Procedure : 2016/2540(RSP)
Document stages in plenary
Document selected : B8-0253/2016

Texts tabled :

B8-0253/2016

Debates :

Votes :

PV 25/02/2016 - 7.14
Explanations of votes

Texts adopted :

P8_TA(2016)0065

MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION
PDF 271kWORD 69k
See also joint motion for a resolution RC-B8-0251/2016
17.2.2016
PE576.617v01-00
 
B8-0253/2016

to wind up the debate on the statement by the Commission

pursuant to Rule 123(2) of the Rules of Procedure


on the introduction of compatible systems for the registration of pet animals across Member States (2016/2540(RSP))


Stefan Eck, Anja Hazekamp, Patrick Le Hyaric, Kostadinka Kuneva, Kateřina Konečná, Marisa Matias on behalf of the GUE/NGL Group

European Parliament resolution on the introduction of compatible systems for the registration of pet animals across Member States (2016/2540(RSP))  
B8-0253/2016

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to Article 43 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) on the functioning of the Common Agricultural Policy,

–  having regard to Article 114 of the TFEU on the establishment and functioning of the single market,

–  having regard to Article 168(4)(b) of the TFEU on measures in the veterinary and phytosanitary fields,

–  having regard to Article 169 of the TFEU on consumer protection measures,

–  having regard to Article 13 of the TFEU, which stipulates that, in formulating and implementing the Union’s policies, the Union and the Member States shall, since animals are sentient beings, pay full regard to the welfare requirements of animals,

–  having regard to Regulation (EU) No 576/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 12 June 2013 on the non-commercial movement of pet animals(1), and Commission Implementing Regulation (EU) No 577/2013 of 28 June 2013 on the model identification documents for the non-commercial movement of dogs, cats and ferrets, the establishment of lists of territories and third countries and the format, layout and language requirements of the declarations attesting compliance with certain conditions provided for in Regulation (EU) No 576/2013(2),

–  having regard to Council Directive 92/65/EEC of 13 July 1992 laying down animal health requirements governing trade in and imports into the Community of animals, semen, ova and embryos not subject to animal health requirements laid down in specific Community rules referred to in Annex A (I) to Directive 90/425/EEC(3),

–  having regard to its resolution of 15 April 2014 on the proposal for a Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on animal health(4),

–  having regard to the conclusions of the 3050th Agriculture and Fisheries Council meeting of 29 November 2010 on the welfare of dogs and cats,

–  having regard to Council Regulation (EC) No 338/97 of 9 December 1996 on the protection of species of wild fauna and flora by regulating trade therein(5),

–  having regard to Commission Implementing Regulation (EU) No 792/2012 of 23 August 2012 laying down rules for the design of permits, certificates and other documents provided for in Council Regulation (EC) No 338/97 on the protection of species of wild fauna and flora by regulating the trade therein and amending Commission Regulation (EC) No 865/2006(6),

–  having regard to European Court of Justice preliminary ruling case C-301/14 of 3 December 2015, which interprets in a broad manner both the concept of ‘economic activity’ within the meaning of Article 1(5) of Council Regulation (EC) No 1/2005 and the concept of ‘dealers engaging in intra-Community trade’ within the meaning of Article 12 of Council Directive 90/425/EEC,

–  having regard to Regulation (EU) No 1143/2014 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 22 October 2014 on the prevention and management of the introduction and spread of invasive alien species(7),

–  having regard to the Joint Declaration on Animal Welfare by Denmark, Germany and the Netherlands of 14 December 2014,

–  having regard to its resolution of 19 May 2015 on safer healthcare in Europe: improving patient safety and fighting antimicrobial resistance(8),

–  having regard to the study conclusions from the Companion Animals Multisectorial Interprofessional and Interdisciplinary Strategic Think Tank on Zoonoses (CALLISTO),

–  having regard to the first outcome of the EU study on dogs and cats involved in commercial practices conducted in 12 Member States, pursuant to the Commission statement attached to the Regulation (EU) 576/2013,

–  having regard to Rule 123(2) of its Rules of Procedure,

A.  whereas the first outcome of the Commission-funded study on the welfare of dogs and cats involved in commercial practices highlighted that while trade in dogs and cats amounts to an annual revenue estimated at 1.3 billion euros, only 13% of purchased companion animals come from professional breeders;

B.  whereas non-governmental organisations, law enforcement agencies, competent authorities and veterinarians have shown evidence of a growing illegal trade in pet animals, with widespread abuse of the Pet Travel Scheme, evasion of controls and document falsification;

C.  whereas growing numbers of people misuse the non-commercial system for purely commercial trade in pet animals;

D.  whereas abuse of the Pet Travel Scheme is now estimated to be the third most profitable illegal trade within the EU after narcotics and weapons;

E.  whereas the illegal trade in pets has been increasingly linked to serious and organised crime by non-governmental organisations, law enforcement agencies and competent authorities;

F.  whereas, despite recent improvements, major concerns still remain in terms of the information provided for Pet Passports, particularly as regards how the age given for an individual animal can be proved to be accurate;

G.  whereas the border-free Schengen Area not only provides for passport-free travel by citizens between Member States, but also facilitates control-free intra-Union travel for animals commonly kept as pets;

H.  whereas pet animals that are traded illegally by breeders are often badly bred, poorly socialised and at increased risk of disease;

I.  whereas 70 % of the new diseases that have emerged in humans over recent decades are of animal origin, and animals commonly kept as pets are carrier hosts of over 100 zoonoses, including rabies;

J.  whereas purchases of pets that are either badly bred or very often less than 15 weeks old, and consequently have poorly developed immune systems and no requirement for vaccination against diseases such as parvovirus, can result in unexpectedly high financial and emotional costs for the purchaser;

K.  whereas the majority of Member States already have some form of harmonisation requirements for the registration and/or standardisation of methods of identification of pet animals; whereas most of these databases are not interconnected, which stands in the way of full traceability when pets are moved over Member State borders;

L.  whereas mandatory pan-European uniform requirements for the identification and registration of pet animals would be a significant step forward in the protection of animal welfare and public and animal health, and would provide effective intra-Union traceability of pet animals;

M.  whereas the illegal trade in wild animals is one of the most extensive transnational organised criminal activities worldwide; whereas more and more exotic or wild animals end up being commonly kept as pets in European homes;

N.  whereas escapes of exotic or wild animals can lead to their uncontrolled spread, which affects the environment, public health and the economy; whereas the majority of exotic and wild animals are not suited to a life in captivity, resulting in massive animal welfare problems;

O.  whereas some Member States (such as the Netherlands and Belgium) already have positive lists for the keeping and/or selling of pet animals, which reduces the number of exotic and wild animals being kept as pets;

1.  Underlines the positive contribution that pet animals make to the lives of millions of individual owners and families across the EU, and reaffirms that owners should be able to travel with their pets in a safe, controlled manner throughout the Union;

2.  Welcomes the improvements to the Pet Travel Scheme introduced by Regulation (EU) No 576/2013, including the added security features contained in the Pet Passport;

3.  Notes with concern the evidence from non-governmental organisations, law enforcement agencies, competent authorities and veterinarians that clearly demonstrates the growing illegal abuse of the Pet Travel Scheme, which is being exploited for commercial purposes;

4.  Notes that the lack of vaccination, appropriate antiviral treatment, and veterinary and sanitary care among illegally traded pets, which in most cases results from unscrupulous breeding methods, often erroneously results in the need to treat them with antibiotics; underlines that this increases the risk of antimicrobial resistance among pets; is concerned that this is an additional risk factor for the development and transmission of antimicrobial resistance in human beings;

5.  Recognises that poor socialisation and habituation are among the leading factors in the behavioural problems of pets, such as separation issues or fear of everyday objects, and present a long-term threat to animal welfare;

6.  Recognises that while many Member States have mandatory systems for the identification and registration of pet animals, there are discrepancies as regards the type of information held, the animals covered by the identification and registration requirements, and the level of governance at which the information is held;

7.  Calls on the Commission to facilitate the establishment of a system for mandatory identification and registration of pet animals, enabling access to data on pet animals registered at national level in order to create an EU-wide traceability mechanism; underlines that the personal data of owners and sellers of pet animals should be respected in line with the relevant EU legal standards on personal data protection;

8.  Recognises that a harmonisation of identification and registration requirements for dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) and cats (Felis silvestris catus) would reduce the scope for document falsification and illegal trading, thus improving animal welfare and protecting public and animal health and providing for effective intra-Union traceability;

9.  Notes with concern the growing illegal trade in exotic and wild animals commonly kept as pets;

10.  Recognises that a harmonisation of identification and registration requirements for exotic and wild animals currently kept as pets would reduce the scope for illegal trade, would prevent severe animal suffering, would better protect public and animal health and welfare and biodiversity and should also provide for effective intra-Union traceability;

11.  Recognises that positive lists of exotic and wild animals that have no complex needs (e.g. behavioural needs, diet, handling, specialised care) and can be kept as pets by the average owner without compromising the health of the animal is a necessity in this respect;

12.  Calls on the Commission, upon the entry into force of the Regulation on Transmissible Animal Diseases, to adopt a delegated act forthwith, laying down rules pursuant to Articles 108, 109 and 118 of the regulation with detailed, harmonised requirements for the means and methods of identification and registration of dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) and cats (Felis silvestris catus);

13.  Calls on the Commission, upon the entry into force of the Regulation on Transmissible Animal Diseases, to consider adopting delegated acts laying down rules pursuant to Articles 108, 109 and 118 of the regulation with detailed, harmonised requirements for the means and methods of identification and registration of the following pet animals, as defined by Annex 1 of the same Regulation: reptiles, birds (specimens of avian species other than domestic fowl, turkeys, guinea fowl, ducks, geese, quails, pigeons, pheasants, partridges and ratites), rodents and rabbits other than those intended for food production;

14.  Calls on the Commission to ensure that the requirements in paragraphs 12 and 13 ensure that the disease prevention and control measures provided for in the Regulation on Transmissible Animal Diseases are efficiently applied and that they facilitate the traceability of these pet animals, their movements within and between Member States and their entry into the Union;

15.  Calls on the Commission to explore the additional measures to combat the illegal trade in pet animals contained in the conclusions of the study on the welfare of dogs and cats involved in commercial practices, and to publish those conclusions without delay;

16.  Instructs its President to forward this resolution to the Council and the Commission.

(1)

OJ L 178, 28.6.2013, p. 1.

(2)

OJ L 178, 28.6.2013, p. 109.

(3)

OJ L 268, 14.9.1992, p. 54.

(4)

Texts adopted, P7_TA(2014)0381.

(5)

OJ L 61, 3.3.1997, p. 1.

(6)

OJ L 242, 7.9.2012, p. 13.

(7)

OJ L 317, 4.11.2014, p. 35.

(8)

Texts adopted, P8_TA(2015)0197.

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