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Parliamentary questions
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18 August 2017
E-004386/2017(ASW)
Answer given by Vice-President Ansip on behalf of the Commission
Question reference: E-004386/2017

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)(1) focuses on the protection of natural persons with regard to the processing of personal data and on the free movement of such data. The GDPR does not cover non-personal data nor does it specifically address obstacles to the free movement of personal data based on reasons other than the protection of personal data.

Examples for such obstacles are outdated or disproportionate regulatory requirements for keeping certain kinds of data within specific Member States or regions; uncertainty about the legal regimes applicable to data which inhibits intra-EU flow of data; as well as a more general lack of trust in the use of e-services, especially in a cross-border context.

The Commission is working with Member States to ensure that citizens can transfer their basic medical information electronically when receiving treatment in another Member State and use e-prescriptions to get their medication dispensed. The Commission intends to adopt a communication in 2017 addressing the need and scope for further measures in the area of digital health and care, in line with the GDPR and legislation on patient rights and e-identification.

As regards the general lack of trust in the use of e-services, especially across national borders due to cybersecurity concerns, the Commission is working on a cybersecurity package to be proposed in September 2017 to address the risks due to cyber-attacks and to increase confidence and trust in the digital economy.

(1)Regulation (EU) 2016/679 of the European parliament and of the Council of 27 April 2016 on the protection of natural persons with regard to the processing of personal data and on the free movement of such data, and repealing Directive 95/46/European Commission (General Data Protection Regulation).

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