More fuel-efficient tyres mean lower emissions. New EU tyre labels will help you choose based on fuel efficiency, wet grip and noise level.

The EU has committed to cut its greenhouse gas emissions by at least 40% below 1990 levels by 2030 under the Paris Agreement. Road transport is responsible for about 22% of the EU’s greenhouse gas emissions and transport is the only sector where emissions remain higher than in 1990. In order to reach climate neutrality by 2050, the EU wants to cut emissions from transport 60% by 2050, compared with the 1990 level.


Tyres account for between 20% and 30% of a vehicle’s fuel consumption, which means that choosing more fuel-efficient tyres can help to reduce transport emissions. In order to help consumers make informed decisions, the EU is ithe EU is introducing a new labelling scheme for tyresntroducing a new labelling scheme for tyres.

Infographic on tyres emissions in the EU and the benefits of the new EU tyre labels  

New labels to help consumers


The labels will include information on fuel efficiency and wet grip, on a scale from A to G (similar to the energy labelling used for household appliances), as well as information about their external noise level, expressed in decibels.


Information on snow and ice grip can be added in the future, as well as information on mileage and abrasion (responsible for microplastic pollution) when a testing method becomes available.


Labels must be clearly visible to consumers, be on display in all situations where tyres are sold, including online, and should provide a QR code for easy scan.


Benefits of new EU labelling of tyres


New tyre labels will allow EU consumers to choose more fuel-efficient tyres, which can lead to great savings for them in terms of spending as well as lower emissions. Road safety is improved through better wet grip while information on noise levels help lower noise pollution caused by cars.


Next steps


The European Parliament approved the new labelling scheme on 13 May. The new rules will enter into force on 1 May 2021.


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