Go back to the Europarl portal

Choisissez la langue de votre document :

  • bg - български
  • es - español
  • cs - čeština
  • da - dansk
  • de - Deutsch
  • et - eesti keel
  • el - ελληνικά
  • en - English (Selected)
  • fr - français
  • ga - Gaeilge
  • hr - hrvatski
  • it - italiano
  • lv - latviešu valoda
  • lt - lietuvių kalba
  • hu - magyar
  • mt - Malti
  • nl - Nederlands
  • pl - polski
  • pt - português
  • ro - română
  • sk - slovenčina
  • sl - slovenščina
  • fi - suomi
  • sv - svenska
Parliamentary questions
24 January 2012
E-012018/11E-012430/11
Joint answer given by Mr Kallas on behalf of the Commission
Written questions : E-012018/11 , E-012430/11

Directive 2004/84/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 19 January 2001 on summer-time arrangements (1) not only regulates the dates and hours for the change of the clock but also obliges Member States to apply a time in summer which is one hour advanced compared to winter-time (the ‘normal time’). According to Articles 2 and 3 of the directive, the summer-time period shall begin (respectively end) in every Member State at exactly the same moment, namely at 1.00 a.m., Greenwich Mean Time, on the last Sunday in March (respectively the last Sunday in October). The directive clearly stipulates that summer-time shall be applied by all Member States (but the directive does not apply to the overseas territories of the Member States).

If Iceland joins the EU, it would be required to introduce summertime, unless the Accession Treaty would provide otherwise.

(1)OJ L 31, 2.2.2001, p. 21.

OJ C 285 E, 21/09/2012
Last updated: 26 January 2012Legal notice