Procedure : 2014/2931(RPS)
Document stages in plenary
Document selected : B8-0326/2014

Texts tabled :

B8-0326/2014

Debates :

Votes :

PV 17/12/2014 - 10.18
Explanations of votes

Texts adopted :


MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION
PDF 224kWORD 57k
4.12.2014
PE539.049v01-00
 
B8-0326/2014

pursuant to Rule 106(2), (3) and (4)(c) of the Rules of Procedure


on Draft Council Directive .../.../EU laying down calculation methods and reporting requirements pursuant to Directive 98/70/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council relating to the quality of petrol and diesel fuels (D00000/00 – 2014/2931(RPS))


Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety
Rapporteur: Giovanni La Via

European Parliament resolution on Draft Council Directive .../.../EU laying down calculation methods and reporting requirements pursuant to Directive 98/70/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council relating to the quality of petrol and diesel fuels (D00000/00 – 2014/2931(RPS))  
B8‑0326/2014

The European Parliament,

–       having regard to Draft Council Directive .../.../EU of... laying down calculation methods and reporting requirements pursuant to Directive 98/70/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council relating to the quality of petrol and diesel fuels,

–       having regard to Directive 98/70/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 13 October 1998 relating to the quality of petrol and diesel fuels and amending Council Directive 93/12/EEC(1), and in particular 7a(5) thereof,

–       having regard to Draft Commission Directive .../.../EU of ... laying down calculation methods and reporting requirements pursuant to Directive 98/70/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council relating to the quality of petrol and diesel fuels (D016937/03),

–        having regard to the opinion of 23 February 2012 delivered by the committee referred to in Article 11 of Directive 98/70/EC,

–       having regard to the Commission impact assessment on the calculation methods and reporting requirements pursuant to Article 7a of Directive 98/70/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council relating to the quality of petrol and diesel fuels (SWD(2014)0296),

–       having regard to Article 5a(4)(e) of the Council Decision of 28 June 1999 laying down the procedures for the exercise of implementing powers conferred on the Commission(2),

–       having regard to the motion for a resolution of the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety,

–       having regard to Rule 106(2), (3) and (4)(c) of its Rules of Procedure,

A.     whereas the revised Directive 98/70/EC(3) on the quality of petrol and diesel obliges suppliers to report annually on the lifecycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions per unit of energy of fuel and energy supplied within each Member State, and to reduce by at least 6 % the lifecycle GHG intensity of the fuels supplied by 31 December 2020 compared to the EU average for lifecycle emissions per unit of energy from fossil fuels in 2010;

B.     whereas the decarbonisation obligation was introduced to ensure that the fuel sector contributes to achieving the Union’s longer-term GHG reduction goals, and in order to stimulate the further development of low-carbon fuels and other measures to reduce emissions from the production chain;

C.     whereas the directive requires that suppliers calculate and report lifecycle GHG emissions for biofuels either by using actual values or by using default values based on the feedstock-specific production pathways;

D.     whereas the Commission proposal for a draft Council directive recognises the significant differences in the GHG intensity of fuels between conventional crudes (93.2 gCO2eq/MJ for petrol) and unconventional feedstocks, such as tar sands/natural bitumen (107 gCO2eq/MJ), oil shale (131.1 gCO2eq/MJ) or coal-to-liquid (172 gCO2eq/MJ);

E.     whereas as regards achieving compliance with the decarbonisation target – as provided for under Article 7a – the draft Council directive would require suppliers to use the same EU‑wide average default value to represent the per-unit GHG intensity per fuel type for all fossil feedstocks;

F.     whereas the draft Council directive does not allow for suppliers to report on the basis of the feedstocks which they actually use, thereby eliminating the cost‑effective option of using feedstocks which are less GHG-intensive to contribute towards achieving compliance with the decarbonisation target;

G.     whereas the Commission impact assessment considered a range of other options in addition to the ‘basic reporting approach’ of average default GHG values by fuel type (e.g. petrol or diesel) based on an EU fuel mix (B1) presented in the draft Council directive, including through the use of disaggregated default GHG values by main feedstock types (C), or using conservative disaggregated default GHG values while allowing suppliers to report actual values (‘hybrid approach’(D2)); whereas the impact assessment concluded that options C, D2 and B1 have similar economic impacts; whereas the impact assessment concluded that option B1, which was chosen for the draft Council directive, entails inaccuracies due to the unavailability of EU average fuel mix data and given that it does not cover imported products; whereas the impact assessment also concluded that option B1 has the worst environmental performance due to the fact that it encourages greater consumption of unconventional energy sources in the final EU fuel mix;

H.     whereas the impact assessment notes that ‘although the energy share of high GHG intensity unconventional oil remains comparatively low at 3 %, their associated greenhouse gas emissions at 3.48 gCO2e/MJ are significant in terms of the 6 % reduction target as they alone represent 4% of the 2010 fossil fuel GHG intensity levels and thus equivalent to more than half of the desired reduction in GHG intensity of the fuels used in the EU in 2020’(p. 24), and that ‘in certain Member States where significant investments are being made by refineries to be able to process heavier crudes, the share of unconventional oil could increase very rapidly’ (p.17);

I.      whereas the estimated penetration of fuels from unconventional sources, including tar sands, does not take into account recent changes in infrastructure and the oil market that are enhancing the ability of Canadian tar sands crude to reach ocean ports for global exports;

J.      whereas according to the impact assessment, the share of unconventional fuels in the EU fuel mix would be significantly reduced if disaggregation based on main feedstock types (option C) were used for the methodology;

K.     whereas the draft Council directive allows for savings claimed for upstream emission reductions (e.g. from flaring and venting) to be included in the calculation of suppliers’ lifecycle GHG emissions without guarantees for additionality or the environmental integrity of the savings;

L.     whereas the method used to calculate levels of GHG emissions from fuels and other energy from non-biological sources should be subject to further review to take into account the anticipated increased use of fuels with high GHG intensity levels and fuels derived from other emerging feedstocks;

1.      Opposes the adoption of the draft Council directive;

2.      Considers that the draft Council directive is not compatible with the aim and content of Directive 98/70/EC;

3.      Calls on the Commission to withdraw the draft Council directive and to submit a new one to the committee, based on the requirement that disaggregated average default GHG intensity values be reported by feedstock types for petrol and diesel, while allowing suppliers to report actual values;

4.      Instructs its President to forward this resolution to the Council and the Commission, and to the governments and parliaments of the Member States.

(1)

OJ L 350, 28.12.1998, p. 58.

(2)

OJ L 184, 17.7.1999, p. 23.

(3)

OJ L 140, 5.6.2009, p. 88.

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