Index 
Texts adopted
Thursday, 30 January 2020 - BrusselsFinal edition
Verification of credentials
 Appointment of a member of the Single Resolution Board
 Appointment of a member of the Single Resolution Board
 Appointment of the Vice-Chair of the Single Resolution Board
 Appointment of the Executive Director of the European Banking Authority
 Common charger for mobile radio equipment
 Gender pay gap

Verification of credentials
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Decision
Annex
European Parliament decision of 30 January 2020 on the verification of credentials (2019/2180(REG))
P9_TA(2020)0019A9-0015/2020

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to Articles 10(1), 14(2) and 14(3) of the Treaty on the European Union,

–  having regard to the Act of 20 September 1976 concerning the election of the Members of the European Parliament by direct universal suffrage, annexed to Council Decision 76/787/ECSC, EEC, Euratom of 20 September 1976(1), as amended and renumbered by Council Decision 2002/772/EC, Euratom of 25 June 2002 and 23 September 2002(2),

–  having regard to its Decision 2005/684/EC, Euratom of 28 September 2005 adopting the Statute for Members of the European Parliament(3), in particular Articles 2(1) and 3(1) thereof,

–  having regard to Council Directive 93/109/EC of 6 December 1993 laying down detailed arrangements for the exercise of the right to vote and stand as a candidate in elections to the European Parliament for citizens of the Union residing in a Member State of which they are not nationals(4), as amended by Council Directive 2013/1/EU of 20 December 2012(5),

–  having regard to European Council Decision 2013/312/EU of 28 June 2013 establishing the composition of the European Parliament(6) and to European Council Decision (EU) 2018/937 of 28 June 2018 establishing the composition of the European Parliament(7),

–  having regard to the judgments of the Court of Justice of the European Union of 7 July 2005, 30 April 2009 and 19 December 2019(8),

–  having regard to the official notifications from the competent authorities of the Member States of the results of the elections to the European Parliament,

–  having regard to the decision of 13 June 2019 of the Spanish Junta Electoral Central proclaiming the candidates elected to the European Parliament in the elections held on 26 May 2019 and published in the Boletín Oficial del Estado on 14 June 2019(9);

–  having regard to Rules 3, 4 and 11 of and Annex I to its Rules of Procedure,

–  having regard to the report of the Committee on Legal Affairs (A9-0015/2020),

A.  whereas pursuant to Article 12 of the Act of 20 September 1976, the European Parliament shall verify the credentials of Members of the European Parliament and for this purpose it shall take note of the results declared officially by the Member States and shall rule on any disputes which may arise out of the provisions of the 1976 Act other than those arising out of the national provisions to which that 1976 Act refers;

B.  whereas all of the Member States have notified Parliament of the names of elected Members pursuant to Rule 3(1) of the Rules of Procedure, not all names have been communicated;

C.  whereas according to Article 3 of European Council Decision 2013/312/EU of 28 June 2013 and Article 3(2) of European Council Decision (EU) 2018/937 of 28 June 2018, the number of representatives in the European Parliament allocated to Spain is currently 54, while the notification by the Spanish competent authorities contains only 51 names; whereas on the basis of the case-law of the Court of Justice of the European Union(10) and in accordance with Article 12 of the Act of 20 September 1976, Parliament takes note of the decision of 13 June 2019 by the Junta Electoral Central proclaiming the candidates elected to Parliament in the elections held on 26 May 2019 and published in the Boletín Oficial del Estado on 14 June 2019 for the purpose of establishing the list of elected Members; whereas, therefore, the number of representatives in the European Parliament elected in Spain has been 54;

D.  whereas objections to the election of some Members of the European Parliament may be considered in Member States in accordance with national legislation and these procedures could result in the annulment of the election of the Members concerned;

E.  whereas some Member States have forwarded late, and others have not yet forwarded at all, the lists of any substitutes, together with their ranking in accordance with the results of the vote, as required under Rule 3(3) of the Rules of Procedure;

F.  whereas in accordance with Rule 3(3) of the Rules of Procedure, the validity of the mandate of a Member of the European Parliament may not be confirmed unless the written declaration on the absence of any incompatible office and the written declaration of financial interests required under Rule 3 of and Annex I to the Rules of Procedure have been submitted;

G.  whereas Article 7(1) and (2) of the 1976 Act clearly set out the offices that are incompatible with the office of Member of the European Parliament;

H.  whereas under Rule 11 of and Annex I to the Rules of Procedure, each Member of the European Parliament is required to make a detailed declaration concerning: (a) his or her occupations during the three-year period before he or she took up office with the Parliament, his or her membership during that period of any boards or committees of companies, non-governmental organisations, associations or other bodies established in law; (b) any salary which the Member receives for the exercise of a mandate in another parliament; (c) any regular remunerated activity which the Member undertakes alongside the exercise of his or her office, whether as an employee or as a self-employed person; (d) membership of any boards or committees of any companies, non-governmental organisations, associations or other bodies established in law, or any other relevant outside activity that the Member undertakes, whether the membership or activity in question is remunerated or unremunerated; (e) any occasional remunerated outside activity, if the total remuneration of all the Member’s occasional outside activities exceeds EUR 5 000 in a calendar year; (f) any holding in any company or partnership, where there are potential public policy implications or where that holding gives the Member significant influence over the affairs of the body in question; (g) any support, whether financial or in terms of staff or material, additional to that provided by Parliament and granted to the Member in connection with his or her political activities by third parties, whose identity shall be disclosed; (h) any other financial interests which might influence the performance of the Member’s duties. For each of these items, the Member is required to indicate, where appropriate, whether it is remunerated or not and, for items (a), (c), (d), (e) and (f), Members shall also indicate the relevant income category; whereas the information provided is published on Parliament’s website;

I.  whereas the mandate of the representatives elected in the United Kingdom is based upon its membership of the European Union; whereas, as a consequence and by virtue of Article 3(2), third subparagraph of European Council Decision (EU) 2018/937 of 28 June 2018, the mandate of these Members of the European Parliament will automatically come to an end if and on the day on which the withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union becomes legally effective;

J.  whereas, by virtue of the same provisions of European Council Decision (EU) 2018/937, the withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union will not cause a vacancy under Article 13 of the 1976 Act and Rule 4 of the Rules of Procedure and consequently the end of the mandate of the representatives elected in the United Kingdom will be automatic and will occur without the need of being declared by the European Parliament;

K.  whereas in the case of the withdrawal of the United Kingdom, the number of representatives in the European Parliament per Member State after the withdrawal becomes effective has been set by European Council Decision (EU) 2018/937 and will result in representatives of some Member States filling additional seats resulting from the number of seats allocated pursuant to the first and second subparagraphs of Article 3(2) of that Decision;

L.  whereas some Member States have adopted laws or regulations laying down the conditions for the organisation of elections with transnational lists;

M.  whereas the nationals of certain Member States who have been living in another country for a given period of time can be deprived of the right to vote in their home Member State (disenfranchisement); whereas in some cases this may also entail the deprivation of the right to stand as a candidate;

1.  Declares valid, subject to any decisions by the competent authorities before which the election results may have been disputed, the mandate of the Members of the European Parliament listed in the Annex to this decision;

2.  Repeats its request to the competent national authorities not only to promptly notify it of all the names of the elected candidates but also to forward the names of any substitutes, together with their ranking in accordance with the results of the vote, and urges those who are yet to make the relevant notifications to do so without delay;

3.  Calls on the competent authorities of the Member States to complete without delay the examination of the possible disputes referred to them, and to notify Parliament of the results; calls for a transparent evaluation of the conduct of the European elections;

4.  Acknowledges that the mandate of the representatives elected in the United Kingdom will automatically cease if and on the day on which the withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union becomes legally effective;

5.  In such an event, expects that relevant notifications in order to fill the additional seats will be made by the competent authorities of the Member States without undue delay;

6.  Considers that disenfranchisement produces a potential discouraging effect on the citizens who intend to exercise the right of free movement within the EU (Article 20(2)(a) TFEU) and have repercussions on those citizens who have exercised that same right; finds that disenfranchisement violates the principle of universal suffrage (Article 14(3) TEU and Article 1(3) of the 1976 Act); moreover, expresses concerns regarding situations in which citizens are hampered in exercising their voting rights owing to a lack of clarity of procedures, including in relation to voting lists, requirements on physical presence, or difficulties in obtaining access to the necessary information from the Member States to exercise their voting rights; takes the view that under no circumstances may disenfranchisement or requirements that disproportionately hamper the exercise of voting rights apply to European elections and calls on the Commission to ensure that none of the Member States provides for that possibility;

7.  Calls on Member States in which such problems may have arisen to simplify the registration formalities relating to the participation of nationals of other Member States in the European elections, whether as voters or as candidates, in particular by removing unnecessary administrative barriers so as to make the rights referred to under Article 20(2)(a) and (b) TFEU effective; requests that the Commission ensure that the practices of the Member States comply with EU law;

8.  Instructs its President to forward this decision to the Commission and to the competent national authorities and the parliaments of the Member States.

ANNEX: List of Members of the European Parliament whose mandate is declared valid

(2 July 2019)

Belgium (21 Members)

ANNEMANS Gerolf

ARENA Maria

ARIMONT Pascal

BOTENGA Marc

BOURGEOIS Geert

BRICMONT Saskia

CHASTEL Olivier

DE MAN Filip

DE SUTTER Petra

FRANSSEN Cindy

KANKO Assita

LAMBERTS Philippe

LUTGEN Benoît

PEETERS Kris

RIES Frédérique

TARABELLA Marc

VAN BREMPT Kathleen

VAN OVERTVELDT Johan

VANDENDRIESSCHE Tom

VAUTMANS Hilde

VERHOFSTADT Guy

MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT BY MEMBER STATE

(2 July 2019)

Bulgaria (17 Members)

ADEMOV Asim

ALEXANDROV YORDANOV Alexander

ALIEVA-VELI Atidzhe

DZHAMBAZKI Angel

HRISTOV Ivo

KANEV Radan

KOVATCHEV Andrey

KYUCHYUK Ilhan

MAYDELL Eva

MIHAYLOVA Iskra

NOVAKOV Andrey

PENKOVA Tsvetelina

RADEV Emil

SLABAKOV Andrey

STANISHEV Sergei

VITANOV Petar

YONCHEVA Elena

MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT BY MEMBER STATE

(2 July 2019)

Czech Republic (21 Members)

BLAŠKO Hynek

CHARANZOVÁ Dita

DAVID Ivan

DLABAJOVÁ Martina

GREGOROVÁ Markéta

HLAVÁČEK Martin

KNOTEK Ondřej

KOLAJA Marcel

KONEČNÁ Kateřina

KOVAŘÍK Ondřej

MAXOVÁ Radka

NIEDERMAYER Luděk

PEKSA Mikuláš

POLČÁK Stanislav

POSPÍŠIL Jiří

ŠOJDROVÁ Michaela

TOŠENOVSKÝ Evžen

VONDRA Alexandr

VRECIONOVÁ Veronika

ZAHRADIL Jan

ZDECHOVSKÝ Tomáš

MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT BY MEMBER STATE

(2 July 2019)

Denmark (13 Members)

AUKEN Margrete

CHRISTENSEN Asger

FUGLSANG Niels

GADE Søren

KOFOD Peter

LØKKEGAARD Morten

MELCHIOR Karen

PETER-HANSEN Kira Marie

PETERSEN Morten

SCHALDEMOSE Christel

VILLUMSEN Nikolaj

VIND Marianne (*)

WEISS Pernille

(*) Mandate valid with effect from 2 July 2019, i.e. the date indicated in the notification by the competent national authority of the election of Ms Marianne VIND to replace Mr Jeppe KOFOD, whose decision to take up the office of Minister of the Danish government and consequently not to initiate his mandate as Member of the European Parliament was notified by the Danish national authorities on 27 June 2019.

MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT BY MEMBER STATE

(2 July 2019)

Germany (96 Members)

ANDERSON Christine

ANDRESEN Rasmus

BARLEY Katarina

BECK Gunnar

BEER Nicola

BENTELE Hildegard

BERG Lars Patrick

BERGER Stefan

BISCHOFF Gabriele

BLOSS Michael

BOESELAGER Damian

BREYER Patrick

BUCHHEIT Markus

BUCHNER Klaus

BULLMAN Udo

BURKHARDT Delara

BUSCHMANN Martin

BÜTIKOFER Reinhard

CASPARY Daniel

CAVAZZINI Anna

DEMIREL Özlem

DEPARNAY-GRUNENBERG Anna

DOLESCHAL Christian

DÜPONT Lena

EHLER Christian

ERNST Cornelia

EROGLU Engin

ERTUG Ismail

FERBER Markus

FEST Nicolaus

FRANZ Romeo

FREUND Daniel

GAHLER Michael

GEBHARDT Evelyne

GEESE Alexandra

GEIER Jens

GEUKING Helmut

GIEGOLD Sven

GIESEKE Jens

GLÜCK Andreas

HAHN Henrike

HAHN Svenja

HÄUSLING Martin

HERBST Niclas

HERZBERGER-FOFANA Pierrette

HOHLMEIER Monika

JAHR Peter

KAMMEREVERT Petra

KELLER Ska

KÖRNER Moritz

KÖSTER Dietmar

KRAH Maximilian

KREHL Constanze

KUHS Joachim

LAGODINSKY Sergey

LANGE Bernd

LANGENSIEPEN Katrin

LIESE Peter

LIMMER Sylvia

LINS Norbert

MARQUARDT Erik

McALLISTER David

MEUTHEN Jörg

MICHELS Martina

MORTLER Marlene

MÜLLER Ulrike

NEUMANN Hannah

NEUSER Norbert

NIEBLER Angelika

NIENASS Niklas

NOICHL Maria

OETJEN Jan-Christoph

PAULUS Jutta

PIEPER Markus

RADTKE Dennis

REIL Guido

REINTKE Terry

SCHIRDEWAN Martin

SCHNEIDER Christine

SCHOLZ Helmut

SCHULZE Sven

SCHUSTER Joachim

SCHWAB Andreas

SEEKATZ Ralf

SEMSROTT Nico

SIMON Sven

SIPPEL Birgit

SONNEBORN Martin

VERHEYEN Sabine

VON CRAMON-TAUBADEL Viola

VOSS Axel

WALSMANN Marion

WEBER Manfred

WIELAND Rainer

WÖLKEN Tiemo

ZIMNIOK Bernhard

MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT BY MEMBER STATE

(2 July 2019)

Estonia (6 Members)

ANSIP Andrus

KALJURAND Marina

MADISON Jaak

MIKSER Sven

PAET Urmas

TOOM Yana

MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT BY MEMBER STATE

(2 July 2019)

Ireland (11 Members)

CARTHY Matt

CUFFE Ciarán

DALY Clare

FITZGERALD Frances

FLANAGAN Luke Ming

KELLEHER Billy

KELLY Seán

McGUINNESS Mairead

O’SULLIVAN Grace

WALLACE Mick

WALSH Maria

MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT BY MEMBER STATE

(2 July 2019)

Greece (21 Members)

ANDROULAKIS Nikos

ARVANITIS Konstantinos

ASIMAKOPOULOU Anna-Michelle

FRAGKOS Emmanouil (*)

GEORGOULIS Alexis

KAILI Eva

KEFALOGIANNIS Manolis

KOKKALIS Petros

KONSTANTINOU Athanasios

KOULOGLOU Stelios

KOUNTOURA Elena

KYMPOUROPOULOS Stelios

KYRTSOS Georgios

LAGOS Ioannis

MEIMARAKIS Vangelis

NIKOLAOU-ALAVANOS Lefteris

PAPADAKIS Kostas

PAPADIMOULIS Dimitrios

SPYRAKI Maria

VELOPOULOS Kyriakos (**)

VOZEMBERG-VRIONIDI Elissavet

ZAGORAKIS Theodoros

(*) Mandate valid with effect from 10 July 2019, i.e. the date of the notification by the competent national authority of the election of Mr Emmanouil FRAGKOS to replace Mr Kyriakos VELOPOULOS.

(**) Mr Kyriakos VELOPOULOS’ mandate ended on 6 July 2019.

MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT BY MEMBER STATE

(2 July 2019)

Spain (54 Members)

AGUILAR Mazaly

AGUILERA Clara

ARIAS ECHEVERRÍA Pablo

BARRENA ARZA Pernando

BAUZÁ DÍAZ José Ramón

BENJUMEA BENJUMEA Isabel

BILBAO BARANDICA Izaskun

BUXADÉ VILLALBA Jorge

CAÑAS Jordi

del CASTILLO VERA Pilar

DURÁ FERRANDIS Estrella (*)

ESTARÀS FERRAGUT Rosa

FERNÁNDEZ Jonás

GÁLVEZ MUÑOZ Lina

GARCÍA DEL BLANCO Ibán

GARCÍA-MARGALLO Y MARFIL José Manuel

GARCÍA MUÑOZ Isabel

GARCÍA PÉREZ Iratxe

GARDIAZABAL RUBIAL Eider

GARICANO Luis

GONZÁLEZ Mónica Silvana

GONZÁLEZ CASARES Nicolás

GONZÁLEZ PONS Esteban

HOMS GINEL Alicia

LÓPEZ Javi

LÓPEZ AGUILAR Juan Fernando

LÓPEZ GIL Leopoldo

LÓPEZ-ISTÚRIZ WHITE Antonio

LUENA César

MAESTRE MARTÍN DE ALMAGRO Cristina

MALDONADO LÓPEZ Adriana

MILLÁN MON Francisco José

MONTSERRAT Dolors

MORENO SÁNCHEZ Javier

NART Javier

PAGAZAURTUNDÚA Maite

PINEDA Manu

REGO Sira

RIBA I GINER Diana

RODRÍGUEZ PALOP Eugenia

RODRÍGUEZ-PIÑERO Inma

RODRÍGUEZ RAMOS María Soraya

RUIZ DEVESA Domènec

SÁNCHEZ AMOR Nacho

SOLÍS PÉREZ Susana

TERTSCH Hermann

URBÁN CRESPO Miguel

URTASUN Ernest

VILLANUEVA RUIZ Idoia

ZARZALEJOS Javier

ZOIDO ÁLVAREZ Juan Ignacio

(*) Mandate valid with effect from 2 July 2019 further to the notification by the competent national authority of the election of Ms Estrella DURÁ FERRANDIS to replace Mr Josep BORRELL FONTELLES, who had renounced his seat on 26 June 2019 and had not submitted the declarations necessary for the verification of his credentials.

MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT BY MEMBER STATE

(2 July 2019)

France (74 Members)

ALFONSI François

ANDRIEU Eric

ANDROUËT Mathilde

AUBRY Manon

BARDELLA Jordan

BAY Nicolas

BEIGNEUX Aurelia

BELLAMY François-Xavier

BIJOUX Stéphane

BILDE Dominique

BITEAU Benoît

BOMPARD Manuel

BOYER Gilles

BRUNA Annika

BRUNET Sylvie

CANFIN Pascal

CARÊME Damien

CHABAUD Catherine

CHAIBI Leïla

COLIN-OESTERLÉ Nathalie

COLLARD Gilbert

CORMAND David

DANJEAN Arnaud

DECERLE Jérémy

DELBOS-CORFIELD Gwendoline

DELLI Karima

DIDIER Geoffroy

DURAND Pascal

EVREN Agnès

FARRENG Laurence

GARRAUD Jean-Paul

GLUCKSMANN Raphaël

GRISET Catherine

GRUDLER Christophe

GUETTA Bernard

GUILLAUME Sylvie

HAYER Valerie

HORTEFEUX Brice

JADOT Yannick

JALKH Jean-François

JAMET France

JORON Virginie

JUVIN Herve

KARLESKIND Pierre

KELLER Fabienne

LALUCQ Aurore

LAPORTE Hélène

LARROUTUROU Pierre

LEBRETON Gilles

LECHANTEUX Julie

LOISEAU Nathalie

MARIANI Thierry

MAUREL Emmanuel

MÉLIN Joëlle

MORANO Nadine

OLIVIER Philippe

OMARJEE Younous

PELLETIER Anne-Sophie

PIRBAKAS Maxette

RIQUET Dominique

RIVASI Michèle

RIVIÈRE Jérôme

ROOSE Caroline

ROUGÉ André

SANDER Anne

SATOURI Mounir

SÉJOURNÉ Stéphane

TOLLERET Irène

TOUSSAINT Marie

TRILLET-LENOIR Véronique

VEDRENNE Marie-Pierre

YENBOU Salima

YON-COURTIN Stéphanie

ZACHAROPOULOU Chrysoula

MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT BY MEMBER STATE

(2 July 2019)

Croatia (11 Members)

BORZAN Biljana

FLEGO Valter

GLAVAK Sunčana (*)

KOLAKUŠIĆ Mislav

MATIĆ Predrag Fred

PICULA Tonino

RESSLER Karlo

SINČIĆ Ivan Vilibor

SOKOL Tomislav

ŠUICA Dubravka (**)

TOMAŠIĆ Ruža

ZOVKO Željana

(*) Mandate valid with effect from 1 December 2019, the date indicated in the notification by the competent national authority of the election of Ms Sunčana GLAVAK to replace Ms Dubravka ŠUICA.

(**)Ms Dubravka ŠUICA’s mandate ended on 30 November 2019.

MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT BY MEMBER STATE

(2 July 2019)

Italy (73 Members)

ADINOLFI Isabella

ADINOLFI Matteo

BALDASSARRE Simona

BARTOLO Pietro

BASSO Alessandra

BEGHIN Tiziana

BENIFEI Brando

BERLUSCONI Silvio

BIZZOTTO Mara

BONAFÈ Simona

BONFRISCO Anna

BORCHIA Paolo

CALENDA Carlo

CAMPOMENOSI Marco

CAROPPO Andrea

CASANOVA Massimo

CASTALDO Fabio Massimo

CECCARDI Susanna

CHINNICI Caterina

CIOCCA Angelo

CONTE Rosanna

CORRAO Ignazio

COZZOLINO Andrea

D’AMATO Rosa

DANTI Nicola (*)

DA RE Gianantonio

DE CASTRO Paolo

DONATO Francesca

DORFMANN Herbert

DREOSTO Marco

EVI Eleonora

FERRANDINO Giuseppe

FERRARA Laura

FIDANZA Carlo

FIOCCHI Pietro

FITTO Raffaele

FURORE Mario

GANCIA Gianna

GEMMA Chiara

GIARRUSSO Dino

GRANT Valentino

GUALMINI Elisabetta

GUALTIERI Roberto (**)

LANCINI Danilo Oscar

LIZZI Elena

MAJORINO Pierfrancesco

MARTUSCIELLO Fulvio

MILAZZO Giuseppe

MORETTI Alessandra

PANZA Alessandro

PATRICIELLO Aldo

PEDICINI Piernicola

PICIERNO Pina

PIGNEDOLI Sabrina

PISAPIA Giuliano

PROCACCINI Nicola

REGIMENTI Luisa

RINALDI Antonio Maria

ROBERTI Franco

RONDINELLI Daniela

SALINI Massimiliano

SARDONE Silvia

SASSOLI David Maria

SMERIGLIO Massimiliano

STANCANELLI Raffaele

TAJANI Antonio

TARDINO Annalisa

TINAGLI Irene

TOIA Patrizia

TOVAGLIERI Isabella

VUOLO Lucia

ZAMBELLI Stefania

ZANNI Marco

ZULLO Marco

(*) Mandate valid with effect from 5 September 2019, the date indicated in the notification by the competent national authority of the election of Mr Nicola DANTI to replace Mr Roberto GUALTIERI.

(**) Mr Roberto GUALTIERI’s mandate ended on 4 September 2019.

MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT BY MEMBER STATE

(2 July 2019)

Cyprus (6 Members)

CHRISTOFOROU Lefteris

FOURLAS Loukas

GEORGIOU Giorgios

KIZILYÜREK Niyazi

MAVRIDES Costas

PAPADAKIS Demetris

MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT BY MEMBER STATE

(2 July 2019)

Latvia (8 Members)

AMERIKS Andris

IJABS Ivars

KALNIETE Sandra

MELBĀRDE Dace

UŠAKOVS Nils

VAIDERE Inese (*)

ZĪLE Roberts

ŽDANOKA Tatjana

(*) Mandate valid with effect from 2 July 2019 further to the notification by the competent national authority of the election of Ms Inese VAIDERE to replace Mr Valdis DOMBROVSKIS, who had renounced his seat before the beginning of the 9th Legislature and had not submitted the declarations necessary for the verification of his credentials.

MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT BY MEMBER STATE

(2 July 2019)

Lithuania (11 Members)

AUŠTREVIČIUS Petras

BLINKEVIČIŪTĖ Vilija

JAKELIŪNAS Stasys

JUKNEVIČIENĖ Rasa

KUBILIUS Andrius

MALDEIKIENĖ Aušra

MAŽYLIS Liudas

OLEKAS Juozas

ROPĖ Bronis

TOMAŠEVSKI Valdemar

USPASKICH Viktor

MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT BY MEMBER STATE

(2 July 2019)

Luxembourg (6 Members)

ANGEL Marc (*)

GOERENS Charles

HANSEN Christophe

METZ Tilly

SCHMIT Nicolas (**)

SEMEDO Monica

WISELER-LIMA Isabel

(*) Mandate valid with effect from 10 December 2019, the date indicated in the official notification from national authorities of the election of Mr Marc ANGEL to replace Mr Nicolas SCHMIT.

(**) Mr Nicolas SCHMIT’s mandate ended on 30 November 2019.

MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT BY MEMBER STATE

(2 July 2019)

Hungary (21 Members)

ARA-KOVÁCS Attila

BOCSKOR Andrea

CSEH Katalin

DELI Andor

DEUTSCH Tamás

DOBREV Klára

DONÁTH Anna Júlia

GÁL Kinga

GYÖNGYÖSI Márton

GYŐRI Enikő

GYÜRK András

HIDVÉGHI Balázs

HÖLVÉNYI György

JÁRÓKA Lívia

KÓSA Ádám

MOLNÁR Csaba

RÓNAI Sándor

SZÁJER József

TÓTH Edina

TRÓCSÁNYI László

UJHELYI István

MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT BY MEMBER STATE

(2 July 2019)

Malta (6 Members)

AGIUS SALIBA Alex

CASA David

CUTAJAR Josianne

DALLI Miriam

METSOLA Roberta

SANT Alfred

MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT BY MEMBER STATE

(2 July 2019)

Netherlands (26 Members)

AZMANI Malik

BERENDSEN Tom

CHAHIM Mohammed

van DALEN Peter

EICKHOUT Bas

EPPINK Derk Jan

HAZEKAMP Anja

HUITEMA Jan

JONGERIUS Agnes Maria

de LANGE Esther

LENAERS Jeroen

MANDERS Antonius

NAGTEGAAL Caroline

PIRI Kati

RAFAELA Samira

ROOKEN Rob

ROOS Rob

RUISSEN Bert-Jan

SCHREIJER-PIERIK Annie

SCHREINEMACHER Liesje

van SPARRENTAK Kim

STRIK Tineke

TANG Paul

TAX Vera

in 't VELD Sophia

WOLTERS Lara (*)

(*) Mandate valid with effect from 4 July 2019, the date of the notification by the competent national authority of the election of Ms Lara WOLTERS to replace Mr Frans TIMMERMANS, who had not submitted the declarations necessary for the verification of his credentials and had opted to keep the office of European Commissioner.

MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT BY MEMBER STATE

(2 July 2019)

Austria (18 Members)

BERNHUBER Alexander

EDTSTADLER Karoline (*)

GAMON Claudia

HAIDER Roman

HEIDE Hannes

KARAS Othmar

MANDL Lukas

MAYER Georg

REGNER Evelyn

SCHIEDER Andreas

SCHMIEDTBAUER Simone

SIDL Günther

THALER Barbara

VANA Monika

VILIMSKY Harald

VOLLATH Bettina

WIENER Sarah

WINZIG Angelika

(*) Ms Karoline EDTSTADLER’s mandate ended on 6 January 2020.

MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT BY MEMBER STATE

(2 July 2019)

Poland (51 Members)

ADAMOWICZ Magdalena

ARŁUKOWICZ Bartosz

BALT Marek Paweł

BELKA Marek

BIEDROŃ Robert

BIELAN Adam

BRUDZIŃSKI Joachim Stanisław

BUZEK Jerzy

CIMOSZEWICZ Włodzimierz

CZARNECKI Ryszard

DUDA Jarosław

FOTYGA Anna

FRANKOWSKI Tomasz

HALICKI Andrzej

HETMAN Krzysztof

HÜBNER Danuta Maria

JAKI Patryk

JARUBAS Adam

JURGIEL Krzysztof

KALINOWSKI Jarosław

KARSKI Karol

KEMPA Beata

KLOC Izabela-Helena

KOHUT Łukasz

KOPACZ Ewa

KOPCIŃSKA Joanna

KRASNODĘBSKI Zdzisław

KRUK Elżbieta

KUŹMIUK Zbigniew

LEGUTKO Ryszard Antoni

LEWANDOWSKI Janusz

LIBERADZKI Bogusław

ŁUKACIJEWSKA Elżbieta Katarzyna

MAZUREK Beata

MILLER Leszek

MOŻDŻANOWSKA Andżelika Anna

OCHOJSKA Janina

OLBRYCHT Jan

PORĘBA Tomasz Piotr

RAFALSKA Elżbieta

RZOŃCA Bogdan

SARYUSZ-WOLSKI Jacek

SIKORSKI Radosław

SPUREK Sylwia

SZYDŁO Beata

THUN UND HOHENSTEIN Róża

TOBISZOWSKI Grzegorz

WASZCZYKOWSKI Witold Jan

WIŚNIEWSKA Jadwiga

ZALEWSKA Anna

ZŁOTOWSKI Kosma

MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT BY MEMBER STATE

(2 July 2019)

Portugal (21 Members)

AMARO Álvaro

CARVALHAIS Isabel (*)

CARVALHO Maria de Graça

CERDAS Sara

DIONÍSIO BRADFORD André Jorge (**)

FERNANDES José Manuel

FERREIRA João

GUERREIRO Francisco

GUSMÃO José

LEITÃO MARQUES Maria Manuel

MARQUES Margarida

MARQUES Pedro

MATIAS Marisa

MELO Nuno

MONTEIRO DE AGUIAR Cláudia

PEREIRA Lídia

PEREIRA Sandra

PIZARRO Manuel

RANGEL Paulo

SANTOS Isabel

SILVA PEREIRA Pedro

ZORRINHO Carlos

(*) Mandate valid with effect from 3 September 2019, the date of the notification by the competent national authority of the election of Ms Isabel CARVALHAIS to replace Mr André Jorge DIONÍSIO BRADFORD.

(**) Mr André Jorge DIONÍSIO BRADFORD’s mandate ended on 18 July 2019.

MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT BY MEMBER STATE

(2 July 2019)

Romania (32 Members)

ARMAND Clotilde

AVRAM Carmen

BĂSESCU Traian

BENEA Adrian-Dragoş

BLAGA Vasile

BOGDAN Ioan-Rareş

BOTOŞ Vlad-Marius

BUDA Daniel

BUŞOI Cristian-Silviu

CIOLOŞ Dacian

CIUHODARU Tudor

CREŢU Corina

FALCĂ Gheorghe

GHINEA Cristian

GRAPINI Maria

HAVA Mircea-Gheorghe

MANDA Claudiu

MARINESCU Marian-Jean

MOTREANU Dan-Ştefan

MUREȘAN Siegfried

NICA Dan

NISTOR Gheorghe-Vlad (*)

PÎSLARU Dragoş

PLUMB Rovana

ŞTEFĂNUȚĂ Nicolae

STRUGARIU Ramona

TERHEŞ Cristian

TOMAC Eugen

TUDORACHE Dragoş

TUDOSE Mihai

VĂLEAN Adina-Ioana (**)

VINCZE Loránt

WINKLER Iuliu

(*) Mandate valid with effect from 2 December 2019, the date indicated in the notification by the competent national authority of the election of Mr Gheorghe-Vlad NISTOR to replace Ms Adina-Ioana VĂLEAN.

(**) Ms Adina-Ioana VĂLEAN’s mandate ended on 30 November 2019.

MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT BY MEMBER STATE

(2 July 2019)

Slovenia (8 Members)

BOGOVIČ Franc

BRGLEZ Milan

FAJON Tanja

GROŠELJ Klemen

JOVEVA Irena

NOVAK Ljudmila

TOMC Romana

ZVER Milan

MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT BY MEMBER STATE

(2 July 2019)

Slovakia (13 Members)

BEŇOVÁ Monika

BILČÍK Vladimír

ČÍŽ Miroslav

ĎURIŠ NICHOLSONOVÁ Lucia

HAJŠEL Robert

HOJSÍK Martin

JURZYKA Eugen

POLLÁK Peter

RADAČOVSKÝ Miroslav

ŠIMEČKA Michal

ŠTEFANEC Ivan

UHRÍK Milan

WIEZIK Michal

MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT BY MEMBER STATE

(2 July 2019)

Finland (13 Members)

HAKKARAINEN Teuvo

HAUTALA Heidi

HEINÄLUOMA Eero

HUHTASAARI Laura

KATAINEN Elsi

KUMPULA-NATRI Miapetra

MODIG Silvia

NIINISTÖ Ville

PEKKARINEN Mauri

PIETIKÄINEN Sirpa

SARVAMAA Petri

TORVALDS Nils

VIRKKUNEN Henna

MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT BY MEMBER STATE

(2 July 2019)

Sweden (20 Members)

AL-SAHLANI Abir

BERGKVIST Erik

BJÖRK Malin

DANIELSSON Johan

FEDERLEY Fredrick

FRITZON Heléne

GUTELAND Jytte

HOLMGREN Pär

INCIR Evin

KARLSBRO Karin

KOKALARI Arba

KUHNKE Alice

LEGA David

LUNDGREN Peter

POLFJÄRD Jessica

SKYTTEDAL Sara

STEGRUD Jessica

TOBÉ Tomas

WARBORN Jörgen

WEIMERS Charlie

MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT BY MEMBER STATE

(2 July 2019)

United Kingdom (73 Members)

AINSLIE Scott

ALLARD Christian

ANDERSON Martina

BEARDER Catherine

BENNION Phil

BROPHY Jane

BULL David

BULLOCK Jonathan

BUNTING Judith

CHOWNS Ellie

CORBETT Richard

DANCE Seb

DAUBNEY Martin Edward

DAVIES Chris

DE LUCY Belinda

DHAMIJA Dinesh

DODDS Diane

DOWDING Gina

ENGLAND KERR Andrew

EVANS Jill

FARAGE Nigel

FORMAN Lance

FOX Claire

GIBSON Barbara Ann

GILL Nathan

GILL Neena

GLANCY James Alexander

GRIFFIN Theresa

HABIB Ben

HANNAN Daniel

HARRIS Lucy Elizabeth

HEAVER Michael

HOOK Anthony

HORWOOD Martin

HOWARTH John

JONES Jackie

JORDAN Christina Sheila

KIRTON-DARLING Jude

LONG Naomi

LONGWORTH John

LOWE Rupert

MAGID Magid

McINTYRE Anthea

McLEOD Aileen

MOBARIK Nosheena

MOHAMMED Shaffaq

MONTEITH Brian

MORAES Claude

MUMMERY June Alison

NETHSINGHA Lucy

NEWTON DUNN Bill

OVERGAARD NIELSEN Henrik

PALMER Rory

PATTEN Matthew

PHILLIPS Alexandra Lesley

PHILLIPS Alexandra Louise Rosenfield

PORRITT Luisa

PUGH Jake

REES-MOGG Annunziata Mary

RITCHIE Sheila

ROWETT Catherine

ROWLAND Robert

SCOTT CATO Molly

SMITH Alyn (*)

STEDMAN-BRYCE Louis

TENNANT John David Edward

TICE Richard

VAN ORDEN Geoffrey

VOADEN Caroline

VON WIESE Irina

WARD Julie

WELLS James

WIDDECOMBE Ann

(*) Mr Alyn Smith’s mandate ended on 12 December 2019.

NOTIFICATIONS BY THE MEMBER STATES

BE

24.06.2019

28.06.2019

BG

06.06.2019

09.10.2019

CZ

18.06.2019

DK

25.06.2019

DE

26.06.2019

EE

14.06.2019

IE

06.06.2019

GR

12.06.2019

20.06.2019

ES

17.06.2019

20.06.2019

FR

13.06.2019

HR

10.06.2019

IT

21.06.2019

22.06.2019

11.10.2019

CY

28.05.2019

04.06.2019

LV

07.06.2019

14.10.2019

LT

03.06.2019

LU

20.06.2019

HU

17.06.2019

21.10.2019

MT

27.05.2019

NL

25.06.2019

AU

17.06.2019

PL

28.05.2019

PT

25.06.2019

05.11.2019

RO

21.06.2019

11.10.2019

SL

19.06.2019

16.10.2019

SK

30.05.2019

14.10.2019

FI

31.05.2019

SV

03.06.2019

UK

31.05.2019

07.10.2019

(1) OJ L 278, 8.10.1976, p. 1.
(2) OJ L 283, 21.10.2002, p. 1.
(3) OJ L 262, 7.10.2005, p. 1.
(4) OJ L 329, 30.12.1993, p. 34.
(5) OJ L 26, 26.1.2013, p. 27.
(6) OJ L 181, 29.6.2013, p. 57.
(7) OJ L 165, 2.7.2018, p. 1.
(8) Le Pen v Parliament, C-208/03, EU:C:2005:429; Italy and Donnici v Parliament, C-393/07 and C-9/08, EU:C:2009:275: and Junqueras Vies, C-502/19, EU:C:2019:1115.
(9) Boletín Oficial del Estado, No. 142, 14 June 2019, p. 62477-62478.
(10) Junqueras Vies, C-502/19, EU:C:2019:1115.


Appointment of a member of the Single Resolution Board
PDF 116kWORD 45k
European Parliament decision of 30 January 2020 on the proposal for the appointment of a member of the Single Resolution Board (N9-0005/2020[1] – C9-0009/2020 – 2020/0902(NLE))
P9_TA(2020)0020A9-0009/2020

(Approval)

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to the Commission proposal of 14 January 2020 for the appointment of Pedro Machado as Member of the Single Resolution Board (C9-0009/2020),

–  having regard to Article 56(6) of Regulation (EU) No 806/2014 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 15 July 2014 establishing uniform rules and a uniform procedure for the resolution of credit institutions and certain investment firms in the framework of a Single Resolution Mechanism and a Single Resolution Fund and amending Regulation (EU) No 1093/2010(1),

–  having regard to its resolution of 14 March 2019 on gender balance in EU economic and monetary affairs nominations(2),

–  having regard to its resolution of 16 January 2020 on institutions and bodies of the Economic and Monetary Union: preventing post-public employment conflicts of interest(3),

–  having regard to Rule 131 of its Rules of Procedure,

–  having regard to the report of the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs (A9-0009/2020),

A.  whereas Article 56(4) of Regulation (EU) No 806/2014 provides that the members of the Single Resolution Board referred to in point (b) of Article 43(1) of that Regulation are to be appointed on the basis of merit, skills, knowledge of banking and financial matters, and of experience relevant to financial supervision, regulation and bank resolution;

B.  whereas Parliament deplores the fact that all candidates were men despite the obligations under Article 56(4) of Regulation (EU) No 806/2014 and the numerous calls made by Parliament to respect gender balance when presenting lists of candidates; whereas Parliament regrets that women continue to be under-represented in executive positions in the field of banking and financial services and demands that gender balance be respected for the next nomination; whereas all EU and national institutions and bodies should implement concrete measures to ensure gender balance;

C.  whereas in accordance with Article 56(6) of Regulation (EU) No 806/2014, on 13 November 2019 the Commission adopted a shortlist for the position of Member of the Single Resolution Board as referred to in point (b) of Article 43(1) of that Regulation;

D.  whereas in accordance with Article 56(6) of Regulation (EU) No 806/2014, the Commission provided the shortlist to Parliament;

E.  whereas on 14 January 2020 the Commission adopted a proposal to appoint Pedro Machado as Member of the Single Resolution Board and Director of Resolution Planning and Decisions in the Single Resolution Board, and transmitted that proposal to Parliament;

F.  whereas the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs then proceeded to evaluate the credentials of the proposed candidate for the functions of Member of the Single Resolution Board, in particular in view of the requirements laid down in Article 56(4) of Regulation (EU) No 806/2014;

G.  whereas on 22 January 2020 the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs held a hearing with Pedro Machado, at which he made an opening statement and then responded to questions from the members of the committee;

1.  Approves the appointment of Pedro Machado as Member of the Single Resolution Board for a period of five years;

2.  Instructs its President to forward this decision to the European Council, the Council, the Commission and the governments of the Member States.

(1) OJ L 225, 30.7.2014, p. 1.
(2) Texts adopted, P8_TA(2019)0211.
(3) Texts adopted, P9_TA(2020)0017.


Appointment of a member of the Single Resolution Board
PDF 116kWORD 45k
European Parliament decision of 30 January 2020 on the proposal for the appointment of a member of the Single Resolution Board (N9-0005/2020[2] – C9-0010/2020 – 2020/0903(NLE))
P9_TA(2020)0021A9-0011/2020

(Approval)

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to the Commission proposal of 14 January 2020 for the appointment of Jesús Saurina as Member of the Single Resolution Board (C9-0010/2020),

–  having regard to Article 56(6) of Regulation (EU) No 806/2014 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 15 July 2014 establishing uniform rules and a uniform procedure for the resolution of credit institutions and certain investment firms in the framework of a Single Resolution Mechanism and a Single Resolution Fund and amending Regulation (EU) No 1093/2010(1),

–  having regard to its resolution of 14 March 2019 on gender balance in EU economic and monetary affairs nominations(2),

–  having regard to its resolution of 16 January 2020 on institutions and bodies of the Economic and Monetary Union: preventing post-public employment conflicts of interest(3),

–  having regard to Rule 131 of its Rules of Procedure,

–  having regard to the report of the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs (A9-0011/2020),

A.  whereas Article 56(4) of Regulation (EU) No 806/2014 provides that the members of the Single Resolution Board referred to in point (b) of Article 43(1) of that Regulation are to be appointed on the basis of merit, skills, knowledge of banking and financial matters, and of experience relevant to financial supervision, regulation and bank resolution;

B.  whereas Parliament deplores that all candidates were men despite the obligations under Article 56(4) of Regulation (EU) No 806/2014 and the numerous calls made by Parliament to respect gender balance when presenting lists of candidates; whereas Parliament regrets that women continue to be underrepresented in executive positions in the field of banking and financial services and demands that gender balance be respected for the next nomination; whereas all EU and national institutions and bodies should implement concrete measures to ensure gender balance;

C.  whereas in accordance with Article 56(6) of Regulation (EU) No 806/2014, on 13 November 2019 the Commission adopted a shortlist for the position of Member of the Single Resolution Board as referred to in point (b) of Article 43(1) of that Regulation;

D.  whereas in accordance with Article 56(6) of Regulation (EU) No 806/2014, the Commission provided the shortlist to Parliament;

E.  whereas on 14 January 2020 the Commission adopted a proposal to appoint Jesús Saurina as Member of the Single Resolution Board and Director of Resolution Planning and Decisions in the Single Resolution Board, and transmitted that proposal to Parliament;

F.  whereas the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs then proceeded to evaluate the credentials of the proposed candidate for the functions of Member of the Single Resolution Board, in particular in view of the requirements laid down in Article 56(4) of Regulation (EU) No 806/2014;

G.  whereas on 22 January 2020 the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs held a hearing with Jesús Saurina, at which he made an opening statement and then responded to questions from the members of the committee;

1.  Approves the appointment of Jesús Saurina as Member of the Single Resolution Board for a period of five years;

2.  Instructs its President to forward this decision to the European Council, the Council, the Commission and the governments of the Member States.

(1) OJ L 225, 30.7.2014, p. 1.
(2) Texts adopted, P8_TA(2019)0211.
(3) Texts adopted, P9_TA(2020)0017.


Appointment of the Vice-Chair of the Single Resolution Board
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European Parliament decision of 30 January 2020 on the proposal for the appointment of the Vice-Chair of the Single Resolution Board (N9-0006/2020 – C9-0011/2020 – 2020/0904(NLE))
P9_TA(2020)0022A9-0010/2020

(Approval)

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to the Commission proposal of 14 January 2020 for the appointment of Jan de Carpentier as Vice-Chair of the Single Resolution Board (C9-0011/2020),

–  having regard to Article 56(6) of Regulation (EU) No 806/2014 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 15 July 2014 establishing uniform rules and a uniform procedure for the resolution of credit institutions and certain investment firms in the framework of a Single Resolution Mechanism and a Single Resolution Fund and amending Regulation (EU) No 1093/2010(1),

–  having regard to its resolution of 14 March 2019 on gender balance in EU economic and monetary affairs nominations(2),

–  having regard to its resolution of 16 January 2020 on institutions and bodies of the Economic and Monetary Union: preventing post-public employment conflicts of interest(3),

–  having regard to Rule 131 of its Rules of Procedure,

–  having regard to the report of the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs (A9-0010/2020),

A.  whereas Article 56(4) of Regulation (EU) No 806/2014 provides that the Vice-Chair of the Single Resolution Board is to be appointed on the basis of merit, skills, knowledge of banking and financial matters, and of experience relevant to financial supervision, regulation and bank resolution;

B.  whereas Parliament deplores the fact that all candidates were men despite the obligations under Article 56(4) of Regulation (EU) No 806/2014 and the numerous calls made by Parliament to respect gender balance when presenting lists of candidates; whereas Parliament regrets that women continue to be under-represented in executive positions in the field of banking and financial services and demands that gender balance be respected for the next nomination; whereas all EU and national institutions and bodies should implement concrete measures to ensure gender balance;

C.  whereas in accordance with Article 56(6) of Regulation (EU) No 806/2014, on 13 November 2019 the Commission adopted a shortlist for the position of Vice-Chair of the Single Resolution Board;

D.  whereas in accordance with Article 56(6) of Regulation (EU) No 806/2014, the Commission provided the shortlist to Parliament;

E.  whereas on 14 January 2020 the Commission adopted a proposal to appoint Jan de Carpentier as Vice-Chair of the Single Resolution Board and Director operating the SRB corporate services and overseeing the Single Resolution Fund, and transmitted that proposal to Parliament;

F.  whereas the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs then proceeded to evaluate the credentials of the proposed candidate for the functions of Vice-Chair of the Single Resolution Board, in particular in view of the requirements laid down in Article 56(4) of Regulation (EU) No 806/2014;

G.  whereas on 22 January 2020 the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs held a hearing with Jan de Carpentier, at which he made an opening statement and then responded to questions from the members of the committee;

1.  Approves the appointment of Jan de Carpentier as Vice-Chair of the Single Resolution Board for a period of five years;

2.  Instructs its President to forward this decision to the European Council, the Council, the Commission and the governments of the Member States.

(1) OJ L 225, 30.7.2014, p. 1.
(2) Texts adopted, P8_TA(2019)0211.
(3) Texts adopted, P9_TA(2020)0017.


Appointment of the Executive Director of the European Banking Authority
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European Parliament decision of 30 January 2020 on the proposal for the appointment of the Executive Director of the European Banking Authority (N9-0003/2020 – C9-0006/2020 – 2020/0901(NLE))
P9_TA(2020)0023A9-0008/2020

(Approval)

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to the proposal of the Board of Supervisors of the European Banking Authority of 14 January 2020 (C9‑0006/2020),

–  having regard to Article 51(2) of Regulation (EU) No 1093/2010 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 24 November 2010 establishing a European Supervisory Authority (European Banking Authority), amending Decision No 716/2009/EC and repealing Commission Decision 2009/78/EC(1),

–  having regard to its resolution of 14 March 2019 on gender balance in EU economic and monetary affairs nominations(2),

–  having regard to its resolution of 16 January 2020 on institutions and bodies of the Economic and Monetary Union: preventing post-public employment conflicts of interest(3),

–  having regard to Rule 131 of its Rules of Procedure,

–  having regard to the report of the Committee of Economic and Monetary Affairs (A9-0008/2020),

A.  whereas the current Executive Director of the European Banking Authority has announced his resignation from the post with effect from 31 January 2020;

B.  whereas, on 14 January 2020, the Board of Supervisors of the European Banking Authority, following an open selection procedure, proposed to appoint Gerry Cross as Executive Director for a term of office of five years, in accordance with Article 51(2) and (3) of Regulation (EU) No 1093/2010;

C.  whereas, on 22 January 2020, the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs held a hearing with Gerry Cross, at which he made an opening statement and then responded to questions from the members of the Committee;

1.  Declines to approve the appointment of Gerry Cross as Executive Director of the European Banking Authority, and asks for the proposal to be withdrawn and for a new one to be submitted to Parliament;

2.  Instructs its President to forward this decision to the Council, the Commission, the European Banking Authority and the governments of the Member States.

(1) OJ L 331, 15.12.2010, p. 12.
(2) Texts adopted, P8_TA(2019)0211.
(3) Texts adopted, P9_TA(2020)0017.


Common charger for mobile radio equipment
PDF 122kWORD 48k
European Parliament resolution of 30 January 2020 on a common charger for mobile radio equipment (2019/2983(RSP))
P9_TA(2020)0024RC-B9-0070/2020

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to Directive 2014/53/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 16 April 2014 on the harmonisation of the laws of the Member States relating to the making available on the market of radio equipment and repealing Directive 1999/5/EC(1),

–  having regard to the Memorandum of Understanding regarding harmonisation of a charging capability for mobile phones of 5 June 2009,

–  having regard to the Memorandum of Understanding on the future common charging solution for smartphones of 20 March 2018,

–  having regard to the Commission report of 11 November 2018 on the operation of the Radio Equipment Directive 2014/53/EU (COM(2018)0740),

–  having regard to Rule 132(2) and (4) of its Rules of Procedure,

A.  whereas the single market has been, and remains, the basis for Europe’s economic success, the cornerstone of European integration and an engine of growth and jobs;

B.  whereas the single market is not exploiting its full potential, and continuing fragmentation of the market for chargers for mobile phones and other small and medium-sized electronic devices translates into an increase in e-waste and consumer frustration;

C.  whereas consumers are still having to acquire different chargers when buying new devices from different sellers, and are obliged to buy a new charger when purchasing a new device from the same seller;

D.  whereas for more than 10 years Members of the European Parliament have been demanding a common charger for mobile radio equipment, including mobile phones, tablets, e-book readers, smart cameras, wearable electronics and other small or medium-sized electronic devices; whereas the Commission has repeatedly postponed the delegated act supplementing Directive 2014/53/EU on radio equipment;

E.  whereas the timely implementation of adopted EU legislation through concrete legislative steps is essential to the European Union’s credibility in the eyes of its citizens and on the international stage;

F.  whereas voluntary agreements between industry players, although significantly decreasing the number of charger types available on the market, have proved unsuccessful in terms of achieving a common charging solution, and consumers are still confronted with different types of chargers across the market;

G.  whereas around 50 million metric tons of e-waste is generated globally per year, with an average of more than 6 kg per person; whereas total e-waste generation in Europe in 2016 was 12,3 million metric tonnes, equivalent to 16,6 kg on average per inhabitant(2); whereas this represents an unnecessary environmental footprint that can be reduced;

H.  whereas within the framework of the European Green Deal, Parliament called for an ambitious new circular economy action plan aiming to reduce the total environmental and resource footprint of EU production and consumption, with resource efficiency, zero pollution and waste prevention as key priorities;

I.  whereas consumer trends in the past 10 years show growing multi-device ownership and short lifecycles for some radio equipment, e.g. smartphones; whereas older equipment is often replaced because it is seen as outdated; whereas, furthermore, these trends lead to the production of additional e-waste, including chargers;

J.  whereas consumers own, use and often carry with them many different chargers for similar battery-operated devices; whereas the present oversupply of chargers therefore causes excessive costs and inconvenience to consumers and an unnecessary environmental footprint;

K.  whereas people now rely on their mobile devices in numerous daily situations, especially in the event of an emergency or when travelling, which is also due to the lack of public telephones; whereas people rely on an easily chargeable mobile phone to quickly access essential services and vital tools such as means of payment, search engines, navigation devices, etc.; whereas mobile devices are an essential tool for full participation in society;

1.  Strongly stresses that there is an urgent need for EU regulatory action to reduce electronic waste, empower consumers to make sustainable choices, and allow them to fully participate in an efficient and well-functioning internal market;

2.  Calls on the Commission to present and publish without further delay the results of the impact assessment on the introduction of a common charger for mobile telephones and other compatible devices with a view to proposing mandatory provisions;

3.  Emphasises the need for a standard for a common charger for mobile radio equipment to be adopted as a matter of urgency in order to avoid further internal market fragmentation;

4.  Calls, therefore, on the Commission to take action to introduce the common charger without any further delay by adopting the delegated act supplementing Directive 2014/53/EU on radio equipment defining a standard for a common charger for mobile phones and other small and medium-sized radio equipment by July 2020, or, if necessary, by adopting a legislative measure by July 2020 at the latest;

5.  Points out that the Commission, without hampering innovation, should ensure that the legislative framework for a common charger will be scrutinised regularly in order to take into account technical progress; reiterates the importance of research and innovation in this domain to improve existing technologies and come up with new ones;

6.  Points out that the use of wireless charging technology entails additional potential benefits such as mitigating e-waste; highlights that many mobile telephones already use wireless charging methods and that fragmentation in this area should be avoided; calls, therefore, on the Commission to take measures to best ensure the interoperability of different wireless chargers with different mobile radio equipment;

7.  Recalls that in line with the Standardisation Regulation(3), European standardisation organisations must facilitate the participation of relevant stakeholders, which include, in this context, SME organisations, environmental organisations, people with disabilities, the elderly and consumers;

8.  Believes that the Commission should consider legislative initiatives to increase the volume of cables and chargers collected and recycled in the Member States;

9.  Urges the Commission to ensure that consumers are no longer obliged to buy new chargers with each new device, thereby reducing the volume of chargers produced per year; considers that decoupling strategies would allow for greater environmental benefits; stresses meanwhile that any measure aiming at decoupling should avoid potentially higher prices for consumers; underlines, furthermore, that decoupling strategies should be introduced with a common charger solution, as otherwise the aims of the directive would not be achieved;

10.  Instructs its President to forward this resolution to the Council, the Commission and the governments and parliaments of the Member States.

(1) OJ L 153, 22.5.2014, p. 62.
(2) The Global E-waste Monitor 2017
(3) Regulation (EU) No 1025/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 25 October 2012 on European standardisation, amending Council Directives 89/686/EEC and 93/15/EEC and Directives 94/9/EC, 94/25/EC, 95/16/EC, 97/23/EC, 98/34/EC, 2004/22/EC, 2007/23/EC, 2009/23/EC and 2009/105/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council and repealing Council Decision 87/95/EEC and Decision No 1673/2006/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council (OJ L 316, 14.11.2012, p. 12).


Gender pay gap
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European Parliament resolution of 30 January 2020 on the gender pay gap (2019/2870(RSP))
P9_TA(2020)0025B9-0073/2020

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to Articles 2 and 3(3) of the Treaty on European Union (TEU),

–  having regard to Articles 8, 151, 153 and 157 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU),

–  having regard to the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union, in particular its provisions on gender equality,

–  having regard to Articles 22 and 25 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights,

–  having regard to the European Pillar of Social Rights, in particular principles 2, 3, 6, 9 and 15 thereof,

–  having regard to the UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) thereof, in particular goals 1, 5, 8 and 10 and their respective targets and indicators,

–  having regard to the International Labour Organisation (ILO) Equal Remuneration Convention of 1951, and to the ILO Violence and Harassment Convention of 2019,

–  having regard to the Commission Recommendation of 7 March 2014 on strengthening the principle of equal pay between men and women through transparency(1),

–  having regard to the Commission’s Strategy for equality between women and men 2010-2015 (COM(2010)0491),

–  having regard to the Commission’s Strategic Engagement for Gender Equality 2016-2019,

–  having regard to the Commission’s EU Action Plan on tackling the gender pay gap for 2017-2019 (COM(2017)0678),

–  having regard to the Commission’s 2019 report on equality between women and men in the EU,

–  having regard to Directive 2006/54/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 5 July 2006 on the implementation of the principle of equal opportunities and equal treatment of men and women in matters of employment and occupation(2) and Directive (EU) 2019/1158 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 20 June 2019 on work-life balance for parents and carers and repealing Council Directive 2010/18/EU(3),

–  having regard to the European Institute for Gender Equality’s Gender Equality Index, in particular the Index’s 2019 report,

–  having regard to the Council conclusions of 7 March 2011 on the European Pact for Gender Equality 2011-2020(4),

–  having regard to the Council conclusions of 18 June 2015 on Equal income opportunities for women and men: Closing the gender gap in pensions,

–  having regard to the Council conclusions of 13 June 2019 on Closing the Gender Pay Gap: Key Policies and Measures,

–  having regard to the Council conclusions of 10 December 2019 on Gender-Equal Economies in the EU: The Way Forward,

–  having regard to its resolution of 24 May 2012 with recommendations to the Commission on application of the principle of equal pay for male and female workers for equal work or work of equal value(5),

–  having regard to its resolution of 26 May 2016 on poverty: a gender perspective(6),

–  having regard to its resolution of 19 January 2017 on a European Pillar of Social Rights(7),

–  having regard to its resolution of 14 June 2017 on the need for an EU strategy to end and prevent the gender pension gap(8),

–  having regard to its resolution of 3 October 2017 on women’s economic empowerment in the private and public sectors in the EU(9),

–  having regard to its resolution of 16 November 2017 on combating inequalities as a lever to boost job creation and growth(10),

–  having regard to Rule 132(2) of its Rules of Procedure,

A.  whereas gender equality is one of the common and fundamental principles of the European Union, enshrined in Articles 2 and 3(3) of the TEU, Article 8 of the TFEU and Article 23 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights; whereas Article 157 of the TFEU expressly states that the Member States must ensure that the principle of equal pay for male and female workers for equal work or work of equal value is applied; whereas economic independence is an essential prerequisite for the self-fulfilment of women and men, and whereas guaranteeing equal access to financial resources is critical to the process of achieving gender equality;

B.  whereas principle no 2 of the European Pillar of Social Rights states that ‘equality of treatment and opportunities between women and men must be ensured and fostered in all areas, including regarding participation in the labour market, terms and conditions of employment and career progression’ and that ‘women and men have the right to equal pay for work of equal value’;

C.  whereas the Commission’s 2014 Recommendation outlined a set of core measures to help Member States to enhance transparency and strengthen the principle of equal pay between men and women; whereas these measures encompassed the right of employees to obtain information on pay levels, reporting on pay, pay audits, collective bargaining, statistics and administrative data, data protection, a clarification of the concept of work of equal value, job evaluation and classification systems, support for equality bodies, consistent monitoring and enforcement of remedies, and awareness-raising activities;

D.  whereas across the EU, women’s earnings are disproportionately lower than men’s; whereas according to the latest figures from the Commission, the EU gender gap in hourly pay is 16 %, although this varies significantly across Member States; whereas the gender pay gap rises to 40 % when employment rates and overall labour market participation are considered; whereas while only 8,7 % of men in the EU work part-time, almost a third of women across the EU (31,3 %) do so; whereas there is a specific negative correlation between the feminisation of an occupation and the level of wages, as attested to by the decline in average wages in companies where 65 % or more of the employees are women;

E.  whereas the gender pay gap is defined as the difference between the average gross hourly earnings of men and women, expressed as a percentage of the average gross hourly earnings of men; whereas around two thirds of the gender pay gap cannot be explained by gender differences in labour market attributes such as age, experience and education, occupational category or working time and other observable attributes, revealing a clear discriminatory factor, with gender discrimination also intersecting with multiple forms of discrimination; whereas an intersectional approach is crucial to understanding the multiple forms of discrimination which compound the gender pay gap for women with a combination of identities and the intersection of gender with other social factors;

F.  whereas women’s economic empowerment is key to eliminating the gender pay gap; whereas taking action in this field is not only a question of fairness, but is also an economic imperative, as the economic loss resulting from the gender employment gap amounts to around EUR 370 billion per year(11); whereas the failure to pay women equally limits their ability to attain economic independence and therefore their ability to live in full autonomy; whereas according to the Institute for Women’s Policy Research, the poverty rate among working women could decrease from 8,0 % to 3,8 % if women were paid the same as men; whereas 2,5 million of the 5,6 million children living in poverty today would be lifted out of poverty if the gender pay gap were closed;

G.  whereas the gender gap in gross monthly earnings among employees aged 15-24 years (7 %) was more than five times lower than among employees aged 65 years or above (gender gap of 38 %); whereas a ‘motherhood pay gap’ also exists, with a pay gap between women with and without dependent children, as well as between mothers and fathers; whereas poverty is mostly concentrated in families where women are the sole earners, with 35 % of single mothers in the EU at risk of poverty, compared to 28 % of single fathers in 2017(12);

H.  whereas care is a fundamental pillar of our society and is to a large extent carried out by women; whereas this imbalance is reflected in the gender pay and pension gap; whereas motherhood and caring for children and for elderly, sick or disabled family members and other dependents represent additional or sometimes full-time work that is almost exclusively carried out by women; whereas this is reflected in labour market segregation and in the higher proportion of women working part-time, for lower hourly wages, with career breaks and with fewer years in employment; whereas this work is often unpaid and inadequately valued by society, even though it is of enormous social importance and contributes to social welfare;

I.  whereas more than half of women of working age with disabilities are economically inactive; whereas in all Member States the severe material deprivation rate of women with disabilities is higher than that of women without disabilities;

J.  whereas it is necessary to defend women’s rights, in law and in life, and to take measures to combat all forms of exploitation, violence, oppression and inequality between women and men;

K.  whereas the ramifications of the gender pay gap include a 37 % gender gap in pension income, a situation that will persist for decades to come, and an unequal level of economic independence between women and men, with 1 in 5 women workers in the EU belonging to the lowest wage group, compared to 1 in 10 men; whereas reducing the pension gap is also a matter of intergenerational solidarity;

L.  whereas this pension gap stems from accumulated inequalities throughout the course of women’s working lives and from the periods of absence on the labour market that are imposed on women as a result of multiple forms of inequality and discrimination, as well as lower pay and wage discrimination; whereas in order to overcome pension inequalities and safeguard and increase pensions in general, it is imperative that social security systems continue to exist within the public sphere and integrate the principles of solidarity and redistribution, and that the most strenuous efforts are made to fight precarious and deregulated work;

M.  whereas the gender pay gap and its causes have exponentially damaging consequences for women throughout their lives, culminating in a gender pension gap that is currently more than double that of the pay gap; whereas the risk of poverty rises sharply along the life course, revealing the gradually accumulating impact of pay inequalities; whereas poverty among those aged 75 years and over is consistently concentrated among women, mainly as a result of the impact of gendered unpaid care duties, life-long differences in pay and working time with the lower pensions that result, different retirement ages for men and women in some Member States, and the fact that more older women live alone;

N.  whereas Directive 2006/54/EC has contributed to the improvement of women’s situation in the labour market, but has not brought about any profound changes in the legislation on closing the gender pay gap in many Member States;

O.  whereas pay transparency can play a crucial role in ensuring substantial progress is made in addressing the gender pay gap, as it helps to reveal the undervaluation of women’s work and to highlight gendered labour market segmentation, including through tools providing objective criteria that allow for gender-neutral assessment and comparability of the value of work in different jobs and sectors;

P.  whereas job evaluation methods free from gender bias are essential to enabling jobs to be compared on the basis of their scale and complexity in order to determine the position of one job in relation to another within a given sector or organisation, regardless of whether the jobs in question are held by women or men;

Q.  whereas the risk of poverty and lesser degree of financial autonomy induced by both the gender pay and pension gaps further exposes women to gender-based violence, in particular domestic violence, making it more difficult for them to leave an abusive relationship; whereas according to the UN, psychological or sexual harassment at the workplace or harassment with serious consequences in terms of personal and professional aspirations is experienced by almost 35 % of women worldwide and are harmful to women’s self-esteem and their negotiating position for fairer remuneration;

R.  whereas the causes of the gender pay gap are numerous, and include both structural and cultural factors, on the one hand gender-segregated labour markets and sectors, a lack of work-life balance options and services, with women being the main caregiver for both children and other dependents, the persistence of ‘glass ceilings’ not allowing women to reach the top levels of their career and thus top-level salaries, and on the other hand, gender stereotypes about women’s roles and aspirations, gender bias in wage structures and wage-fixing institutions, and deep-rooted expectations about women’s role as mothers leading to career breaks, interruptions, or a move to part-time work, as well as a lack of pay transparency;

S.  whereas the causes of the gender pay and related gender earnings and pension gaps are numerous, structural and often interlinked; whereas these causes can be divided into two components, firstly, one which can be ostensibly ‘explained’ by differences in the labour market attributes of women and men and secondly, one which ostensibly remains ‘unexplained’ by such characteristics, with the latter being the dominant component of the gender pay gap in almost all countries globally;

T.  whereas these differences in the labour market attributes of women and men include age, experience and education, occupational sector or working time; whereas they are reflected in the fact that women more often work part-time, are confronted with the corporate glass ceiling, work in female-dominated and lower paid sectors and positions or often have to take the primary responsibility for the care of their families as a result of gendered social norms, leading to time away from employment; whereas the larger ‘unexplained’ component can be attributed to gender stereotypes, pay discrimination and the frequent undervaluation of female-dominated work, which can be both direct or indirect, and remains a hidden phenomenon which must be tackled more effectively;

U.  whereas although women account for almost 60 % of graduates in the EU, they remain disproportionally under-represented in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) and digital careers; whereas, as a result, inequality in occupations is taking on new forms and, in spite of the investment in education, young women are still twice as likely as young men to be economically inactive;

1.  Recalls that equal pay for equal work or work of equal value is one of the EU’s founding principles, and that the Member States have an obligation to eliminate discrimination on grounds of gender with regard to all aspects and conditions of remuneration for the same work or for work of equal value; strongly regrets the fact that the gender pay gap for work of equal value continues to persist with minimal improvement in the EU average figure over the last decade;

2.  Calls on the Commission to come forward with an ambitious new EU Strategy for Gender Equality, building on the previous strategy and strategic engagement, and which should include binding measures on the gender pay gap and pay transparency, as well as clear targets and monitoring processes to promote gender equality and measure progress towards achieving it, particularly as regards the related gender earnings and pension gaps and the promotion of women and men as equal earners and carers;

3.  Recalls that the gender pay gap and its causes have exponentially damaging consequences for women throughout their lives, culminating in a gender pension gap that is more than double the pay gap; recalls that women are more at risk of poverty in old age than men on account of lifelong differences in pay and working time, different pension ages for men and women in some Member States, and the fact that more older women live alone; calls on the Member States to implement specific measures to combat the risk of poverty for older women, by increasing pensions but also by offering social support; affirms that in addition to the promotion of labour regulation based on greater labour rights, regulated work and the prohibition of precarious work, collective bargaining should be restored, defended and promoted as a decisive tool for overcoming inequalities, notably in terms of salaries, but also in terms of defending and consolidating labour rights;

4.  Calls for the immediate revision and an ambitious update of the Gender Pay Gap Action Plan by the end of 2020, which should set clear targets for the Member States to reduce the gender pay gap over the next five years and ensure that such targets are taken account of in the country specific recommendations; highlights, in particular, the need to include an intersectional perspective in the new Action Plan; calls on the Commission to pay particular attention to the factors leading to the pension gap under the Action Plan, and to assess the need for specific measures to reduce this gap at EU and national level;

5.  Calls on the Member States to strengthen their efforts to eliminate the gender pay gap by rigorously enforcing the principle of equal pay for equal work or work of equal value, not only through legislation and measures to combat salary discrimination but also by restoring, promoting and defending collective bargaining; calls, furthermore, for measures that tackle vertical and horizontal segregation in employment and discriminatory practices in decisions concerning recruitment and promotion; calls for measures that increase social protection in the fields of maternity, unemployment, sickness, workplace accidents and occupational diseases;

6.  Welcomes the commitment of both the Commission President and the Commissioner for Equality to table measures to introduce binding pay transparency measures in the first 100 days of the Commission’s mandate; considers that the forthcoming directive should include strong enforcement policies for those failing to comply, and should apply to both the private and public sector, with due account taken of the specificities of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), and to the entire remuneration package, including any components thereof, and have a broad scope ; calls on the Commission to consider introducing concrete measures, building on its 2014 Recommendation, such as (a) the clear definition of criteria for assessing the value of work, (b) gender-neutral job evaluation and classification systems, (c) gender pay audits and reports to guarantee equal pay, (d) workers’ entitlement to request full pay information and right to redress, and (e) clear targets for companies’ equality performance; strongly believes that such measures are necessary to identify cases of pay discrimination in order for workers to make informed decisions and take action where necessary; calls on the Commission to promote the role of the social partners and of collective bargaining at all levels (national, sectoral, local and company) in the upcoming pay transparency legislation;

7.  Calls on the Commission to complement the pay transparency initiative by developing, in close cooperation with social partners, and introducing guidelines for gender-neutral job evaluation and classification systems and the definition of clear criteria (such as qualifications, level of responsibility, physical and psychological burdens, shift patterns, etc.) for assessing the value of work, making it possible to compare the value of work in different jobs and sectors with the aim of obtaining fairer remuneration for work in female-dominated sectors, which is generally held in lower esteem and is thus not as well remunerated as work in male-dominated sectors;

8.  Calls on the Commission to take the current review of the functioning and implementation of the EU’s equal pay laws and the equal pay principle as the basis for its action, and to present a timely revision of Directive 2006/54/EC in order to update and improve existing legislation on the equal pay principle in practice, to improve enforcement in line with the case law of the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) and to include the prohibition of any discrimination based on sexual orientation, gender identity or gender reassignment; calls for improved access to justice and the introduction of stronger procedural rights to combat pay discrimination;

9.  Recalls that the Commission’s 2017 Report on the implementation of the Commission Recommendation on strengthening the principle of equal pay between men and women through transparency (COM(2017)0671) found that the measures were not effective and that their implementation was inadequate; welcomes, therefore, the commitment by the Commission President in her Political Guidelines for the next European Commission 2019-2024 that the principle of equal pay for equal work will be the founding principle of a new European Gender Strategy, and further welcomes the acknowledgement that gender equality is a critical component of economic growth, as well as an issue of fundamental rights and fairness;

10.  Reiterates its call for making the European Pillar of Social Rights, which promotes upward convergence, a reality at both EU and Member State level in order to ensure equal treatment and equal opportunities for women and men, as well as to uphold the right to equal pay for equal work or work of equal value for women and men; highlights that closing the gender gap should be a specific objective in the successor programme to the Europe 2020 Strategy;

11.  Calls on the Member States to strengthen their efforts to definitively close the gender pay gap by strictly enforcing the equal pay principle, ensuring that wages for part-time workers are in line with the full-time equivalent, adopting legislation increasing pay transparency and improving legal clarity to detect gender bias and discrimination in pay structures, fighting occupational segregation, whether it be vertical or horizontal in nature, and combating employer prejudice in recruitment and promotion decisions;

12.  Stresses that access to work and the conditions that facilitate it are central to ensuring women’s emancipation and independence in every sphere of life, from labour to social, economic and political participation, amongst others; considers that advancing towards achieving equality between women and men and the promotion of women’s rights represent a path of social progress for society as a whole while allowing the improvement of women’s socio-economic situation;

13.  Further calls on the Member States to adequately invest in the provision, accessibility, affordability and quality of formal early childhood education and care services, using European Structural and Investment Funds in line with the Barcelona Targets, as well as to invest in long-term care services and family-friendly working arrangements to ensure women’s equal and continued participation in the labour market by providing adequate flexibility to help promote higher employment rates among women; reiterates that in order to combat the risk of poverty among older women, as well as to tackle the causes of the gender pay gap, Member States should ensure that adequate provision is made for older women, including measures such as credits for care periods, adequate minimum pensions, survivor’s benefits and family leave entitlements for men in order to prevent the feminisation of poverty; calls on the Council to introduce targets for care for older people and people with dependents similar to the Barcelona Targets for childcare;

14.  Calls on the Commission and the Member States to implement policies that promote the employment of women and their financial independence, including policies that promote the integration of women from marginalised groups into the labour market; calls on the Member States to combat gendered labour market segmentation by investing in formal, informal and non-formal education and lifelong learning and vocational training for women to ensure they have access to high-quality employment and opportunities so as to reskill and upskill for future labour market changes; calls, in particular, for greater promotion of entrepreneurship, STEM subjects, digital education and financial literacy for girls from an early age in order to combat existing educational stereotypes and ensure more women enter developing and well-paid sectors;

15.  Calls on Member States to ensure the swift adoption and implementation of the Work-Life Balance Directive, and for the Commission to closely monitor their progress with a view to the eventual report and accompanying studies on its implementation;

16.  Notes the impact that women’s underrepresentation in leadership positions has on the gender pay gap, and highlights the urgent need to promote equality between men and women at all levels of decision-making in business and management; calls on the Member States to unblock the negotiations in the Council on the proposed Women on Boards directive as it could help eliminate the glass ceiling;

17.  Calls on both the Commission and the Member States to collect disaggregated data in order to better gauge and monitor progress in closing the gender pay gap, while paying particular attention to groups that experience multiple and intersectional forms of discrimination such as women with disabilities, migrant and ethnic minority women, Roma women, older women, women in rural and depopulated areas, single mothers and LGBTIQ people;

18.  Stresses that the collection of gender-disaggregated data needs to be further improved in areas such as informal employment, entrepreneurship, access to financing and to healthcare services, violence against women and unpaid work; emphasises the need to collect and make use of quality data and evidence for informed and evidence-based policymaking; calls on both the Commission and the Member States to collect disaggregated data in order to better evaluate and monitor progress in closing the gender pay gap, while paying particular attention to groups that experience multiple and intersectional forms of discrimination such as women with disabilities, migrant and ethnic minority women, Roma women, older women, single mothers and LGBTIQ people;

19.  Calls on the Commission to involve the social partners in developing new policies to close the gender pay gap; calls, in this context, on the social partners to engage in discussions and work together to address the pay gap, including through positive action measures, as well as to collaborate with civil society organisations in order to strongly engage public opinion, since closing the gender pay gap is a universal priority;

20.  Call on the Commission and Member states to step up their work to combat precarious female-dominated work and the feminisation of poverty; highlights the high levels of undeclared work performed by women, which have a negative impact on their income, social security coverage and protection, and calls on the Member States to ratify the ILO Domestic Workers Convention of 2011;

21.  Calls for the Member States to strengthen the protection of maternity, paternity and parenthood in labour legislation, namely by increasing the amount of leave and guaranteeing that it is fully paid and reducing the number of working hours during breastfeeding, and by taking suitable measures to enforce such protection, but also by investing in the provision of a free public network of early childhood education and care services and long-term care services; notes that a lack of availability, prohibitive costs and a lack of sufficient infrastructure for quality childcare services remain a significant barrier to – primarily – women’s equal participation in all aspects of society, including employment;

22.  Acknowledges that gender-based violence and harassment can also be exacerbated by the gender pay gap, as victims are often forced into lower-paying jobs as a result of hostile work environments; calls on the Member States to sign and ratify the ILO Violence and Harassment Convention of 2019 to introduce effective measures to define, prevent and prohibit violence and harassment at work, including safe and effective complaint and dispute resolution mechanisms, support, services and remedies;

23.  Calls on the Commission to lead by example and present a full analysis of the gender pay gap in the EU institutions on EU Equal Pay Day;

24.  Instructs its President to forward this resolution to the Council, the Commission and the governments of the Member States.

(1) OJ L 69, 8.3.2014, p. 112.
(2) OJ L 204, 26.7.2006, p. 23.
(3) OJ L 188, 12.7.2019, p. 79.
(4) OJ C 155, 25.5.2011, p. 10.
(5) OJ C 264 E, 13.9.2013, p. 75.
(6) OJ C 76, 28.2.2018, p. 93.
(7) OJ C 242, 10.7.2018, p. 24.
(8) OJ C 331, 18.9.2018, p. 60.
(9) OJ C 346, 27.9.2018, p. 6.
(10) OJ C 356, 4.10.2018, p. 89.
(11) Mascherini, M., Bisello, M. and Rioboo Leston, I.: The gender employment gap: Challenges and solutions, Eurofound, 2016.
(12) According to the European Institute for Gender Equality’s fact sheet entitled ‘Poverty, gender and lone parents in the EU’, quoting the figures from European Union Statistics on Income and Living Conditions (EU-SILC) from 2014.

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