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Procedure : 2023/2082(INI)
Document stages in plenary
Document selected : A9-0030/2024

Texts tabled :

A9-0030/2024

Debates :

PV 07/02/2024 - 16
PV 07/02/2024 - 18
CRE 07/02/2024 - 16
CRE 07/02/2024 - 18

Votes :

PV 08/02/2024 - 8.7

Texts adopted :

P9_TA(2024)0076

Texts adopted
PDF 157kWORD 55k
Thursday, 8 February 2024 - Strasbourg
Implementation report on the EU LGBTIQ Equality Strategy 2020-2025
P9_TA(2024)0076A9-0030/2024

European Parliament resolution of 8 February 2024 on the implementation of the EU LGBTIQ Equality Strategy 2020-2025 (2023/2082(INI))

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union,

–  having regard to Article 2 of the Treaty on European Union (TEU),

–  having regard to the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) and the related case law of the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR),

–  having regard to the case law of the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU),

–  having regard to the judgment of the CJEU of 5 June 2018 in case C-673/16,

–  having regard to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights,

–  having regard to the Council of Europe Convention on preventing and combating violence against women and domestic violence (‘the Istanbul Convention’), which was ratified by the European Union on 28 June 2023,

–  having regard to the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, to the UN Convention on the elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, to the UN Convention on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination, and to the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities,

–  having regard to the Yogyakarta Principles and on the application of International Human Rights Law in Relation to Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity, Gender Expression and Sex Characteristics,

–  having regard to the Commission communication of 12 November 2020 entitled ‘Union of Equality: LGBTIQ Equality Strategy 2020-2025’ (COM(2020)0698),

–  having regard to its resolution of 14 September 2021 on LGBTIQ rights in the EU(1),

–  having regard to the Commission’s progress report on the implementation of the LGBTIQ Equality Strategy 2020-2025,

–  having regard to its resolution of 11 March 2021 on the declaration of the EU as an LGBTIQ Freedom Zone(2),

–  having regard to its resolution of 17 September 2020 on the proposal for a Council decision on the determination of a clear risk of a serious breach by the Republic of Poland of the rule of law(3),

–  having regard to its resolution of 8 July 2021 on breaches of EU law and of the rights of LGBTIQ citizens in Hungary as a result of the legal changes adopted by the Hungarian Parliament(4),

–  having regard to its resolution of 20 October 2022 on growing hate crimes against LGBTIQ+ people across Europe in light of the recent homophobic murder in Slovakia(5),

–  having regard to its resolution of 29 April 2023 on the universal decriminalisation of homosexuality in the light of recent developments in Uganda(6),

–  having regard to the Commission proposal of 7 December 2022 for a Council regulation on jurisdiction, applicable law, recognition of decisions and acceptance of authentic instruments in matters of parenthood and on the creation of a European Certificate of Parenthood (COM(2022)0695),

–  having regard to the study by its Directorate-General for Parliamentary Research Services of December 2023 entitled ‘The LGBTIQ Equality Strategy 2020-2025 – Implementation overview’(7),

–  having regard to the EU Guidelines for Strategies and Action Plans to Enhance LGBTIQ Equality prepared by the Commission in 2022,

–  having regard to Commission Implementing Decision (EU) 2024/442 of 24 January 2024 on the request for registration, pursuant to Regulation (EU) 2019/788 of the European Parliament and of the Council, of the European citizens’ initiative entitled Ban on conversion practices in the European Union(8),

–  having regard to Rule 54 of its Rules of Procedure, as well as Article 1(1)(e) of, and Annex 3 to, the decision of the Conference of Presidents of 12 December 2002 on the procedure for granting authorisation to draw up own-initiative reports,

–  having regard to the report of the Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs (A9-0030/2024),

A.  whereas LGBTIQ+ rights are fundamental rights, and checks and balances as regards the rule of law and democracy are crucial for the protection of LGBTIQ rights; whereas the safety and dignity of LGBTIQ+ people is the safety and dignity of all of us;

B.  whereas the right to equal treatment and non-discrimination is a fundamental right enshrined in the Treaties and in the Charter, and should be fully respected;

C.  whereas equality and the protection of minorities are among the EU values enshrined in Article 2 TEU;

D.  whereas Article 21 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) establishes that every citizen of the Union shall have the right to move and reside freely within the territory of the Member States;

E.  whereas all Member States have assumed obligations and duties under international law and the EU Treaties to respect, guarantee, protect and fulfil fundamental rights;

F.  whereas progress has been made in protecting and promoting LGBTIQ+ rights in some Member States;

G.  whereas discrimination based on actual or perceived sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, and sex characteristics (SOGIESC) persists throughout the EU;

H.  whereas developments in some Member States have shown that progress on LGBTIQ+ rights cannot be taken for granted;

I.  whereas in 2022, the Commission together with Parliament and 15 Member States, referred Hungary to the CJEU over violations of LGBTIQ rights;

J.  whereas Latvia should join the LGBTIQ Equality Subgroup set up under the High-Level Group on Nondiscrimination, Equality and Diversity – as the last Member State to do so after Cyprus recently expressed its interest – with the goal to enhance implementation of the LGBTIQ strategy in all Member States;

K.  whereas Parliament condemned, in the strongest possible terms, discriminatory laws, policies and practices against LGBTIQ+ people, such as the ‘Anti-Homosexuality Bill’ in Uganda;

L.  whereas on 30 November 2023 Russia’s Supreme Court banned the ‘international LGBT movement’ declaring it an extremist organisation; whereas this decision is a severe attack against LGBTIQ+ people and human rights defenders in Russia and it will have a grave impact on their situation; whereas LGBTIQ+ people in China have experienced increased harassment and censorship, including online;

M.  whereas the International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Intersex Association (ILGA) Europe’s 2023 Annual Review has documented the highest numbers of acts of violence against LGBTIQ+ persons in 12 years;

N.  whereas the growth of anti-rights rhetoric, including by elected politicians has contributed to creating a hostile environment for LGBTIQ+ persons and those advocating LGBTIQ+ rights;

O.  whereas building safe, free, inclusive societies for LGBTIQ+ persons implies addressing multiple and intersectional manifestations of discrimination, exclusion and violence;

P.  whereas LGBTIQ+ persons face discrimination and violence worldwide;

Q.  whereas the European Union has made commitments to promote and protect LGBTIQ+ rights worldwide;

R.  whereas all forms and manifestations of hatred and intolerance, including hate speech and hate crime, are incompatible with the EU values of human dignity, freedom, democracy, equality, rule of law and respect for human rights, as enshrined in Article 2 of the TEU;

S.  whereas so-called ‘conversion practices’ can rely on different methods such as electroshocks, taking hormones or exorcism rites that amount to practices of torture; and it is estimated that 2 % of LGBTIQ+ persons in the EU have been actually submitted to such ‘conversion practices’ and 5 % have been offered conversion, although the real figures could be much higher;

T.  whereas the European citizens’ initiative (ECI) entitled ‘Ban on conversion practices in the European Union’ was submitted to the Commission on 27 November 2023; whereas it calls for the EU to take action to propose a binding legal ban on conversion practices targeting LGBTIQ+ citizens in the European Union; whereas the Commission fully registered this ECI on 21 January 2024;

Main conclusions

1.  Welcomes the Commission’s LGBTIQ Equality Strategy 2020-2025, adopted by the European Commission on 12 November 2020 (COM(2020)0698), and its recent Progress Report on the implementation of the Strategy; notes the European Commission’s commitment to support Member States in their implementation of the Strategy, expresses deep concern about the disparities in openness to the Strategy between the Member States; welcomes the efforts by the European Commission to advance equality for LGBTIQ+ persons in all fields included in the Strategy; regrets that certain key actions originally envisaged by the Commission have not been implemented so far;

2.  Acknowledges the progress made for the implementation of the LGBTIQ Equality Strategy 2020-2025 while stressing that real equality for LGBTIQ+ persons in the EU is still far away from current reality; expresses concern about the discrimination and violence suffered by LGBTIQ+ persons in the EU and their consequences for the full enjoyment of free and dignified lives;

3.  Deplores the fact that the horizontal anti-discrimination directive has been blocked in the Council since 2008; considers that any update to this proposal by the Commission must build on Parliament’s position, address intersectional discrimination and explicitly prohibit discrimination on any combination of grounds listed in the Charter; regrets that the Council has ignored these requests and urges the Council to integrate them in its mandate and to take all appropriate actions to fight discrimination in the EU;

4.  Calls for the inclusion of all the grounds of sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression and sex characteristics in the EU anti-discrimination legislation, based on a broad interpretation of the grounds of sexual orientation and sex and the principle of equality between women and men set forth in the Treaties; notes that this will ensure legal certainty and comprehensiveness of the protection of LGBTIQ+ people;

5.  Underlines that LGBTIQ+ persons are disproportionately affected by homelessness, poverty and socio-economic exclusion; expresses concern with the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and the cost of living and housing crisis over the lives of LGBTIQ+ people; reiterates that housing is a fundamental right;

6.  Regrets that despite EU legislation prohibiting discrimination based on sexual orientation in employment and occupation, LGBTIQ+ persons still face barriers to accessing employment, in particular decent jobs; expresses the view that LGBTIQ+ rights are workers’ rights;

7.  Underlines that discrimination on the grounds of actual or perceived sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression and sex still has a significant impact on LGBTIQ+ people’s physical, mental and sexual health and well-being; regrets that LGBTIQ+ people still face discrimination in accessing healthcare; underlines that access to healthcare should be offered as a universal, timely and accessible public service;

8.  Emphasises the need for an inclusive and safe education for LGBTIQ+ persons in all Member States, especially for LGBTIQ+ youths;

9.  Regrets that LGBTIQ+ people still face discrimination in some Member States regarding access to social protection, social security, access to the supply of goods and other sectors or services;

10.  Regrets that older LGBTIQ+ people are particularly affected by the lack of LGBTIQ+ rights, further exacerbating a sense of social isolation and barriers to access to essential services; highlights that the older LGBTIQ+ population is often neglected in the design of public policies and of projects, including in those tailored for LGBTIQ+ people; underlines that the older LGBTIQ+ population is disproportionately affected by poverty and the lack of access to decent housing and adequate care networks; underlines that a European LGBTIQ Freedom Zone cannot leave anyone behind;

11.  Stresses that care services for LGBTIQ+ people must always ensure the dignity, independence, autonomy, well-being and participation in social life of those receiving it, including the possibility of home-care and of community-based services;

12.  Notes that LGBTIQ+ people in rural, peripheral and outermost regions face particular challenges and barriers to their access to essential services;

13.  Expresses deep concern over LGBTIQ+ persons needing to exercise their right to request asylum in the European Union; expresses concern that trans and intersex persons face additional obstacles in the process of applying for asylum; underlines the importance that the situation of LGBTIQ+ persons is taken into account when designing the Union's asylum and migration policy;

14.  Expresses deep concern with the rise of hate speech, hate crimes and violence against LGBTIQ+ persons, including in online platforms, where it could lead to breaching privacy rights of viewers of LGBTIQ+ content; recalls the need for preventive and protective public policy regarding bias-motivated hate speech, hate crimes and violence against LGBTIQ+ persons; recognises there is an under-reporting of cases of hate speech and crimes against LGBTIQ+ people, due to a lack of trust and confidence in public authorities to tackle such crimes;

15.  Condemns the fact that the rise of far-right political forces has motivated an increase in the stigmatisation, harassment, violence and persecution of LGBTIQ+ persons and LGBTIQ+ civil society organisations and activists; condemns the increasing scapegoating of the LGBTIQ+ community and the harmful designation of the promotion of LGBTIQ+ rights as an ‘ideology’;

16.  Underlines the need for the EU to address the situation of LGBTIQ+ persons in formal negotiations with candidate countries and to support all enlargement countries to close legislative gaps and secure fundamental rights of LGBTIQ+ persons;

17.  Insists that the EU needs to take a common approach to the legal recognition of same-sex marriages and partnerships, and of rainbow parents, including trans parents, and to legal gender recognition, to ensure the best interests of children in line with CJEU and ECtHR case law;

18.  Highlights the challenges faced by trans, non-binary and intersex people in the EU, particularly as regards their socio-economic and sociodemographic status; underlines how the absence of legal gender recognition procedures or barriers to accessing them in Member States violate the rights and hinder the aspirations of trans, non-binary and intersex people across the Union;

19.  Insists that rainbow families have a right to free movement in the EU, and the children of rainbow families should not be discriminated against in acquiring EU citizenship;

20.  Expresses concern that facial recognition and profiling technology might create greater risks for LGBTIQ+ people, in particular for trans and non-binary and intersex people;

21.  Regrets the lack of a cohesive overview of EU funding for LGBTIQ+ equality under the different programmes supporting the Strategy;

22.  Emphasises the urgency for the Commission to ensure access to funding for civil society organisations (CSOs) working for the human rights of LGBTIQ+ persons in the Union and in third countries; notes that adequate and flexible funding to CSOs advocating for LGBTIQ+ rights is an essential enabling condition for the protection and promotion of LGBTIQ+ rights, in the European Union and in third countries;

23.  Welcomes EU initiatives directed at protecting LGBTIQ+ human rights defenders and at facilitating their work of defending fundamental rights; emphasises the need for the EU to continue tackling the stigmatisation, intimidation, harassment of LGBTIQ+ human rights defenders across the world: welcomes the Commission’s support of LGBTIQ+ activists in Ukraine, especially through the ‘direct award’ modality since the start of the Russian invasion and war of aggression against Ukraine;

24.  Recalls that European humanitarian aid should be gender-, age-, protection- and LGBTIQ+-sensitive, while taking into consideration intersectionality as a cross-cutting principle, and in line with humanitarian principles;

25.  Underlines that the EU must leave no one behind in the protection of fundamental rights;

Recommendations

26.  Calls for the EU and the Member States to ensure the true mainstreaming of LGBTIQ+ rights across all EU policies; calls for policies to cover grounds of multiple and intersectional discrimination, which can be based on, among other grounds, socio-economic status, age, race, religion, actual or perceived sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression and sex characteristics or disability; calls for policies to consider the particular contexts of rural, peripheral and outermost regions;

27.  Calls for the EU and the Member States to include SOGIESC in the grounds taken into account in the EU anti-discrimination legislation, in line with Parliament’s mandate on the proposal for a directive on standards for equality bodies(9);

28.  Calls for the EU and the Member States to involve LGBTIQ+ persons in policymaking, including in the design and implementation of socio-economic and housing and education policies; calls on the Member States to tackle the cost of living and housing crisis, including by defining specific measures for the LGBTIQ+ people;

29.  Calls on the Member States to implement the Directive on equal treatment in employment and occupation;

30.  Welcomes the Commission’s proposal for a regulation on jurisdiction, applicable law, recognition of decisions and acceptance of authentic instruments in matters of parenthood and on the creation of a European Certificate of Parenthood to protect the rights of all children by ensuring that their parental ties, including particularly same-sex parents, established in one Member State are recognised in all EU Member States; asks the Commission to explore the potential of other legal bases in the Treaties, notably Article 19 and 21 TFEU, to ensure that LGBTIQ+ persons’ marriages, partnerships, parenthood and family lives are fully and unconditionally recognised by all Member States without discrimination and obstacles to free movement;

31.  Welcomes the Commission decision of 15 July 2021 to start legal action against Member States for violations of fundamental rights of LGBTIQ+ people; calls on the Commission to continue to monitor closely the implementation of EU law in the Member States and to launch infringement procedures in cases where the fundamental rights of LGBTIQ+ persons have been violated under Article 2 TEU, the Charter of Fundamental Rights or secondary legislation, where applicable; calls on the Commission to systemically have recourse to expedited procedures and applications for interim measures before CJEU;

32.  Calls on the Commission to ensure that Member States comply with the judgments of the CJEU and ECtHR, by addressing cases of non-compliance using the actions under Article 260(2) TFEU and the Rule of Law Conditionality Regulation, in particular on LGBTIQ+ persons and rainbow families crossing borders within the EU;

33.  Calls on all Member States to adhere to the Guidelines for Strategies and Action Plans to Enhance LGBTIQ Equality(10) as prepared by the LGBTIQ Equality Subgroup;

34.  Calls on the Member States to expand coverage of healthcare services, allowing LGBTIQ+ persons to seek specific care, including sexual and reproductive health and technologies; urges the Commission and the Member States to adopt measures to combat discrimination against LGBTIQ+ persons in the health sector;

35.  Calls on the Member States to provide greater funding for the provision of services for victims of gender-based violence and for them to support LGBTIQ+ victims, in particular LGBTIQ+ women, addressing their specific needs and experiences;

36.  Recalls the need to ensure that facial recognition and profiling technologies are guided by the principles of transparency, explainability, fairness, and accountability in order to address the biases and risks created for LGBTIQ+ people;

37.  Calls for the EU to give access to asylum to LGBTIQ+ persons, including those from third countries classified as safe countries;

38.  Calls on the Commission to ensure support for LGBTIQ+ equality in action under the Asylum, Migration and Integration Fund, as announced in the LGBTIQ Equality Strategy 2020-2025, and include said support in the Work Programme 2023-2025;

39.  Calls on the European Union Agency for Asylum (EUAA) to swiftly finalise its practical guidance on applicants with SOGIESC and for Member States to then adhere to this guidance;

40.  Calls on the Commission to monitor the impacts and fund CSOs and academic projects investigating the anti-gender movement, in order to effectively address it;

41.  Calls on the Commission and Member States to draw from the empirical and systematic knowledge built by CSOs and academic researchers when designing policies and programmes to support LGBTIQ+ people in Europe and around the world;

42.  Calls for the Union and Member States to recognise actual or perceived sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression and sex characteristics as bias-motivations; calls on the Commission and the Member States to address hate speech, hate crimes and violence motivated by SOGIESC bias, including online; welcomes the Commission’s initiative to extend the list of EU crimes in Article 83(1) TFEU to hate speech and hate crimes, which would allow for establishing minimum rules concerning the definition of criminal offences and sanctions applicable in all EU Member States; highlights the need to ensure a robust EU criminal law response to hate speech and hate crime; strongly regrets that almost two years have passed since the publication of the Commission communication and that the Council has made no progress on it, even though it was able to swiftly expand the list of EU crimes for other purposes; regrets such inaction in the light of the increase in hate speech and hate crimes; reiterates its call on the Council to work diligently towards a consensus so that the Commission can initiate the second stage of the procedure;

43.  Urges the Commission to take forward a programme of work to raise awareness and encourage the reporting of SOGIESC bias-motivated hate crimes; urges the Commission and the Member States to ensure police and judicial officers receive training on LGBTIQ+ issues, to better support LGBTIQ+ people and adequately investigate and prosecute cases of hate crimes;

44.  Calls on the Commission to explore the EU legal framework and the possible avenues that could be followed to counter and ban conversion practices at EU level, and push Member States to ban ‘conversion practices’ on the grounds of SOGIESC;

45.  Welcomes, as a first step, the Commission’s formal registration of the ECI entitled ‘Ban on conversion practices in the European Union’, as doing so recognises the legal grounds at European level to act on this issue; expresses its support for this ECI; calls on the Commission to act on it and to propose legal acts based on the Treaties and the ECI Regulation(11);

46.  Calls for a ban on genital mutilation, in particular intersex genital mutilation and female genital mutilation;

47.  Calls on Member States to continue to exchange best practices on safeguarding the fundamental rights of intersex children;

48.  Calls for a ban on forced abortions and on forced sterilisations; underlines the importance of LGBTIQ+ persons’ right to self-determination, autonomy and physical and mental health; underlines that the position of Parliament on the proposal for a directive on combating violence against women and domestic violence includes adding FGM, IGM and forced sterilisation to the list of EU crimes;

49.  Calls on the Member States to recognise marriage and parenthood of same-gender couples for the purposes of exercising rights derived from EU law, as required by the CJEU;

50.  Calls on the Member States to put in place accessible legal gender recognition legislation and procedures, with the support of the Commission;

51.  Calls on the Commission and the Member States to promote safe and inclusive environments in education, culture, sports and other sectors;

52.  Calls on the Member States to take further steps to guarantee equal rights for LGBTIQ+ people with disabilities, through explicit protections against discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity that are needed in all areas of life including employment, housing, education, public accommodations, and credit;

53.  Calls on the Member States to implement the Council Recommendations on Pathways to School Success, and especially to include measures against the discrimination of LGBTIQ+ persons, particularly LGBTIQ+ youths, to ensure safe and inclusive education;

54.  Urges the Commission and the Member States to step up measures to address bullying and harassment of LGBTIQ+ children and young people in schools and to raise awareness of those cases; underlines that such situations contribute to social exclusion;

55.  Calls on the Commission to expand the Erasmus+ funding under the topic ‘Promoting LGBT+ equality’ through active communication efforts in cooperation with national authorities;

56.  Calls for the EU to set an example and assume a leadership role on the promotion of LGBTIQ+ rights around the world, in line with its human rights guidelines on non-discrimination in external action;

57.  Calls on the Commission to instate a Special Representative for LGBTIQ+ Equality in the European External Action Service in order to ensure a horizontal implementation of the LGBTIQ Equality Strategy 2020-2025 abroad;

58.  Expresses concern about the state of LGBTIQ+ rights worldwide; calls on the Commission and European External Action Service (EEAS) to use development policy as a tool to enforce reforms in developing countries, to address the setback in the recognition and protection of these rights and to ensure rights for LGBTIQ+ persons;

59.  Calls on the Commission to ensure that LGBTIQ+ persons are given support as part of budgetary and funding instruments, as well as of wider development aid programmes;

60.  Calls on the Commission to support candidate countries and potential candidate countries in the implementation of EU legislation, including in the field of LGBTIQ+ rights, and monitor their progress;

61.  Calls on the Commission to further improve the possibility of regranting and to provide flexible funding to enable small, grassroots human rights defenders and other civil society actors working on the promotion of LGBTIQ+ rights to access such funding, in the Union and in third countries, in accordance with EU law;

62.  Calls on the Commission to further improve its communication about funding opportunities to promote LGBTIQ+ equality, particularly in Member States where equality has faced setbacks;

63.  Calls on the Commission to ensure that the Member States manage EU funds in compliance with the Charter, with the inclusion of the right to non-discrimination, as required by a horizontal ‘enabling condition’ under the Common Provisions Regulation(12) (CPR); stresses that no expenditure can be reimbursed by the Commission until the applicable enabling conditions have been fulfilled;

64.  Calls for the EU to continue tackling the stigmatisation and harassment of LGBTIQ+ human rights defenders (HRDs) and protecting HRDs in third countries; urges the EU to extend such mechanism to human rights defenders in the EU, allowing protecting LGBTIQ+ HRDs in Member States;

65.  Urges the EU to extend such protections to HRDs in EU Member States;

66.  Calls on the Commission to step up data collection on discrimination based on SOGIESC and to use this data in making inclusive public policies tailored for LGBTIQ+ persons and to support the Member States’ use of this data;

67.  Calls on all Member States to self-assess their progress in implementing the LGBTIQ Strategy and share their results with the Commission and Parliament;

68.  Calls on all Member States to adopt national LGBTIQ+ action plans and strategies until 2025;

69.  Calls on the Commission to draw up a new LGBTIQ+ Equality Strategy for 2025-2030, based on strong commitments, reflecting the Charter, the calls and expectations of Parliament, of CSOs and of LGBTIQ+ persons in Europe and around the world; ask the Commission to communicate a time line on the next LGBTIQ+ Equality Strategy before the 2024 European Parliament elections;

70.  Calls on the Commission to ensure that the next LGBTIQ+ Equality Strategy is driven by a more robust instrument, accompanied by a target-oriented implementation plan, a strong mainstreaming structure ensuring LGBTIQ+ rights are mainstreamed across all EU policies including all grounds of sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression and sex characteristics and resource allocation; to include a timeline and milestones, ensuring the monitoring, evaluation, accountability and learning processes, including the consultation of LGBTIQ+ organisations; further calls on the Commission to pay particular attention to groups in vulnerable situations, such as LGBTIQ+ children and youth;

71.  Calls on the Commission to secure a portfolio for an Equality and Diversity Commissioner in the next term;

72.  Encourages the introduction of an LGBTIQ+ rights coordinator in the EU Commission;

o
o   o

73.  Instructs its President to forward this resolution to the Council and the Commission, the governments and parliaments of the Member States and candidate countries, and the subnational parliaments and local authorities of the Member States and candidate countries.

(1) OJ C 117, 11.3.2022, p. 2.
(2) OJ C 474, 24.11.2021, p. 140.
(3) Texts adopted, P9_TA(2020)0225.
(4) Texts adopted, P9_TA(2021)0362.
(5) Texts adopted, P9_TA(2022)0372.
(6) Texts adopted, P9_TA(2023)0120.
(7) Study – ‘The LGBTIQ+ Equality Strategy 2020-2025 – Implementation overview’, European Parliament, Directorate-General for Parliamentary Research Services, 2023.
(8) OJ L, 2024/442, 05.02.2024, ELI: http://data.europa.eu/eli/dec_impl/2024/442/oj.
(9) Commission proposal of 7 December 2022 for a directive of the European Parliament and of the Council on standards for equality bodies in the field of equal treatment and equal opportunities between women and men in matters of employment and occupation, and deleting Article 20 of Directive 2006/54/EC and Article 11 of Directive 2010/41/EU (COM(2022)0688).
(10) Council Directive 2000/78/EC of 27 November 2000 establishing a general framework for equal treatment in employment and occupation (OJ L 303, 2.12.2000, p. 16).
(11) Regulation (EU) 2019/788 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 17 April 2019 on the European citizens’ initiative (OJ L 130, 17.5.2019, p. 55).
(12) Regulation (EU) 2021/1060 of 24 June 2021 laying down common provisions on the European Regional Development Fund, the European Social Fund Plus, the Cohesion Fund, the Just Transition Fund and the European Maritime, Fisheries and Aquaculture Fund and financial rules for those and for the Asylum, Migration and Integration Fund, the Internal Security Fund and the Instrument for Financial Support for Border Management and Visa Policy (OJ L 231, 30.6.2021, p. 159).

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