Procedure : 2016/2515(RSP)
Document stages in plenary
Document selected : B8-0160/2016

Texts tabled :

B8-0160/2016

Debates :

Votes :

PV 04/02/2016 - 8.9
CRE 04/02/2016 - 8.9
Explanations of votes
PV 25/02/2016 - 7.15
CRE 25/02/2016 - 7.15
Explanations of votes

Texts adopted :

P8_TA(2016)0066

MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION
PDF 174kWORD 63k
See also joint motion for a resolution RC-B8-0151/2016
27.1.2016
PE576.521v01-00
 
B8-0160/2016

to wind up the debate on the statement by the Vice-President of the Commission / High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy

pursuant to Rule 123(2) of the Rules of Procedure


on the situation in Yemen (2016/2515(RSP))


Fabio Massimo Castaldo, Ignazio Corrao, Rolandas Paksas on behalf of the EFDD Group

European Parliament resolution on the situation in Yemen (2016/2515(RSP))  
B8-0160/2016

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to its previous resolutions on Yemen,

–  having regard to the statement of 26 March 2015 by the Vice-President of the Commission / High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy (VP/HR), Federica Mogherini, on the situation in Yemen,

–  having regard to the joint statement of 1April 2015 by the VP/HR, Federica Mogherini, and the Commissioner for Humanitarian Aid and Crisis Management, Christos Stylianides, on the impact of fighting in Yemen,

–  having regard to the joint statement of 11 May 2015 by the VP/HR, Federica Mogherini, and the Commissioner for Humanitarian Aid and Crisis Management, Christos Stylianides, on the proposed truce in Yemen,

–  having regard to the joint statement of 3 July 2015 by the VP/HR, Federica Mogherini, and the Commissioner for Humanitarian Aid and Crisis Management, Christos Stylianides, on the crisis in Yemen,

–  having regard to the joint statement of 2 October 2015 by the VP/HR, Federica Mogherini, and the Commissioner for Humanitarian Aid and Crisis Management, Christos Stylianides, on Yemen,

–  having regard to the Council conclusions of 20 April and 16 November 2015 on Yemen,

–  having regard to the statements of 26 October, 6 December and 15 December 2015 by the EEAS spokesperson,

–  having regard to United Nations (UN) Security Council resolutions 2014 (2011), 2051 (2012), 2140 (2014), 2201 (2015) and 2216 (2015),

–   having regard to the statement of 24 May 2015 by the Co-Chairs of the 24th Gulf Cooperation Council – European Union (GCC-EU) Joint Council and Ministerial Meeting,

–  having regard to the UN Security Council press statements of 25 June, 23 October and 23 December 2015 on the situation in Yemen,

–  having regard to the resolution adopted by the Humans Rights Council on 2 October 2015 on technical assistance and capacity-building for Yemen in the field of human rights,

–  having regard to the Report of 7 September 2015 of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights on the situation of human rights in Yemen,

–  having regard to the Peace and National Partnership Agreement of 21 September 2014, the National Dialogue Conference outcomes document of 25 January 2014 and the Gulf Cooperation Council initiative of 21 November 2011,

–  having regard to the Charter of the United Nations,

–  having regard to Rule 123(2) of its Rules of Procedure,

A.  whereas the Saudi-led coalition has failed to stabilise Yemen, and the number of people killed in the civil war now exceeds 6 000;

B.  whereas extremist forces linked to Daesh and AQAP have continued to fight in southern Yemen and in particular in the environs of Aden;

C.  whereas despite local militias allied to the southern separatist movement having on several occasions repelled Daesh and AQAP forces, the Saudi-led coalition has failed to support these southern-based forces, allowing extremist forces to return to positions they had previously held;

D.  whereas Yemen is now effectively partitioned by way of clan and religious affiliation, while the Saudi-led coalition has ignored reality and has continued to act in its own regional interests rather than in the interests of the Yemeni people;

E.  whereas the Saudi-led coalition has failed to engage constructively with local leaders with a view to a lasting settlement, and the situation is fast deteriorating as those fighting on the ground do not believe they have a voice in the future of Yemen;

F.  whereas severe import restrictions, caused mainly by a naval blockade imposed by the coalition forces during the conflict, have greatly aggravated the humanitarian situation, with commercial fuel imports, needed to power the country’s infrastructures, including hospitals, falling to just 1 % of monthly requirements while shortages of food imports are driving the population to starvation, with over 21 million people, or more than 80 % of the population, now dependent on some kind of humanitarian assistance to meet their basic needs;

G.  whereas numerous European countries have been irresponsibly exporting weapons and ammunition to Saudi Arabia; whereas such exports are in violation of the Arms Trade Treaty and of Common Position 2008/944/CFSP on arms export control, and as such of both EU and international law; whereas the US has backed the Saudi-led coalition with logistical and intelligence support, including crucial aerial refuelling and targeting assistance, as well as billions of dollars’ worth of arms sales;

H.  whereas several parties, including UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Zeid Al Hussein, the UN special adviser on the prevention of genocide and the responsibility to protect, and humanitarian organisations, as well as the European Parliament in its previous resolution, have recommended establishing an independent and impartial international mechanism to investigate alleged violations and abuses of international human rights and humanitarian law in Yemen;

I.  whereas a draft resolution tabled by the Netherlands, calling for a UN mission to document violations by all sides in Yemen and put before the UN Human Rights Council, was withdrawn on 30 September 2015 following intense pressure from Saudi Arabia and owing to insufficient backing from some key countries, including EU Member States; whereas a watered-down resolution lacking any reference to an independent UN inquiry was approved instead;

1.  Express its extreme concern at the worsening humanitarian situation in Yemen, the destruction of infrastructure, including schools and hospitals, as a result of airstrikes or shelling by the Saudi-led coalition and the Houthi insurgents, the lack of basic medical assistance for the population and the extremely poor state of sanitation and lack of food and water, leaving more than 80 % of the population in need of urgent humanitarian assistance;

2.  Urges an immediate end to the attacks on medical structures, and requests that all parties unequivocally commit to avoid targeting civilians or civilian structures, in compliance with international humanitarian law and international human rights law;

3.  Calls for an immediate humanitarian ceasefire so as to allow unlimited access to humanitarian agencies for aid workers so that they can provide assistance, food, medicines and fuel to those most in need; calls on the EU, its Member States and other international donors to respond to the UN humanitarian appeal for Yemen, which has so far received only partial funding;

4.  Condemns the airstrikes carried out by the Saudi-led coalition, and calls on the coalition to suspend them immediately and lift the blockade; calls on the Houthi rebels to put an end to all destabilising actions, in order to enable humanitarian assistance to reach those in need and create the conditions for a dialogue between the parties;

5.  Believes the only possible solution is a political one; calls on the UN and its Special Envoy to do all in their power to facilitate inclusive negotiations, in line with the GCC initiative, that take into consideration the positions of the leaders of the various warring factions and include clan leaders as well as representatives of separatist movements;

6.  Urges the Saudi-led coalition to ensure that the conflict in Yemen ceases to be seen as a battleground between Sunni and Shia, and that negotiations go ahead with Iran to contain the conflict;

7.  Urges the EU Member States to immediately suspend all arms transfers or other forms of military support to Saudi Arabia and its coalition partners that could be used to commit or facilitate serious violations of international human rights in Yemen; urges the VP/HR to initiate an arms embargo against Saudi Arabia at the next Foreign Affairs Council on 5-6 February 2016;

8.  Calls for an urgent, independent and effective international investigation of alleged violations of international human rights and international humanitarian law in Yemen, and urges Member States to support such an investigation in the UN Human Rights Council;

9.  Instructs its President to forward this resolution to the Council, the Commission, the Vice-President of the Commission / High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, the parliaments and governments of the Member States, the Special Envoy of the United Nations Secretary-General to Yemen, the Governments of Yemen and of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, and the parliaments and governments of the states belonging to the Gulf Cooperation Council and to the League of Arab States.

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