least 2 kW is provided through publicly accessible recharging stations if the share of battery electric light-duty vehicles in relation to the total projected light-duty vehicle fleet in that Member State is 2,5 % or greater than 2,5 % but below 5 %;

Amendment  91

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 3 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 2 – point a c (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(a c) for each battery electric light-duty vehicle registered in their territory, a total power output of at least 1,5 kW is provided through publicly accessible recharging stations if the share of battery electric light-duty vehicles in relation to the total projected light-duty vehicle fleet in that Member State is 5 % or greater than 5 % but below 7,5 %; and

Amendment  92

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 3 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 2 – point a d (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(a d) for each battery electric light-duty vehicle registered in their territory, a total power output of at least 1 kW is provided through publicly accessible recharging stations if the share of battery electric light-duty vehicles in relation to the total projected light-duty vehicle fleet in that Member State is 7,5 % or greater;

Amendment  93

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 3 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 2 – point b

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(b) for each plug-in hybrid light-duty vehicle registered in their territory, a total power output of at least 0.66 kW is provided through publicly accessible recharging stations.

(b) for each plug-in hybrid light-duty vehicle registered in their territory, a total power output of at least 2 kW is provided through publicly accessible recharging stations if the share of electric vehicles in relation to the total projected vehicle fleet in that Member State is less than 1 %;

Amendment  94

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 3 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 2 – point b a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(b a) for each plug-in hybrid light-duty vehicle registered in their territory, a total power output of at least 1.65 kW is provided through publicly accessible recharging stations if the share of electric vehicles in relation to the total projected vehicle fleet in that Member State is 1 % or greater than 1 % but below 2,5 %;

Amendment  95

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 3 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 2 – point b b (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(b b) for each plug-in hybrid light-duty vehicle registered in their territory, a total power output of at least 1,33 kW is provided through publicly accessible recharging stations if the share of electric vehicles in relation to the total projected vehicle fleet in that Member State is 2,5 % or greater than 2, 5 % but below 5 %;

Amendment  96

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 3 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 2 – point b c (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(b c) for each plug-in hybrid light-duty vehicle registered in their territory, a total power output of at least 1 kW is provided through publicly accessible recharging stations if the share of electric vehicles in relation to the total projected vehicle fleet in that Member State is 5 % or greater than 5 % but below 7,5 %; and

Amendment  97

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 3 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 2 – point b d (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(b d) for each plug-in hybrid light-duty vehicle registered in their territory, a total power output of at least 0,66 kW is provided through publicly accessible recharging stations if the share of electric vehicles in relation to the total projected vehicle fleet in that Member State is 7,5 % or greater.

Amendment  98

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 3 – paragraph 1 a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

1 a. Without prejudice to paragraph 1, second subparagraph, point (a) of , Member States shall ensure a deployment of minimum power output targets of recharging infrastructure at national level that is sufficient for:

 

- 3 % of the total projected light-duty vehicle fleet by 31 December 2027;

 

- 5 % of the total projected light-duty vehicle fleet by 31 December 2030;

Amendment  99

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 3 – paragraph 2 – point a – introductory part

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(a) along the TEN-T core network, publicly accessible recharging pools dedicated to light-duty vehicles and meeting the following requirements are deployed in each direction of travel with a maximum distance of 60 km in-between them:

(a) along the TEN-T core network and comprehensive network, publicly accessible recharging pools dedicated to light-duty vehicles and meeting the following requirements are deployed in each direction of travel with a maximum distance of 60 km in-between them:

Amendment  100

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 3 – paragraph 2 – point a – point i

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(i) by 31 December 2025, each recharging pool shall offer a power output of at least 300 kW and include at least one recharging station with an individual power output of at least 150 kW;

(i) by 31 December 2025, each recharging pool shall offer a power output of at least 600 kW and include at least one recharging station with an individual power output of at least 300 kW;

Amendment  101

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 3 – paragraph 2 – point a – point ii

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(ii) by 31 December 2030, each recharging pool shall offer a power output of at least 600 kW and include at least two recharging stations with an individual power output of at least 150 kW;

(ii) by 31 December 2030, each recharging pool shall offer a power output of at least 900 kW and include at least two recharging stations with an individual power output of at least 350 kW;

Amendment  102

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 3 – paragraph 2 – point b

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(b) along the TEN-T comprehensive network, publicly accessible recharging pools dedicated to light-duty vehicles and meeting the following requirements are deployed in each direction of travel with a maximum distance of 60 km in-between them:

deleted

(i) by 31 December 2030, each recharging pool shall offer a power output of at least 300 kW and include at least one recharging station with an individual power output of at least 150 kW;

 

(ii) by 31 December 2035, each recharging pool shall offer a power output of at least 600 kW and include at least two recharging stations with an individual power output of at least 150 kW.

 

Amendment  103

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 3 – paragraph 2 a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

2 a. In the case of rapid market uptake of electric vehicles in any relevant reporting period, Member States should shorten the deadlines specified in paragraph 2 accordingly and increase the targets for recharging pools accordingly.

Amendment  104

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 3 – paragraph 2 b (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

2 b. If the costs are disproportionate to the benefits, including environmental benefits, Member States may decide not to  apply paragraphs 1 and 2 of this Article to:

 

(a) outermost regions of the Union, as referred to in Article 349 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union; or

 

(b) islands that are not connected to mainland energy networks, falling under the definition of small connected systems or isolated systems according to Directive 2019/944.

 

In such cases, that Member State shall justify its decisions to the Commission and shall make available all relevant information in its national policy frameworks.

Amendment  105

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 3 – paragraph 2 c (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

2 c. Following a reasoned request by a Member State the Commission may grant an exemption from the requirement laid down in paragraph 2 for TEN-T roads with a total annual average daily traffic of less than 2000 light-duty vehicles, provided that the infrastructure cannot be justified in socio-economic cost-benefit terms. When granted, a Member State may on such roads deploy, a single publicly accessible recharging pool which serves both directions of travel, while meeting the requirements set out in paragraph 2 in terms of distance, total power output of the pool, number of points and power output of single points applicable for a single direction of travel, provided that the recharging pool is easily accessible from both directions of travel. The Commission shall grant such exemptions in duly justified cases, after an assessment of the reasoned request submitted by the Member State.

Amendment  106

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 3 – paragraph 2 d (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

2 d. Following a reasoned request by a Member State the Commission may grant an exemption from the maximum distance requirement laid down in paragraph 2 of this Article for TEN-T roads with a total annual average daily traffic of less than 1500 light-duty vehicles, provided that the infrastructure cannot be justified in socio-economic cost-benefit terms. Where such a derogation is granted, Member States may allow a higher maximum distance of up to 100km between recharging points. The Commission shall grant such exemptions in duly justified cases, after an assessment of the reasoned request submitted by the Member State.

Amendment  107

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 3 – paragraph 2 e (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

2 e. In densely populated areas and regions with a lack of available off-street parking or high uptake in registered light-duty electricity vehicles, Member States shall ensure that the number of publicly accessible recharging stations is increased accordingly in order to provide the necessary infrastructure and support the market development.

Amendment  108

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 3 – paragraph 3

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

3. Neighbouring Member States shall ensure that the maximum distances referred to in points (a) and (b) are not exceeded for cross-border sections of the TEN-T core and the TEN-T comprehensive network.

3. Neighbouring Member States shall take the necessary measures to ensure that the maximum distances referred to in points (a) and (b) are not exceeded for cross-border sections of the TEN-T core and the TEN-T comprehensive network.

Amendment  109

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 3 – paragraph 3 a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

3 a. The Commission shall take the necessary measures to ensure the cooperation with third-countries, especially candidate countries and those third countries, in which transit corridors connecting Member States, are situated.

Amendment  110

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 4 – paragraph 1 – point a – point i

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(i) by 31 December 2025, each recharging pool shall offer a power output of at least 1400 kW and include at least one recharging station with an individual power output of at least 350 kW;

(i) by 31 December 2025, each recharging pool shall offer a power output of at least 2000 kW and include at least two recharging station with an individual power output of at least 800 kW;

Amendment  111

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 4 – paragraph 1 – point a – point ii

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(ii) by 31 December 2030, each recharging pool shall offer a power output of at least 3500 kW and include at least two recharging stations with an individual power output of at least 350 kW;

(ii) by 31 December 2030, each recharging pool shall offer a power output of at least 5000 kW and include at least four recharging stations with an individual power output of at least 800 kW;

Amendment  112

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 4 – paragraph 1 – point b – point i

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(i) by 31 December 2030, each recharging pool shall offer a power output of at least 1400 kW and include at least one recharging station with an individual power output of at least 350 kW;

(i) by 31 December 2030, each recharging pool shall offer a power output of at least 2000 kW and include at least one recharging station with an individual power output of at least 800 kW;

Amendment  113

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 4 – paragraph 1 – point b – point ii

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(ii) by 1 December 2035, each recharging pool shall offer a power output of at least 3500 kW and include at least two recharging stations with an individual power output of at least 350 kW;

(ii) by 1 December 2035, each recharging pool shall offer a power output of at least 5000 kW and include at least two recharging stations with an individual power output of at least 800 kW;

Amendment  114

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 4 – paragraph 1 – point b a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(b a) following a reasoned request by a Member State the Commission may grant an exemption from the requirement laid down in paragraph 1 for TEN-T roads with a total annual average daily traffic of less than 800 heavy-duty vehicles, provided that the infrastructure cannot be justified in socio-economic cost-benefit terms. When granted, a Member State may on such roads deploy, a single publicly accessible recharging pool which serves both directions of travel, while meeting the requirements set out in paragraph 1 in terms of distance, total power output of the pool, number of points and power output of single points applicable for a single direction of travel, provided that the recharging pool is easily accessible from both directions of travel. The Commission shall grant such exemptions in duly justified cases, after an assessment of the reasoned request submitted by the Member State;

Amendment  115

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 4 – paragraph 1 – point b b (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(b b) following a reasoned request by a Member State the Commission may grant an exemption from the maximum distance requirement laid down in paragraph 1 of this Article for TEN-T roads with a total annual average daily traffic of less than 600 heavy-duty vehicles, provided that the infrastructure cannot be justified in socio-economic cost-benefit terms. Where such a derogation is granted, Member States may allow a higher maximum distance of up to 100km between recharging points. The Commission shall grant such exemptions in duly justified cases, after an assessment of the reasoned request submitted by the Member State;

Amendment  116

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 4 – paragraph 1 – point c

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(c) by 31 December 2030, in each safe and secure parking area at least one recharging station dedicated to heavy-duty vehicles with a power output of at least 100 kW is installed;

(c) by 31 December 2027, in each safe and secure parking area at least two recharging stations dedicated to heavy-duty vehicles with a power output of at least 100 kW are installed and enabled for smart and bi-directional charging;

Amendment  117

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 4 – paragraph 1 – point c a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(c a) by 31 December 2030, in each safe and secure parking area, at least four recharging stations dedicated to heavy-duty vehicles with a power output of at least 100 kW are installed and enabled for smart and bi-directional charging;

Amendment  118

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 4 – paragraph 1 – point d

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(d) by 31 December 2025, in each urban node publicly accessible recharging points dedicated to heavy-duty vehicles providing an aggregated power output of at least 600 kW are deployed, provided by recharging stations with an individual power output of at least 150 kW;

(d) by 31 December 2025, in each urban node publicly accessible recharging points dedicated to heavy-duty vehicles providing an aggregated power output of at least 1 400 kW are deployed, provided by recharging stations with an individual power output of at least 350 kW;

Amendment  119

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 4 – paragraph 1 – point e

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(e) by 31 December 2030, in each urban node publicly accessible recharging points dedicated to heavy-duty vehicles providing an aggregated power output of at least 1200 kW are deployed, provided by recharging stations with an individual power output of at least 150 kW.

(e) by 31 December 2030, in each urban node publicly accessible recharging points dedicated to heavy-duty vehicles providing an aggregated power output of at least 3 500 kW are deployed, provided by recharging stations with an individual power output of at least 350 kW.

Amendment  120

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 4 – paragraph 1 a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

1 a. The requirements referred to in paragraph 1, points (c), (ca), (d) and (e), shall apply in addition to the requirements set out in paragraph 1, points (a) and (b).

Amendment  121

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 4 – paragraph 1 b (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

1 b. The Commission shall consider whether to increase the individual power output referred to in paragraph 1, points (a), (b), (d), and (e), once the common technical specifications are available and supplemented in accordance with Annex II as part of the review of this Regulation, pursuant to Article 22.

Amendment  122

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 4 – paragraph 1 c (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

1 c. Member States shall ensure that the necessary electricity grid connection and grid capacity is provided. Therefore, Member States should, in coordination with the relevant stakeholders, carry out an analysis before 2025 in order to evaluate and plan the necessary grid reinforcements to the electricity grids.

Amendment  123

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 4 – paragraph 2

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

2. Neighbouring Member States shall ensure that the maximum distances referred to in points (a) and (b) are not exceeded for cross-border sections of the TEN-T core and the TEN-T comprehensive network.

2. Neighbouring Member States shall take the necessary measures to ensure that the maximum distances referred to in points (a) and (b) are not exceeded for cross-border sections of the TEN-T core and the TEN-T comprehensive network.

Amendment  124

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 4 – paragraph 2 a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

2 a. The Commission shall take the necessary measures to ensure the cooperation with third countries, especially candidate countries and those third countries, in which transit corridors connecting Member States are situated.

Amendment  125

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 4 – paragraph 2 b (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

2 b. If the costs are disproportionate to the benefits, including the environmental benefits, a Member State may decide not to apply paragraph 1 and 2 of this Article to:

 

(a) outermost regions of the Union, as referred to in Article 349 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union; or

 

(b) islands that are not connected to mainland energy networks, falling under the definition of small connected systems or isolated systems according to Directive 2019/944.

 

In such cases, Member States shall justify their decisions to the Commission and shall make available all relevant information in their national policy frameworks.

Amendment  126

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 5 – paragraph 2 – subparagraph 1 – point a – introductory part

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(a) operators of recharging points shall, at publicly accessible recharging stations with a power output below 50 kW, deployed from the date referred to in Article 24, accept electronic payments through terminals and devices used for payment services, including at least one of the following:

To that end, operators of recharging points shall, at publicly accessible recharging stations deployed from [date of entry into force of this Regulation], accept electronic payments through terminals and devices used for payment services, including at least payment card readers or devices with a contactless functionality that is at least able to read payment cards. Additionally, if possible, devices using an internet connection with which for instance a Quick Response code can be specifically generated and used for the payment transaction may be provided.

Amendment  127

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 5 – paragraph 2 – subparagraph 1 – point a – point i

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(i) payment card readers;

deleted

Amendment  128

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 5 – paragraph 2 – subparagraph 1 – point a – point ii

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(ii) devices with a contactless functionality that is at least able to read payment cards;

deleted

Amendment  129

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 5 – paragraph 2 – subparagraph 1 – point a – point iii

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(iii) devices using an internet connection with which for instance a Quick Response code can be specifically generated and used for the payment transaction;

deleted

Amendment  130

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 5 – paragraph 2 – subparagraph 1 – point b

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(b) operators of recharging points shall, at publicly accessible recharging stations with a power output equal to or more than 50 kW, deployed from the date referred to in Article 24, accept electronic payments through terminals and devices used for payment services, including at least one of the following:

deleted

(i) payment card readers;

 

(ii) devices with a contactless functionality that is at least able to read payment cards.

 

Amendment  131

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 5 – paragraph 2 – subparagraph 2

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

From 1 January 2027 onwards, operators of recharging points shall ensure that all publicly accessible recharging stations with a power output equal to or more than 50 kW operated by them comply with the requirement in point (b).

From 1 January 2027 onwards, operators of recharging points shall ensure that all publicly accessible recharging stations operated by them comply with the requirements laid down in this paragraph.

Amendment  132

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 5 – paragraph 2 – subparagraph 3

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

The requirements laid down in points (a) and (b) shall not apply to publicly accessible recharging points that do not require payment for the recharging service.

The requirements laid down in this paragraph shall not apply to publicly accessible recharging points that do not require payment for the recharging service.

Amendment  133

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 5 – paragraph 3

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

3. Operators of recharging points shall, when they offer automatic authentication at a publicly accessible recharging point operated by them, ensure that end users always have the right not to make use of the automatic authentication and may either recharge their vehicle on an ad hoc basis, as provided for in paragraph 3, or use another contract-based recharging solution offered at that recharging point. Operators of recharging points shall transparently display that option and offer it in a convenient manner to the end user, at each publicly accessible recharging point that they operate and where they make available automatic authentication.

3. Operators of recharging points shall, when they offer automatic authentication at a publicly accessible recharging point operated by them, ensure that end users always have the right not to make use of the automatic authentication and may either recharge their vehicle on an ad hoc basis, as provided for in paragraph 3, or use another contract-based recharging solution offered at that recharging point. Operators of recharging points shall transparently display that option and offer it in a convenient manner to the end user, and shall ensure that e-roaming is available, at each publicly accessible recharging point that they operate and where they make available automatic authentication.

Amendment  134

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 5 – paragraph 4

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

4. Prices charged by operators of publicly accessible recharging points shall be reasonable, easily and clearly comparable, transparent and non-discriminatory. Operators of publicly accessible recharging points shall not discriminate between the prices charged to end users and prices charged to mobility service providers nor between prices charged to different mobility service providers. Where relevant, the level of prices may only be differentiated in a proportionate manner, according to an objective justification.

4. Operators of publicly accessible recharging points shall ensure that any mobility service provider has access to the recharging stations operated by them in a non-discriminatory manner. Prices charged by operators of publicly accessible recharging points shall be reasonable and affordable, easily and clearly comparable, transparent and non-discriminatory. Operators of publicly accessible recharging points shall not discriminate between the prices charged to end users and prices charged to mobility service providers nor between prices charged to different mobility service providers. Where relevant, the level of prices may only be differentiated in a proportionate manner, according to an objective justification or based on contractual terms.

Amendment  135

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 5 – paragraph 4 a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

4 a. Member States shall take appropriate measures to prevent unfair practices that target consumers, including in relation to the prices set for the use of publicly accessible charging points, such as price gouging, with the overall objective of safeguarding competition on the market and consumer rights. The adoption of such measures shall be based on regular monitoring of pricing and practices of vehicle producers and recharging point operators. The Member States shall notify the Commission of the adoption of such measures by the appropriate regulatory authority.

Amendment  136

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 5 – paragraph 5 – introductory part

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

5. Operators of recharging points shall clearly display the ad hoc price and all its components at all publicly accessible recharging stations operated by them so that these are known to end users before they initiate a recharging session. At least the following price components, if applicable at the recharging station, shall be clearly displayed:

5. Operators of recharging points shall clearly display the ad hoc price per kWh and all its components at all publicly accessible recharging stations operated by them so that this information is known to end users before they initiate a recharging session.

Amendment  137

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 5 – paragraph 5 – indent 1

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 price per session,

deleted

Amendment  138

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 5 – paragraph 5 – indent 2

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 price per minute,

deleted

Amendment  139

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 5 – paragraph 5 – indent 3

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 price per kWh.

deleted

Amendment  140

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 5 – paragraph 6

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

6. Prices charged by mobility service providers to end users shall be reasonable, transparent and non-discriminatory. Mobility service providers shall make available to end users all applicable price information, prior to the start of the recharging session, and specific to their intended recharging session, through freely available, widely supported electronic means, clearly distinguishing the price components charged by the operator of recharging point, applicable e-roaming costs and other fees or charges applied by the mobility service provider. The fees shall be reasonable, transparent and non-discriminatory. No extra charges for cross-border e-roaming shall be applied.

6. Prices charged by mobility service providers to end users shall be reasonable and affordable, transparent and non-discriminatory. Mobility service providers shall make available to end users all applicable price information, prior to the start of the recharging session, and specific to their intended recharging session, through freely available, widely supported electronic means, clearly displaying the price per kWh charged by the operator of the recharging point, applicable e-roaming costs and other fees or charges applied by the mobility service provider. The fees shall be reasonable and affordable, transparent and non-discriminatory. No extra charges for cross-border e-roaming shall be applied.

Amendment  141

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 5 – paragraph 6 a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

6 a. Operators of smart or bi-directional recharging points shall make available information that they receive from transmission system operators, electricity suppliers, or via their own electricity production, on the share of renewable electricity in the transmission system and the associated greenhouse gas emissions. That information shall be made available  in regular real time intervals, it shall be accompanied by forecasting, where available, and, where applicable, the terms of the contract with the electricity provider shall apply.

Amendment  142

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 5 – paragraph 7

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

7. From the date referred to in Article 24, operators of recharging points shall ensure that all publicly accessible recharging points operated by them are digitally-connected recharging points.

7. From [date of entry into force of this Regulation], operators of recharging points shall ensure that all newly built or renovated publicly accessible recharging points operated by them are digitally-connected, include e-roaming functionality and their location and status are easily visible online.

Amendment  143

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 5 – paragraph 8

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

8. From the date referred to in Article 24, operators of recharging points shall ensure that all publicly accessible normal power recharging points operated by them are capable of smart recharging.

8. From [date of entry into force of this Regulation], operators of recharging points shall ensure that all newly built or renovated publicly accessible recharging points operated by them are capable of smart recharging.

Amendment  144

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 5 – paragraph 8 a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

8 a. Operators of publicly accessible recharging points shall ensure that:

 

(a) the recharging stations operate in a proper condition throughout their commercial lifetime and that the functionalities set out in paragraphs 2 to 5 are always available to end users, with regular m Maintenance and repair operations being executed as soon as any malfunction is detected;

 

(b) all publicly accessible recharging points operated by them comply with provisions of directive (EU) 2016/1148 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 6 July 2016 concerning measures for a high common level of security of network and information systems across the Union.

Amendment  145

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 5 – paragraph 9

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

9. Member States shall take the necessary measures to ensure that appropriate signposting is deployed within parking and rest areas on the TEN-T road network where alternative fuels infrastructure is installed, to enable easy identification of the exact location of the alternative fuels infrastructure.

9. From [date of entry into force of this Regulation], Member States shall take the necessary measures to ensure that appropriate signposting is deployed within parking and rest areas on the TEN-T road network where alternative fuels infrastructure is installed, to enable easy identification of the exact location of the alternative fuels infrastructure. Signposting shall also be deployed at an appropriate distance on the TEN-T road network leading up to parking and rest areas where such alternative fuels infrastructure is installed.

Amendment  146

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 5 – paragraph 9 a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

9 a. Member States shall encourage operators to take necessary measures to offer standardised and fully interoperable information systems providing information about the availability of recharging points. Such systems shall be precise, user-friendly and operable in the official language(s) of the Member State and in English.

Amendment  147

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 5 – paragraph 11 a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

11 a. Operators of publicly accessible recharging points shall ensure that the necessary contact information for local emergency services is clearly displayed at charging stations.

Amendment  148

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 5 – paragraph 11 b (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

11 b. At unattended charging stations, Member States shall facilitate the installation of camera surveillance systems and an emergency call button for immediate contact with local emergency services.

Amendment  149

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 6 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 1

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

Member States shall ensure that, in their territory, a minimum number of publicly accessible hydrogen refuelling stations are put in place by 31 December 2030.

Member States shall ensure that, in their territory, a minimum number of publicly accessible hydrogen refuelling stations are put in place by 31 December 2027.

Amendment  150

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 6 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 2

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

To that end Member States shall ensure that by 31 December 2030 publicly accessible hydrogen refuelling stations with a minimum capacity of 2 t/day and equipped with at least a 700 bars dispenser are deployed with a maximum distance of 150 km in-between them along the TEN-T core and the TEN-T comprehensive network. Liquid hydrogen shall be made available at publicly accessible refuelling stations with a maximum distance of 450 km in-between them.

To that end Member States shall ensure that by 31 December 2027 publicly accessible hydrogen refuelling stations with a minimum capacity of 2 t/day and equipped with at least a 700 bars dispenser are deployed with a maximum distance of 100 km in-between them along the TEN-T core and the TEN-T comprehensive network. Liquid hydrogen shall be made available at publicly accessible refuelling stations with a maximum distance of 400 km in-between them.

Amendment  151

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 6 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 3

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

They shall ensure that by 31 December 2030, at least one publicly accessible hydrogen refuelling station is deployed in each urban node. An analysis on the best location shall be carried out for such refuelling stations that shall in particular consider the deployment of such stations in multimodal hubs where also other transport modes could be supplied.

They shall ensure that by 31 December 2027 at least one publicly accessible hydrogen refuelling station is deployed in each urban node. An analysis on the best location shall be carried out for such refuelling stations that shall in particular consider the deployment of such stations in multimodal hubs where also other transport modes could be supplied.

Amendment  152

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 6 – paragraph 1 a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

1 a. Member States shall publish a detailed list of multimodal transport hubs, industrial clusters and ports suitable for the deployment of hydrogen refuelling stations by 31 December 2024.

Amendment  153

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 6 – paragraph 2

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

2. Neighbouring Member States shall ensure that the maximum distance referred to in paragraph 1, second subparagraph is not exceeded for cross-border sections of the TEN-T core and the TEN-T comprehensive network.

2. Neighbouring Member States shall take the necessary measures to ensure that the maximum distance referred to in paragraph 1, second subparagraph is not exceeded for cross-border sections of the TEN-T core and the TEN-T comprehensive network.

Amendment  154

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 6 – paragraph 3 a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

3 a. If the costs are disproportionate to the benefits, including the environmental benefits, Member States may decide not to apply paragraph 1 of this Article to: (a) outermost regions of the Union, as referred to in Article 349 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union; or (b) islands that are not connected to mainland energy networks, falling under the definition of small connected systems or isolated systems according to Directive 2019/944, In such cases, Member States shall justify their decisions to the Commission and shall make available all relevant information in their national policy frameworks.

Amendment  155

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 6 – paragraph 3 b (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

3 b. The Commission shall take the necessary measures to ensure cooperation with third countries, especially candidate countries and those third countries in which transit corridors connecting Member States are situated.

Amendment  156

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 7 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 1 – introductory part

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

From the date referred to in Article 24 all operators of publicly accessible hydrogen refuelling stations operated by them shall provide for the possibility for end users to refuel on an ad hoc basis using a payment instrument that is widely used in the Union. To that end, operators of hydrogen refuelling stations shall ensure that all hydrogen refuelling stations operated by them accept electronic payments through terminals and devices used for payment services, including at least one of the following:

From [date of entry into force of this Regulation] all operators of publicly accessible hydrogen refuelling stations operated by them shall provide for the possibility for end users to refuel on an ad hoc basis using a payment instrument that is widely used in the Union. To that end, operators of hydrogen refuelling stations shall ensure that all hydrogen refuelling stations operated by them accept electronic payments through terminals and devices used for payment services, including at least payment card readers or contactless devices that are able to read payment cards.

Amendment  157

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 7 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 1 – point a

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(a) payment card readers;

deleted

Amendment  158

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 7 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 1 – point b

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(b) devices with a contactless functionality that is at least able to read payment cards.

deleted

Amendment  159

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 7 – paragraph 1 a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

1 a. Member States shall encourage operators to offer standardised and fully interoperable information systems providing information about the availability of refuelling points. Such systems shall be precise, user-friendly and operable in the official language(s) of the Member State and in English.

Amendment  160

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 7 – paragraph 3

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

3. Operators of hydrogen refuelling points shall make price information available before the start of a refuelling session at the refuelling stations operated by them.

3. Operators of hydrogen refuelling points shall make price information available before the start of a refuelling session at the refuelling stations operated by them. They shall clearly display the ad hoc price and all its components at all publicly accessible refuelling stations operated by them so that these are known to end users before a refuelling session is initiated. The price per kg shall be clearly displayed.

Amendment  161

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 7 – paragraph 4

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

4. Operators of publicly accessible refuelling stations may provide hydrogen refuelling services to customers on a contractual basis, including in the name and on behalf of other mobility service providers. Mobility service providers shall charge prices to end users that are reasonable, transparent and non-discriminatory. Mobility service providers shall make available to end users all applicable price information, prior to the start of the recharging session, and specific to their intended recharging session, through freely available, widely supported electronic means, clearly distinguishing the price components charged by the operator of the hydrogen refuelling point, applicable e-roaming costs and other fees or charges applied by the mobility service provider.

4. Operators of publicly accessible refuelling stations may provide hydrogen refuelling services to customers on a contractual basis, including in the name and on behalf of other mobility service providers. Mobility service providers shall charge prices to end users that are reasonable, transparent and non-discriminatory. Mobility service providers shall make available to end users all applicable price information, prior to the start of the refuelling session, and specific to their intended refuelling session, through freely available, widely supported electronic means, clearly distinguishing the price components charged by the operator of the hydrogen refuelling point, applicable e-roaming costs and other fees or charges applied by the mobility service provider.

Amendment  162

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 9 – paragraph 1 – introductory part

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

1. Member States shall ensure that a minimum shore-side electricity supply for seagoing container and passenger ships is provided in maritime ports. To that end, Member States shall take the necessary measures to ensure that by 1 January 2030:

1. Member States shall ensure that a minimum shore-side electricity supply for seagoing container and passenger ships is provided in TEN-T core and comprehensive maritime ports. To that end, and in full alignment with Article 5, (1) and (2) of Regulation XXXX-XXX [FuelEU Maritime], Member States shall, in cooperation with the managing body or the competent authority, take the necessary measures to ensure that by 1 January 2030:

Amendment  163

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 9 – paragraph 1 a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

1 a. Member States shall ensure that sufficient grid infrastructure and capacity, power reserve and frequency conversion is made available to meet the requirements set out in paragraph 1, points (a), (b) and (c).

Amendment  164

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 9 – paragraph 2 – introductory part

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

2. For the determination of the number of port calls the following port calls shall not be taken into account:

2. For the determination of the number of port calls and in full alignment with Article 5(3) of Regulation XXXX-XXX [FuelEU Maritime], the following port calls shall not be taken into account:

Amendment  165

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 9 – paragraph 2 – point a a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(a a) port calls estimated to be at berth for less than two hours which were prevented from departing within that timeframe due to events that could not be foreseen when entering the port and that were clearly outside the operator’s control or responsibility;

Amendment  166

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 9 – paragraph 2 – point c a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(c a) several short port calls to load and unload at different berths in the same port, not surpassing the time limit specified in point (a);

Amendment  167

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 9 – paragraph 3

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

3. Where the maritime port of the TEN-T core network and the TEN-T comprehensive network is located on an island which is not connected directly to the electricity grid, paragraph 1 shall not apply, until such a connection has been completed or there is a sufficient locally generated capacity from clean energy sources.

3. Where the maritime port of the TEN-T core network and the TEN-T comprehensive network is located on an island or in an outermost region of the Union as referred to in Article 349 TFEU, which is not connected directly to the electricity grid, paragraph 1 shall not apply, until such a connection has been completed or there is a sufficient locally generated capacity from clean energy sources.

Amendment  168

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 9 – paragraph 3 a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

3 a. Without prejudice to paragraph 3, paragraph 1 shall not apply to the territory of Ceuta and Melilla until a connection directly to the electricity grid of the mainland, or to that of a neighbouring country, has been completed, or there is sufficient locally generated capacity from clean energy sources.

Amendment  169

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 10 – paragraph 1 – point b a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(b a) sufficient grid capacity and connection, power reserve and frequency conversion to the ports are available.

Amendment  170

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 11 – title

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

Targets for supply of LNG in maritime ports

Targets for supply of LNG, ammonia and hydrogen in maritime ports

Amendment  171

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 11 – paragraph 1

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

1. Member States shall ensure that an appropriate number of refuelling points for LNG are put in place at TEN-T core maritime ports referred to in paragraph 2, to enable seagoing ships to circulate throughout the TEN-T core network by 1 January 2025. Member States shall cooperate with neighbouring Member States where necessary to ensure adequate coverage of the TEN-T core network.

1. Member States shall ensure that an appropriate number of refuelling points for LNG, ammonia and hydrogen are put in place at TEN-T core maritime ports referred to in paragraph 2, to meet market demand both in the short and long term for such fuels and enable seagoing ships to circulate throughout the TEN-T core network by 1 January 2025. Member States shall cooperate with neighbouring Member States where necessary to ensure adequate coverage of the TEN-T core network.

Amendment  172

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 11 – paragraph 2

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

2. Member States shall designate in their national policy frameworks TEN-T core maritime ports that shall provide access to the refuelling points for LNG referred to in paragraph 1, also taking into consideration actual market needs and developments.

2. Member States shall designate in their national policy frameworks TEN-T core maritime ports that shall provide access to the refuelling points referred to in paragraph 1, also taking into consideration port development, existing LNG supply points and actual market needs and developments, as well as their obligations in relation to the Union climate neutrality objective.

Amendment  173

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 12 – paragraph 1 – introductory part

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

1. Member States shall ensure that airport managing bodies of all TEN-T core and comprehensive network airports ensure the provision of electricity supply to stationary aircraft by:

1. Member States shall ensure that airport managing bodies and suppliers of ground handling services of all TEN-T core and comprehensive network airports ensure the provision of electricity supply to stationary aircraft, by:

Amendment  174

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 12 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 1 a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

However, paragraph 1(a) and (b) shall not apply to short-term parking positions, for the de-icing of aircraft, parking positions in military areas and parking positions for general air traffic (below 5,7 to MTOW).

Amendment  175

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 12 – paragraph 2 a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

2 a. By way of derogation from  paragraph 1 (a) and (b), where the airport of the TEN-T core network or the TEN-T comprehensive network is located on an island which is not connected directly to the electricity grid, or in an outermost region, that paragraph shall not apply until such a connection has been completed or there is sufficient locally generated capacity from clean energy sources, or if the costs are disproportionate to the benefits, including environmental benefits.

Amendment  176

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 12 – paragraph 2 b (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

2 b. Member States shall ensure that airport managing bodies or ground handling service suppliers of TEN-T core network airports provide preconditioned air systems.

Amendment  177

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 12 a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

Article 12 a

 

Infrastructure targets for railway lines

 

1. Member States shall ensure the provision of sufficient infrastructure to enable railway lines across the Union to meet the electrification objectives of Regulation (EU) No 1315/2013 [TEN T Regulation].

 

2. Where the direct electrification of railway lines is not possible, including for reasons linked to the cost-efficiency of the service, Member States shall ensure that an appropriate number of charging stations for battery-powered trains, and hydrogen refuelling stations for rail, are put in place. To that end, Member States shall ensure that, along the TEN-T core and comprehensive networks, recharging stations for battery-powered trains and refuelling stations for hydrogen trains are deployed in each direction of travel in sections for which electrification is not provided for in Regulation (EU) No 1315 2013 [TEN T Regulation].

 

3. Member States shall ensure that, when decisions are taken on the necessary infrastructure to be deployed in order to comply with paragraph 2, the ‘energy efficiency first’ principle is fully taken into account.

 

4. Prior to deployment, Member States shall carry out an analysis of the best location for such stations. In doing so, Member States shall consider, in particular, the deployment of stations in urban nodes and multimodal hubs where other transport modes could also be integrated.

Amendment  178

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 13 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 1

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

By 1 January 2024, each Member State shall prepare and send to the Commission a draft national policy framework for the development of the market as regards alternative fuels in the transport sector and the deployment of the relevant infrastructure.

By 1 January 2024, each Member State shall prepare, in coordination with national, regional and local authorities, and send to the Commission a draft national policy framework for the development of the market as regards alternative fuels in the transport sector and the deployment of the relevant infrastructure.

Amendment  179

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 13 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 2 – point a

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(a) an assessment of the current state and future development of the market as regards alternative fuels in the transport sector, and of the development of alternative fuels infrastructure, considering intermodal access of alternative fuels infrastructure and, where relevant, cross-border continuity;

(a) an assessment of the current state and future development of the market as regards alternative fuels in the transport sector, and of the development of alternative fuels infrastructure, considering intermodal access of alternative fuels infrastructure and, where relevant, cross-border continuity and mobility and accessibility between islands and outermost regions, as well as between them and the mainland;

Amendment  180

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 13 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 2 – point a a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(a a) an assessment of how measures are implemented in full accordance with the energy efficiency first principle; Member States shall provide an account for how the ‘energy efficiency first’ principle has been applied when making planning and investment decisions related to the deployment of recharging and refuelling infrastructure of alternative fuels;

Amendment  181

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 13 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 2 – point a b (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(a b) an assessment of the current state and future development of grid connections and capacity, including any improvements and resilience measures needed, as well as the required financing;

Amendment  182

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 13 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 2 – point a c (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(a c) an assessment of the prospects of changes in the amount of electricity available to the transport sector, as well as its sources;

Amendment  183

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 13 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 2 – point b

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(b) national targets and objectives pursuant to Articles 3, 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12 for which mandatory national targets are set out in this Regulation;

(b) national targets and objectives pursuant to Articles 3, 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 and 12a for which mandatory national targets are set out in this Regulation;

Amendment  184

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 13 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 2 – point c

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(c) national targets and objectives for the deployment of alternative fuels infrastructure related to points (l), (m), (n), (o) and (p) of this paragraph for which no mandatory targets are set out in this Regulation;

(c) national targets and objectives for the deployment of alternative fuels infrastructure related to points (l), (l a), (m), (n), (o), (p), (p a) and (p b) of this paragraph for which no mandatory targets are set out in this Regulation;

Amendment  185

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 13 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 2 – point e

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(e) measures to promote the deployment of alternative fuels infrastructure for captive fleets, in particular for electric recharging and hydrogen refuelling stations for public transport services and electric recharging stations for car sharing;

(e) measures to promote the deployment of alternative fuels infrastructure for captive fleets, in particular for electric recharging and hydrogen refuelling stations for public transport services and electric recharging stations for car sharing, as well as for taxis;

Amendment  186

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 13 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 2 – point g a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(g a) national targets and measures to promote alternative fuels infrastructure along the road networks which are not included in the core and comprehensive TEN-T networks, in particular with respect to publicly accessible recharging points. In particular, Member States shall ensure that high and medium-level road networks for both light and heavy mobility are adequately covered by the recharge infrastructure;

Amendment  187

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 13 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 2 – point h

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(h) measures to promote a sufficient number of publicly accessible high power recharging points;

(h) measures to promote a sufficient number of publicly accessible high power recharging points with a sufficient power output to increase consumer convenience and ensure the seamless circulation of electric vehicles on its territory and, where applicable, across borders;

Amendment  188

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 13 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 2 – point i a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(i a) measures to guarantee accessibility of all territories to recharging and refuelling infrastructure, paying particular attention to rural areas to ensure their accessibility and territorial cohesion; targeted policies and measures should be considered and implemented for these territories by the Member States;

Amendment  189

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 13 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 2 – point j

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(j) measures to ensure that publicly accessible recharging and refuelling points are accessible to older persons, persons with reduced mobility and with disabilities, which have to be in line with the accessibility requirements of Annex I and Annex III of Directive 2019/882;

(j) measures to ensure that all publicly accessible recharging and refuelling points are accessible to older persons, persons with reduced mobility and with disabilities, which have to be in line with the accessibility requirements of Annex I and Annex III of Directive 2019/882;

Amendment  190

 

Proposal for a regulation

Article 13 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 2 – point j a (new)

 

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(j a) measures targeting the specific needs of outermost regions, where applicable;

Amendment  1