Procedure : 2003/0297(COD)
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Document selected : A6-0134/2005

Texts tabled :

A6-0134/2005

Debates :

PV 06/06/2005 - 12

Votes :

PV 07/06/2005 - 6.1

Texts adopted :

P6_TA(2005)0211

REPORT     ***I
PDF 1813kWORD 2750k
3 May 2005
PE 347.278v03-00 A6-0134/2005

on the proposal for a decision of the European Parliament and of the Council laying down guidelines for trans-European energy networks and repealing Decisions No 96/391/EC and No 1229/2003/EC

(COM(2003)0742 – C5-0064/2004 – 2003/0297(COD))

Committee on Industry, Research and Energy

Rapporteur: Anne Laperrouze

DRAFT EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT LEGISLATIVE RESOLUTION
 EXPLANATORY STATEMENT

DRAFT EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT LEGISLATIVE RESOLUTION

on the proposal for a decision of the European Parliament and of the Council laying down guidelines for trans-European energy networks and repealing Decisions No 96/391/EC and No 1229/2003/EC

(COM(2003)0742 – C5-0064/2004 – 2003/0297(COD))

(Codecision procedure: first reading)

The European Parliament,

–   having regard to the Commission proposal to the European Parliament and the Council (COM(2003)0742)(1),

–   having regard to Article 251(2) and Article 156 of the EC Treaty, pursuant to which the Commission submitted the proposal to Parliament (C5-0064/2004),

–   having regard to Rule 51 of its Rules of Procedure,

–   having regard to the report of the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy and the opinions of the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs, the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety, and the Committee on Transport and Tourism (A6-0134/2005),

1.  Approves the Commission proposal as amended;

2.  Calls on the Commission to refer the matter to Parliament again if it intends to amend the proposal substantially or replace it with another text;

3.  Instructs its President to forward its position to the Council and Commission.

Text proposed by the Commission  Amendments by Parliament

Amendment 1

Recital 2

(2) The priorities for trans-European energy networks stem from the creation of a more open and competitive internal energy market as a result of the implementation of Directive 2003/54/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 26 June 2003 concerning common rules for the internal market in electricity and repealing Directive 96/32/EC and of Directive 2003/55/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 26 June 2003 concerning common rules for the internal market in natural gas and repealing Directive 98/30/EC. Those priorities follow the conclusions of the Stockholm European Council of March 2001 concerning the development of the infrastructures needed for the operation of the energy market. A special effort should be undertaken to achieve the objective of making greater use of renewable energy sources as a contribution to further a sustainable development policy. However, this should be achieved without creating disproportionate disturbances to the normal market equilibrium.

(2) The priorities for trans-European energy networks stem from the creation of a more open and competitive internal energy market as a result of the implementation of Directive 2003/54/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 26 June 2003 concerning common rules for the internal market in electricity and repealing Directive 96/32/EC and of Directive 2003/55/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 26 June 2003 concerning common rules for the internal market in natural gas and repealing Directive 98/30/EC. Those priorities follow the conclusions of the Stockholm European Council of March 2001 concerning the development of the infrastructures needed for the operation of the energy market. A special effort should be undertaken to achieve the objective of making greater use of renewable energy sources as a contribution to further a sustainable development policy. However, this should be achieved without creating disproportionate disturbances to the normal market equilibrium. Full account should also be taken of the objectives of the Community's transport policy and specifically the opportunity to reduce road traffic by using pipelines for natural gas and olefins.

Amendment 2

Recital 2 a (new)

 

(2a) This Decision will serve to move closer towards realising the objective, agreed on at the Barcelona European Council, of a minimum level of electricity interconnection between Member States equivalent to 10% of installed generating capacity in each Member State and thus improve network reliability and integrity and ensure that there is security of supply and that the internal market functions.

Or. es

Justification

The main electricity-related priority projects of European interest listed in Annexes I and IV concern interconnections between Member States and with third countries, reflecting the political agreement reached at the Barcelona European Council in March 2002.

Amendment 3

Recital 3

(3) As a rule the construction and maintenance of energy infrastructure should be subject to market principles. This is also in line with the common rules for the completion of the internal market in energy and the common rules on competition law which aim at the creation of a more open and competitive internal energy market. Community financial aid for construction and maintenance should therefore remain highly exceptional. Those exceptions should be duly justified.

(3) As a rule the construction and maintenance of energy infrastructure should be subject to market principles. This is also in line with the common rules for the completion of the internal market in energy and the common rules on competition law which aim at the creation of a more open and competitive internal energy market. Community financial aid for construction and maintenance should therefore remain exceptional. Those exceptions should be duly justified.

Justification

This amendment is intended to remove an element that might anticipate possible developments in the legislation applicable to trans-European networks.

Amendment 4

Recital 4

(4) Energy infrastructure should be constructed and maintained so as to enable the internal energy market to operate efficiently, without detracting from strategic and, where appropriate, universal service criteria.

(4) Energy infrastructure should be constructed and maintained so as to enable the internal energy market to operate efficiently, with due regard to the procedures for consulting the people affected, without detracting from strategic and universal service criteria and public service obligations.

Justification

When new infrastructure is built and the arrangements for maintaining or enhancing it are laid down, the impact which these will have on the environment and the surrounding area must be taken into account and procedures for the prior notification and consultation of the general public in accordance with current Community rules must be followed.

Amendment 5

Recital 5

(5) The priorities for trans-European energy networks also stem from the growing importance of the trans-European energy networks for securing and diversifying the Community’s energy supplies, incorporating the energy networks of the acceding countries, and ensuring the coordinated operation of the energy networks in the Community and in neighbouring countries. Indeed neighbouring countries to the European Union play a vital role in the Union’s energy policy. They supply a major part of the EU’s requirements of natural gas, they are key partners for the transit of primary energy to the EU and they will progressively become important players in the Community’s internal gas and electricity markets.

(5) The priorities for trans-European energy networks also stem from the growing importance of the trans-European energy networks for securing and diversifying the Community’s energy supplies, incorporating the energy networks of the new Member States and acceding countries, and ensuring the coordinated operation of the energy networks in the Community and in neighbouring countries after consulting the Member States concerned. Indeed neighbouring countries to the European Union play a vital role in the Union’s energy policy. They supply a major part of the EU’s requirements of natural gas, they are key partners for the transit of primary energy to the EU and they will progressively become important players in the Community’s internal gas and electricity markets.

Justification

The incorporation of new Member States' energy networks into trans-European networks will facilitate the cohesion process in the enlarged EU. The development of alternative energy sources is also important in achieving technological progress in the EU's industry and will diversify energy supply sources.

Amendment 6

Recital 8

(8) Since the project specifications are liable to change, they are given indicatively. The Commission should therefore be empowered to update them. Since the project may have considerable political and economic implications, it is important to find the appropriate balance between legislative oversight and flexibility in determining projects that merit potential Community support.

(8) Since the project specifications are liable to change, they are given indicatively. The Commission should therefore be empowered to update them. Since the project may have considerable political, environmental and economic implications, it is important to find the appropriate balance between legislative oversight and flexibility in determining projects that merit potential Community support.

Justification

Building high voltage lines, high-pressure gas pipelines or storage facilities may have not only considerable political and economic implications but environmental ones as well.

Amendment 7

Recital 10

(10) A more favourable context for the development of trans-European energy networks should be created, mainly by providing stimulus for technical cooperation between the entities responsible for networks, by facilitating the implementation of authorization procedures applied for network projects in the Member States in order to reduce delays and by mobilizing as appropriate the Funds, instruments and financial programmes of the Community available for network projects.

(10) A more favourable context for the development and construction of trans-European energy networks should be created, mainly by providing stimulus for technical cooperation between the entities responsible for the operation and regulation of electricity and gas systems, by facilitating the implementation of authorization procedures applied for network projects in the Member States in order to reduce delays and by mobilizing as appropriate the Funds, instruments and financial programmes of the Community available for network projects. The European Union should support Member State measures taken in pursuit of that objective.

Justification

In this legislative act, the European Union should support all Member State measures concerning electricity networks and natural gas networks which are taken in the interests of security of supply and a favourable environment.

Amendment 8

Recital 10 a (new)

 

(10a) Since the budget allocated to the trans-European energy networks is relatively modest and mainly intended to finance feasibility studies, it is the Community Structural Funds, financial programmes and instruments that should enable, if necessary, funding to be provided for such - in particular interregional - interconnection networks.

Or. xm

Justification

It should again be expressly pointed out that the European budget for the expansion of trans-European energy networks is not very large. Assistance can currently be provided solely for funding feasibility studies; as a rule, that accounts for less than 1% of total investment costs for TEN projects. It is therefore important that attention be drawn here to other sources of European assistance for the actual construction of new networks.

Amendment 9

Recital 11

(11) The identification of projects of common interest, their specifications and priority projects should be without prejudice to the results of the environmental impact assessment of the projects and of the plans or programmes.

(11) The identification of projects of common interest, their specifications and priority projects, in particular those of European interest, should be without prejudice to the results of the environmental impact assessment of the projects and of the plans or programmes.

Or. en

Justification

This amendment is intended to make the above provision more consistent with the provisions set out in Articles 8 and 9.

Amendment 10

Article 1

This Decision defines the nature and scope of Community action to establish guidelines for trans-European energy networks. It establishes a series of guidelines covering the objectives, priorities and broad lines of action by the Community in respect of trans-European energy networks. These guidelines identify projects of common interest, including those which have priority, among trans-European electricity and gas networks.

This Decision defines the nature and scope of Community action to establish guidelines for trans-European energy networks. It establishes a series of guidelines covering the objectives, priorities and broad lines of action by the Community in respect of trans-European energy networks. These guidelines identify projects of common interest and those which have priority, including projects of European interest, among trans-European electricity and gas networks.

Justification

See justification for Amendment 9.

Amendment 11

Article 3, point (a)

(a) encouraging effective operation of the internal market in general and of the internal energy market in particular, while encouraging the rational and proportional production, transportation, distribution and utilisation of energy resources and the development and connection of renewable energy resources, so as to reduce the cost of energy to the consumer and contribute to the diversification of energy sources;

(a) encouraging effective operation and development of the internal market in general and of the internal energy market in particular, while encouraging the rational production, transportation, distribution and utilisation of energy resources and the development and connection of renewable energy resources, so as to reduce the cost of energy to the consumer and contribute to the diversification of energy sources;

Justification

This amendment seeks to remove the interpretation difficulties arising from the use of the term ‘proportional’.

Amendment 12

Article 3, point (d)

(d) contributing to sustainable development and improving the protection of the environment, in particular by reducing the environmental risks associated to the transportation and transmission of energy.

(d) enhancing sustainable development and protection of the environment, in particular involving cogeneration, energy efficiency, energy services and renewable energies and by reducing the social and environmental risks associated with the transportation and transmission of energy.

Or. de

Justification

The new wording makes it clearer how the interconnection of European energy networks should contribute to sustainable development and enhanced environmental protection.

Amendment 13

Article 4, point 1, introductory part

1) for both electricity and gas networks:

1) for both electricity and gas networks, taking particular account of olefin gas networks:

Or. de

Justification

Olefin gas networks already exist in the European Union, though they are not always interconnected. To ensure long-term security of supply for existing locations, it is essential to interconnect individual centres. Scope for this should also be provided in this decision by taking account of the special requirements and present specific characteristics of olefin gas networks.

Amendment 14

Article 5, point (a)

(a) the identification of projects of common interest, including those which have priority;

(a) the identification of projects of common interest and priority projects, including those which are of European interest;

Justification

See justification for Amendment 9.

Amendment 15

Article 6, paragraph 1, subparagraph 2

The evaluation of the economic viability shall be based upon a cost-benefit analysis which shall take account of all costs and benefits, including those in the medium and/or long term, in connection with environmental aspects, security of supply and the contribution to economic and social cohesion. Projects of common interest which relate to the territory of a Member State shall require the approval of the Member State concerned.

The evaluation of the economic viability shall be based upon a cost-benefit analysis which shall take account of all costs and benefits, including those in the medium and/or long term, in connection with all environmental externalities and other environmental aspects, security of supply and the contribution to economic and social cohesion. Projects of common interest which relate to the territory of a Member State shall require the approval of the Member State concerned.

Justification

Taking account of all external costs, in terms of the environment, must be an integral component of an evaluation of economic viability.

Amendment 16

Article 7, paragraph 2, subparagraph 1 a (new)

 

As regards cross-border investment projects, Member States shall take the steps required to ensure that, under national authorisation procedures, the fact that such projects increase the capacity for interconnection of two or more Member States and consequently strengthen Europe-wide security of supply is treated as a decisive criterion for the assessment by the proper national authorities.

Justification

The Commission proposal recognises the need to increase interconnection capacities substantially. However, the fact that project implementation is very slow and unsatisfactory needlessly puts up the price of projects and adversely affects consumers and Europe-wide security of supply where electricity and gas are concerned.

Amendment 17

Article 7, paragraph 3

3. Priority projects shall be compatible with sustainable development and meet the following criteria:

 

(a) They shall have a significant impact on the competitive operation of the internal market, and/or

 

(b) they shall strengthen security of supply in the Community.

3. Priority projects shall be compatible with sustainable development and meet the following criteria:

 

(a) They shall have a significant impact on the competitive operation of the internal market, and/or

 

(b) they shall strengthen security of supply in the Community and/or

(c) they shall result in an increase in the use of renewable energies, energy efficiency services or cogeneration.

Or. fr

Justification

Priority projects 'compatible with sustainable development' must be in line with other EU energy policies (concerning renewables, cogeneration and/or energy services).

Amendment 18

Article 8, paragraph 1

1. A selection of projects on the priority axes referred to in Article 7 which are of cross-border nature or which have significant impact on cross-border transmission capacity are declared to be of European Interest. Those projects are set out in Annex IV.

1. A selection of projects on the priority axes referred to in Article 7 which are of cross-border nature or which have significant impact on cross-border transmission capacity are declared to be of European interest. Those projects are set out in Annex I.

Justification

Consistent with the recasting of Annexes I and IV.

Amendment 19

Article 8, paragraph 8

8. If a project is declared to be of European interest the Member States concerned shall carry out, for each section of the project in question as appropriate, coordinated evaluation and public consultation procedures prior to authorisation of the project.

8. To ensure that project authorisation procedures are completed within a reasonable time, if a project is declared to be of European interest the Member States concerned shall coordinate, for each section of the project in question as appropriate, their environmental and socio-economic impact assessment and public consultation procedures prior to authorisation of the project.

Justification

Until such time as a transnational inquiry procedure has been adopted, the national legislation in force should be complied with.

Furthermore, project assessment should also cover the socio-economic impact.

Amendment 20

Article 10, paragraph 1, subparagraph 1

1. The Commission may designate, after consultation of the Member States concerned, a European Coordinator.

1.Where projects pose implementation difficulties, the Commission may designate, after consultation of the Member States concerned, a European Coordinator.

Justification

The idea is to ensure that coordinators will be appointed only when projects have to be implemented under particularly complex and difficult conditions

Amendment 21

Article 10, paragraph 6 a (new)

 

6a. The level of co-ordination shall be proportionate to the costs of the project to avoid unnecessary administrative burdens.

Amendment 22

Article 11, paragraph 1, introductory part

1. In order to contribute to creating a more favourable context for the development of trans-European energy networks and their interoperability, the Community attaches the greatest importance to the following measures and shall promote them as necessary:

1. In order to contribute to creating a more favourable context for the development of trans-European energy networks and their interoperability, the Community shall take account of Member States' efforts made in line with that objective, attaches the greatest importance to the following measures and shall promote them as necessary:

Justification

To speed up the development and interoperability of trans-European energy networks in the interests of the internal market, on competition law grounds too, the Commission should take account of efforts by Member States in pursuit of that overriding objective.

Amendment 23

Article 12

When projects are considered, their effects on competition shall be taken into account. Private financing or financing by the economic operators shall be encouraged while respecting competition and other EU rules. Any competitive distortion between market operators shall be avoided, in accordance with the provisions of the EC Treaty.

When projects are considered, their effects on competition and on security of supply shall be taken into account. Private financing or financing by the economic operators shall be encouraged while respecting competition and other EU rules. Any competitive distortion between market operators shall be avoided, in accordance with the provisions of the EC Treaty.

Justification

When projects are considered, security of supply in the European Union should also play a significant role, in addition to competition, under this decision.

Amendment 24

Annex I, Electricity networks

Priority projects as defined in Article 7

Priority project axes, including sites of projects of European interest, as defined in Articles 7 and 8

 

The priority projects, including projects of European interest, to be carried out on each priority axis are listed below.

ELECTRICITY NETWORKS

ELECTRICITY NETWORKS

EL.1. France – Belgium – Netherlands – Germany:

EL.1.France – Belgium – Netherlands – Germany:

electricity network reinforcements in order to resolve congestion in electricity flow through the Benelux.

electricity network reinforcements in order to resolve congestion in electricity flow through the Benelux.

 

Including the following projects of European interest:

 

Aveline (FR) – Avelgem (BE) line

 

Moulaine (FR) – Aubange (BE) line

EL.2. Borders of Italy with France, Austria, Slovenia and Switzerland:

EL.2. Borders of Italy with France, Austria, Slovenia and Switzerland:

increasing electricity interconnection capacities.

increasing electricity interconnection capacities.

 

Including the following projects of European interest:

 

Lienz (AT) – Cordignano (IT) line

 

New interconnection between Italy and Slovenia

 

Udine Ovest (IT) – Okroglo (SI) line

 

S. Fiorano (IT) – Nave (IT) – Gorlago (IT) line

 

Venezia Nord (IT) – Cordignano (IT) line

 

Austria-Italy (Thaur-Brixen) interconnection through the Brenner rail tunnel

EL.3. France – Spain – Portugal:

EL.3. France – Spain – Portugal:

increasing electricity interconnection capacities between these countries and for the Iberian peninsula and grid development in island regions.

increasing electricity interconnection capacities between these countries and for the Iberian peninsula and grid development in island regions.

 

Including the following projects of European interest:

 

Sentmenat (ES) – Becanó (ES) – Baixas (FR) line

 

Valdigem (PT) – Douro Internacional (PT) – Aldeadávila (ES) line and Douro Internacional facilities

EL.4. Greece – Balkan countries – UCTE System:

EL.4. Greece – Balkan countries – UCTE System:

development of electricity infrastructure to connect Greece to the UCTE System and to enable the South-Eastern Europe electricity market.

development of electricity infrastructure to connect Greece to the UCTE System and to enable the South-Eastern Europe electricity market.

 

Including the following projects of European interest:

 

Philippi (EL) – Hamidabad (TR) line

EL.5. United Kingdom – Continental Europe and Northern Europe:

EL.5. United Kingdom – Continental Europe and Northern Europe:

establishing/increasing electricity interconnection capacities and possible integration of offshore wind energy.

establishing/increasing electricity interconnection capacities and possible integration of offshore wind energy.

 

Including the following projects of European interest:

 

Undersea cable to link England (UK) and the Netherlands

EL.6. Ireland – United Kingdom:

EL.6. Ireland – United Kingdom:

increasing electricity interconnection capacities and possible integration of offshore wind energy.

increasing electricity interconnection capacities and possible integration of offshore wind energy.

 

Including the following projects of European interest:

 

Undersea cable to link Ireland and Wales (UK)

EL.7. Denmark – Germany – Baltic Ring (including Norway – Sweden – Finland – Denmark – Germany – Poland – Baltic States – Russia):

EL.7. Denmark – Germany – Baltic Ring (including Norway – Sweden – Finland – Denmark – Germany – Poland – Baltic States – Russia):

increasing electricity interconnection capacities and possible integration of offshore wind energy.

increasing electricity interconnection capacities and possible integration of offshore wind energy.

 

Including the following projects of European interest:

 

Kasso (DK) – Hamburg/Dollern (DE) line

 

Hamburg/Krümmel (DE) – Schwerin (DE) line

 

Kasso (DK) – Revsing (DK) – Tjele (DK) line

 

V. Hassing (DK) - Trige (DK) line

 

Skagerrak 4 (DK) – (NO) undersea cable

 

Connection of Poland and Lithuania, upgrading the Polish electricity network and the PL-DE section as necessary to allow participation in the internal energy market.

 

Undersea cable to link Finland and Estonia (Estlink)

 

Fennoscan undersea cable to link Finland and Sweden

Halle/Saale (DE) – Schweinfurt (DE)

EL.8. Germany – Poland – Czech Republic – Slovakia – Austria – Hungary – Slovenia:

EL.8. Germany – Poland – Czech Republic – Slovakia – Austria – Hungary – Slovenia:

increasing electricity interconnection capacities.

increasing electricity interconnection capacities.

 

Including the following projects of European interest:

 

Neuenhagen (DE) – Vierraden (DE) – Krajnik (PL) line

 

Dürnrohr (AT) – Slavetice (CZ) line

 

New interconnection between Germany and Poland

 

Velke Kapusany (SK) – Lemesany (SK) – Moldava (SK) – Sajoivanka (HU)

 

Gabcikovo (SK) – Velky Dur (SK)

 

Stupava (SK) – south-east Vienna (AT)

EL.9. Mediterranean Member States – Mediterranean Electricity Ring:

EL.9. Mediterranean Member States – Mediterranean Electricity Ring:

increasing electricity interconnection capacities between Mediterranean Member States and Morocco – Algeria – Tunisia – Libya – Egypt – Near-East Countries – Turkey.

increasing electricity interconnection capacities between Mediterranean Member States and Morocco – Algeria – Tunisia – Libya – Egypt – Near-East countries – Turkey.

 

Including the following projects of European interest:

 

Electricity connection to link Tunisia and Italy

Justification

The purpose of this amendment is to update the list of priority projects, including projects of European interest, in the light of proceedings in the Council. The update has been agreed by both between the Commission and the Member States. The amendment also seeks to simplify the organisation of the annexes by combining Annexes I and IV to the Commission proposal.

Given their importance, projects of European interest need to be clearly shown in Annex I.

The reference to the ‘S. Fiorano (IT) – Robbia (CH) line’ has been removed because the project has already been implemented.

Amendment 25

Annex I, Gas networks

NG.1. United Kingdom – Northern Continental Europe, including Netherlands, Denmark and Germany – Poland – Lithuania – Latvia – Estonia – Finland – Russia:

NG.1. United Kingdom – Northern Continental Europe, including Netherlands, Belgium, Denmark, Sweden, and Germany – Poland – Lithuania – Latvia – Estonia – Finland – Russia:

North Transgas natural gas pipeline and Yamal – Europe natural gas pipeline, connecting some of the main sources of gas in Europe, improving the interoperability of the networks, and increasing the security of supply.

Gas pipelines to connect some of the main gas sources in Europe, improve network interoperability, and increase security of supply, including the North Transgas and Yamal – Europe natural gas pipelines, new pipeline building, and network capacity increases in and between Germany, Denmark, and Sweden, and in and between Poland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Germany, and Austria.

 

Including the following projects of European interest:

 

North Transgas gas pipeline

 

Yamal – Europe gas pipeline

 

Natural gas pipeline linking Denmark, Germany, and Sweden

 

Increase in transmission capacity on the Germany – Belgium – United Kingdom axis

NG.2. Algeria – Spain – Italy – France – Northern Continental Europe:

NG.2.Algeria – Spain – Italy – France – Northern Continental Europe:

construction of new natural gas pipelines from Algeria to Spain, France and Italy, and increasing network capacities in and between Spain, France and Italy.

construction of new natural gas pipelines from Algeria to Spain, France and Italy, and increasing network capacities in and between Spain, France and Italy.

 

Including the following projects of European interest:

 

Algeria – Tunisia – Italy gas pipeline

 

Algeria – Italy gas pipeline, via Sardinia and Corsica, with a branch to France

 

Medgas gas pipeline (Algeria – Spain – France – Continental Europe)

NG.3. Caspian Sea countries – Middle East – European Union:

NG.3. Caspian Sea countries – Middle East – European Union:

new natural gas pipeline networks to the European Union from new sources, including the Turkey – Greece, Greece – Italy and Turkey – Austria natural gas pipelines.

new natural gas pipeline networks to the European Union from new sources, including the Turkey – Greece, Greece – Italy, Turkey – Austria, and Greece – Slovenia – Austria (via the western Balkans) natural gas pipelines.

 

Including the following projects of European interest:

 

Turkey – Greece – Italy gas pipeline

 

Turkey – Austria gas pipeline

NG.4. LNG terminals in Belgium, France, Spain, Portugal, Italy and Poland:

NG.4. LNG terminals in Belgium, France, Spain, Portugal, Italy, Greece, Cyprus, and Poland:

diversifying sources of supply and entry points, including the LNG terminals connections with the transmission grid.

diversifying sources of supply and entry points, including the LNG terminals’ connections with the transmission grid.

NG.5. Underground natural gas storage in Spain, Portugal, Italy, Greece and the Baltic Sea Region:

NG.5. Underground natural gas storage in Spain, Portugal, France, Italy, Greece and the Baltic Sea region:

increasing capacity in Spain, Italy and the Baltic Sea Region and construction of the first facilities in Portugal and Greece.

increasing capacity in Spain, France, Italy and the Baltic Sea region and construction of the first facilities in Portugal, Greece, and Lithuania.

NG.6. Mediterranean Member States – East Mediterranean Gas Ring:

NG.6. Mediterranean Member States – East Mediterranean Gas Ring:

Establishing and increasing natural gas pipeline capacities between the Mediterranean Member States and Libya – Egypt – Jordan – Syria – Turkey.

Establishing and increasing natural gas pipeline capacities between the Mediterranean Member States and Libya – Egypt – Jordan – Syria – Turkey.

 

Including the following projects of European interest:

 

Libya – Italy gas pipeline

Justification

The purpose of this amendment is to update the list of priority projects, including projects of European interest, in the light of proceedings in the Council. The update has been agreed by both the Commission and the Member States. The amendment also seeks to simplify the organisation of the annexes by combining Annexes I and IV to the Commission proposal.

Given their importance, projects of European interest need to be clearly shown in Annex I.

Amendment 26

Annex II, Electricity networks

1. Developing electricity networks in island, isolated, peripheral and ultraperipheral regions while promoting the diversification of energy sources and enhancing the use of renewable energies, and connection of the electricity networks of those regions, if appropriate.

1. Developing electricity networks in island, isolated, peripheral and ultraperipheral regions while promoting the diversification of energy sources and enhancing the use of renewable energies, and connection of the electricity networks of those regions, if appropriate.

· Ireland – United Kingdom (Wales)

· Ireland – United Kingdom (Wales)

· Greece (Islands)

· Greece (islands)

· Italy (Sardinia) – France (Corsica) – Italy (mainland)

· Italy (Sardinia) – France (Corsica) – Italy (mainland)

· Connections in island regions, including connections to the mainland

· Connections in island regions, including connections to the mainland

· Connections in ultraperipheral regions in France, Spain, Portugal

· Connections in ultraperipheral regions in France, Spain, Portugal

2. Developing electricity connections between the Member States needed for the functioning of the internal market and in order to ensure the reliability and dependability of the operation of electricity networks.

2. Developing electricity connections between the Member States needed for the functioning of the internal market and in order to ensure the reliability and dependability of the operation of electricity networks.

· France – Belgium – Netherlands – Germany

· France – Belgium – Netherlands – Germany

· France – Germany

· France – Germany

· France – Italy

· France – Italy

· France – Spain

· France – Spain

· Portugal – Spain

· Portugal – Spain

· Finland – Sweden

· Finland – Sweden

· Finland – Estonia – Latvia – Lithuania

· Finland – Estonia – Latvia – Lithuania

· Austria – Italy

· Austria – Italy

· Italy – Slovenia

· Italy – Slovenia

· Austria – Italy – Slovenia – Hungary

· Austria – Italy – Slovenia – Hungary

· Germany – Poland

· Germany – Poland

· Germany – Poland – Czech Republic – Slovakia – Hungary

· Germany – Poland – Czech Republic – Austria – Slovakia – Hungary

· Poland – Lithuania

· Hungary – Slovakia

· Ireland – United Kingdom (Northern Ireland)

· Hungary – Austria

· Austria – Germany

· Poland – Lithuania

· Netherlands – United Kingdom

· Ireland – United Kingdom (Northern Ireland)

· Germany – Denmark – Sweden

· Austria – Germany – Slovenia – Hungary

· Greece – Italy

· Netherlands – United Kingdom

 

· Germany – Denmark – Sweden

 

· Greece – Italy

 

· Hungary – Slovenia

 

· Malta – Italy

 

· Finland – Estonia

 

· Italy – Slovenia

3. Developing electrical connections within the Member States where this is needed in order to take advantage of the connections between the Member States, the functioning of the internal market or the connection of renewable energy sources

3. Developing electrical connections within the Member States where this is needed in order to take advantage of the connections between the Member States, the functioning of the internal market or the connection of renewable energy sources.

· All Member States

· All Member States

4. Developing electricity connections with the non-Member States, and more particularly with the candidate countries for accession, thus contributing towards interoperability, the operational reliability and dependability of the electricity grids or the supply of electricity within the European Community.

4. Developing electricity connections with the non-member states, and more particularly with the candidate countries for accession, thus contributing towards interoperability, the operational reliability and dependability of the electricity grids or the supply of electricity within the European Community.

· Germany – Norway

· Germany – Norway

· The Netherlands – Norway

· The Netherlands – Norway

· Sweden – Norway

· Sweden – Norway

· United Kingdom – Norway

· United Kingdom – Norway

· Baltic Electricity Ring: Germany – Poland – Belarus – Russia – Lithuania – Latvia – Estonia – Finland – Sweden – Norway – Denmark

· Baltic Electricity Ring: Germany – Poland – Belarus – Russia – Lithuania – Latvia – Estonia – Finland – Sweden – Norway – Denmark

· Norway – Sweden – Finland – Russia

· Norway – Sweden – Finland – Russia

· Mediterranean Electricity Ring: France – Spain – Morocco – Algeria – Tunisia – Libya – Egypt – Near-Eastern Countries – Turkey – Greece – Italy

· Mediterranean Electricity Ring: France – Spain – Morocco – Algeria – Tunisia – Libya – Egypt – Near Eastern countries – Turkey – Greece – Italy

· Greece – Turkey

· Greece – Turkey

· Italy – Switzerland

· Italy – Switzerland

· Greece – Balkan Countries

· Austria – Switzerland

· Spain – Morocco

· Hungary – Romania

· EU – Balkan Countries – Belarus – Russia – Ukraine

· Hungary – Serbia

· Black Sea Electricity Ring: Russia – Ukraine – Romania – Bulgaria – Turkey – Georgia

· Hungary – Croatia

 

· Italy – Tunisia

 

· Greece – Balkan countries

 

· Spain – Morocco

 

· Spain – Andorra – France

 

· EU – Balkan countries – Belarus – Russia – Ukraine

 

· Black Sea Electricity Ring: Russia – Ukraine – Romania – Bulgaria – Turkey – Georgia

 

· Bulgaria – Macedonia/Greece – Albania – Italy or Bulgaria – Greece – Italy

5. Actions improving the functioning of the interconnected electricity networks within the internal market and, in particular, identifying the bottlenecks and missing links, developing solutions in order to deal with congestion and adapting the methods of forecasting and of operating electricity networks.

5. Actions improving the functioning of the interconnected electricity networks within the internal market and, in particular, identifying the bottlenecks and missing links, developing solutions in order to deal with congestion and adapting the methods of forecasting and of operating electricity networks.

· Identifying the bottlenecks and missing links, especially cross-border, within electricity networks

· Identifying the bottlenecks and missing links, especially cross-border, within electricity networks

· Developing solutions for electricity flow management in order to deal with the problems of congestion within electricity networks

· Developing solutions for electricity flow management in order to deal with the problems of congestion within electricity networks

· Adapting the methods of forecasting and of operating electricity networks required by the functioning of the internal market and the use of a high percentage of renewable energy sources

· Adapting the methods of forecasting and of operating electricity networks required by the functioning of the internal market and the use of a high percentage of renewable energy sources

Justification

The purpose of this amendment is to update the list of projects, in the light of proceedings in the Council. The update has been agreed by both the Commission and the Member States.

Amendment 27

Annex II, Gas networks

6. Introducing natural gas into new regions, mainly island, isolated, peripheral and ultraperipheral regions and developing natural gas networks in these regions.

6. Introducing natural gas into new regions, mainly island, isolated, peripheral and ultraperipheral regions and developing natural gas networks in these regions.

· United Kingdom (Northern Ireland)

· Ireland

· Spain

· Portugal

· Greece

· Sweden

· Denmark

· Italy (Sardinia)

· France (Corsica)

· Cyprus

· Malta

· Ultraperipheral Regions in France, Spain, Portugal

· United Kingdom (Northern Ireland)

· Ireland

· Spain

· Portugal

· Greece

· Sweden

· Denmark

· Italy (Sardinia)

· France (Corsica)

· Cyprus

· Malta

· Ultraperipheral regions in France, Spain, Portugal

7. Developing natural gas connections in order to meet the needs of the internal market or strengthening of the security of supply, including connection of separate natural gas networks

7. Developing natural gas connections in order to meet the needs of the internal market or strengthening of the security of supply, including connection of separate natural gas and olefin gas networks.

· Ireland – United Kingdom

· Ireland – United Kingdom

· France – Spain

· France – Spain

· France – Switzerland

· France – Switzerland

· Portugal – Spain

· Portugal – Spain

· Austria – Germany

· Austria – Germany

· Austria – Hungary

· Austria – Hungary

· Austria – Hungary – Slovakia – Poland

· Austria – Hungary – Slovakia – Poland

· Austria – Italy

· Poland – Czech Republic

· Greece – Other Balkan Countries

· Slovakia – Czech Republic – Germany – Austria

· Austria – Hungary – Romania – Bulgaria – Greece – Turkey

· Austria – Italy

· France – Italy

· Greece – Other Balkan countries

· Greece – Italy

· Austria – Hungary – Romania – Bulgaria – Greece – Turkey

· Austria – Czech Republic

· France – Italy

· Germany – Czech Republic – Austria – Italy

· Greece – Italy

· Austria – Slovenia – Croatia

· Austria – Czech Republic

· United Kingdom – The Netherlands – Germany

· Germany – Czech Republic – Austria – Italy

· Germany – Poland

· Austria – Slovenia – Croatia

· Denmark – United Kingdom

· Hungary – Croatia

· Denmark – Germany – Sweden

· Hungary – Romania

 

· Hungary – Slovakia

 

· Hungary – Ukraine

 

· Slovenia – Balkan countries

 

· Belgium – Netherlands – Germany

 

· United Kingdom – The Netherlands – Germany

 

· Germany – Poland

 

· Denmark – United Kingdom

 

· Denmark – Germany – Sweden

 

· Denmark – Netherlands

8. Developing natural gas connections in order to meet the needs of the internal market or strengthening of the security of supply, including connection of separate natural gas networks.

8. Developing capacities for receiving liquefied natural gas (LNG) and for storage of natural gas, needed in order to meet demand and control gas supply systems, and diversify sources and supply routes.

· All Member States

· All Member States

9. Developing natural gas transport capacity (gas supply pipelines) needed in order to meet demand and diversify supplies from internal and external sources, as well as supply routes.

9. Developing natural gas transport capacity (gas supply pipelines) needed in order to meet demand and diversify supplies from internal and external sources, as well as supply routes.

· Nordic Gas Grid: Norway – Denmark – Germany – Sweden – Finland – Russia – Baltic States – Poland

· Nordic Gas Grid: Norway – Denmark – Germany – Sweden – Finland – Russia – Baltic States – Poland

· Algeria – Spain – France

· Algeria – Spain – France

· Russia – Ukraine – EU

· Russia – Ukraine – EU

· Russia – Belarus – Ukraine – EU

· Russia – Belarus – Ukraine – EU

· Russia – Belarus – EU

· Russia – Belarus – EU

· Russia – Baltic Sea – Germany

· Russia – Baltic Sea – Germany

· Libya – Italy

· Russia – Baltic States – Poland – Germany

· Tunisia – Libya – Italy

· Germany – Czech Republic – Poland – Germany – Other Member States

· Caspian Sea Countries – EU

· Libya – Italy

· Russia – Ukraine – Moldavia – Romania – Bulgaria – Greece – Other Balkan Countries

· Tunisia – Libya – Italy

· Russia – Ukraine – Slovakia – Hungary – Slovenia – Italy

· Caspian Sea countries – EU

· The Netherlands – Germany – Switzerland – Italy

· Russia – Ukraine – Moldavia – Romania – Bulgaria – Greece – Slovenia – Other Balkan countries

· Belgium – France – Switzerland – Italy

· Russia – Ukraine – Slovakia – Hungary – Slovenia – Italy

· Denmark – (Sweden) – Poland

· The Netherlands – Germany – Switzerland – Italy

· Norway – Russia – EU

· Belgium – France – Switzerland – Italy

· Ireland

· Denmark – (Sweden) – Poland

· Algeria – Italy – France

· Norway – Russia – EU

· Middle East – East Mediterranean Gas Ring – EU

· Ireland

 

· Algeria – Italy – France

 

· Algeria – Tunisia – Italy

 

· Middle East – East Mediterranean Gas Ring – EU

 

· Winksele blending installation on north-south axis (blending of H gas with nitrogen)

 

· Capacity upgrade on east-west axis: Zeebrugge Eynatten

10. Actions improving the functioning of the interconnected natural gas networks within the internal market and transit countries, in particular, identifying the bottlenecks and missing links, developing solutions in order to deal with congestion and adapting methods of forecasting and of operating natural gas networks efficiently and safely.

10. Actions improving the functioning of the interconnected natural gas networks within the internal market and transit countries, in particular, identifying the bottlenecks and missing links, developing solutions in order to deal with congestion and adapting methods of forecasting and of operating natural gas networks efficiently and safely.

· Identifying the bottlenecks and missing links, especially cross-border, within the natural gas networks.

· Identifying the bottlenecks and missing links, especially cross-border, within the natural gas networks.

· Developing solutions for natural gas flow management in order to deal with the problems of congestion within the gas networks.

· Developing solutions for natural gas flow management in order to deal with the problems of congestion within the gas networks.

· Adapting the methods of forecasting and operating natural gas networks required by the functioning of the internal market.

· Adapting the methods of forecasting and operating natural gas networks required by the functioning of the internal market.

· Increase the overall performance, safety and security of the natural gas networks in transit countries.

· Increasing the overall performance, safety and security of the natural gas networks in transit countries.

11. Developing and integrating olefin gases transport capacity needed in order to meet demand within the internal market.

11. Developing and integrating olefin gases transport capacity needed in order to meet demand within the internal market.

· All Member States

· All Member States

Justification

The purpose of this amendment is to update the list of projects, in the light of proceedings in the Council. The update has been agreed by both the Commission and the Member States.

The reference to development and integration of olefin gas transport capacities has been retained, bearing in mind that a network of this type is important both from the point of view of the competitiveness of European industry and in terms of the benefits for safety and the environment.

Amendment 28

Annex III, Electricity networks

1. Developing electricity networks in isolated regions

1. Developing electricity networks in isolated regions

1.1 Submarine cable Ireland — Wales (UK)

 

1.1      Submarine cable Ireland — Wales (UK)

1.2 Reinforcement of the Ipiros (GR) — Puglia (IT) link

 

1.3 Connection of the Southern Cyclades (GR)

1.3 Connection of the Southern Cyclades (EL)

1.4 30 kV underwater cable link between the islands of Faial, Pico and S. Jorge (Azores, PT)

1.4 30 kV underwater cable link between the islands of Faial, Pico and S. Jorge (Azores, PT)

1.5 Connection and reinforcement of the grid in Terceira, Faial and S Miguel (Azores, PT)

1.5 Connection and reinforcement of the grid in Terceira, Faial and S Miguel (Azores, PT)

1.6 Connection and reinforcement of the grid in Madeira (PT)

1.6 Connection and reinforcement of the grid in Madeira (PT)

1.7 Submarine cable Sardinia (IT) — Italy mainland

1.7 Submarine cable Sardinia (IT) — Italy mainland

1.8 Submarine cable Corsica (FR) — Italy

1.8 Submarine cable Corsica (FR) — Italy

1.9 Connection Italy mainland — Sicily (IT)

1.9 Connection Italy mainland — Sicily (IT): doubling of the connection Sorgente (IT) — Rizziconi (IT)

1.10 Doubling of the connection Sorgente (IT) — Rizziconi (IT)

 

1.11 New connections in the Balearic and Canary Islands (ES)

1.11 New connections in the Balearic and Canary Islands (ES)

2. Developing electricity connections between the Member States

2. Developing electricity connections between the Member States

2.1 Moulaine (FR) – Aubange (BE) line

2.1 Moulaine (FR) – Aubange (BE) line

2.2 Avelin (FR) – Avelgem (BE) line

2.2 Avelin (FR) – Avelgem (BE) line

 

2.2a Interconnection between Germany and Belgium

2.3 Vigy (FR) – Marlenheim (FR) line

2.3 Vigy (FR) – Marlenheim (FR) line

2.4 Vigy (FR) – Uchtelfangen (DE) line

2.4 Vigy (FR) – Uchtelfangen (DE) line

2.5 La Praz (FR) phase transformer

2.5 La Praz (FR) phase transformer

2.6 Further increase of capacity through existing interconnection between France and Italy

2.6 Further increase of capacity through existing interconnection between France and Italy

2.7 New interconnection between France and Italy

2.7 New interconnection between France and Italy

2.8 New interconnection through the Pyrenees between France and Spain

2.8 New trans-Pyrenean interconnection between France and Spain

2.9 Eastern Pyrenees connection between France and Spain

2.9 Eastern Pyrenees connection between France and Spain

2.10 Connections between northern Portugal and north-western Spain

2.10 Connections between northern Portugal and north-western Spain

2.11 Sines (PT) – Alqueva (PT) – Balboa (ES) line

2.11 Sines (PT) – Alqueva (PT) – Balboa (ES) line

 

2.11a Connection between southern Portugal and south-western Spain

2.12 Valdigem (PT) – Douro Internacional (PT) – Aldeadávila (ES) line and Douro

Internacional facilities

2.12 Valdigem (PT) – Douro Internacional (PT) – Aldeadávila (ES) line and Douro

Internacional facilities

2.13 New connections north of the Gulf of Bothnia between Finland and Sweden

2.13 Connections north of the Gulf of Bothnia and Fennoscan undersea cable between Finland and Sweden

2.14 Lienz (AT) – Cordignano (IT) line

2.14 Lienz (AT) – Cordignano (IT) line

 

2.14a Somplago (IT) – Wuermlach (AT) interconnection

 

2.14b Austria-Italy (Thaur-Brixen) interconnection through the Brenner rail tunnel

2.15 New connection between Italy and Austria at the Brenner Pass

 

2.16 Connection between Ireland and Northern Ireland

2.16 Connection between Ireland and Northern Ireland

2.17 St Peter (AT) – Isar (DE) line

 

2.17 St Peter (AT) – Isar (DE) line

2.18 Submarine cable between South-eastern England and central Netherlands

2.18 Submarine cable between south-eastern England and central Netherlands

2.19 Reinforcement of connections between Denmark and Germany, e.g. the Kasso – Hamburg line

2.19 Reinforcement of connections between Denmark and Germany, e.g. the Kasso – Hamburg line

2.20 Reinforcement of the connections between Denmark and Sweden

2.20 Reinforcement of the connections between Denmark and Sweden

 

2.21 New interconnection between Slovenia and Hungary: Cirkovce (SI) – Heviz (HU)

 

2.22 Sajoivanka (HU) – Rimavska Sobota (SK)

 

2.23 Moldava – Sajoivanka (HU)

 

2.24 Stupava (SK) – south-east Vienna (AT)

 

2.25 Poland – Germany line (Neuenhagen (DE) – Vierraden (DE) – Krajnik (PL)

 

2.26 Poland – Lithuania link (Elk – Alytus)

 

2.27 Undersea cable to link Finland and Estonia

 

2.28 Installation of flexible alternating current transmission systems linking Italy and Slovenia

 

2.29 New connections to link the UCTE and CENTREL systems

 

2.30 Dürnrohr (AT) – Slavetice (CZ)

 

2.31 Undersea electricity connection to link Malta (MT) and Sicily (IT)

 

2.32 New interconnections between Italy and Slovenia

 

2.33 Udine Ovest (IT) – Okroglo (SI) line

3 Developing electrical connections within the Member States

3 Developing electrical connections within the Member States

3.1 Connections on the Danish East –West axis: connection between Denmark’s western (UCTE) and eastern (NORDEL) networks

3.1 Connections on the Danish east-west axis: connection between Denmark’s western (UCTE) and eastern (NORDEL) networks

3.2 Connection on the Danish North–South axis

3.2 Connection on the Danish north–south axis

3.3 New connections in Northern France

3.3 New connections in northern France

3.4 New connections in South Western France

3.4 New connections in south-western France

3.5 Trino Vercellese (IT) – Lacchiarella (IT) line

3.5 Trino Vercellese (IT) – Lacchiarella (IT) line

3.6 Turbigo (IT) – Rho – Bovisio (IT) line

3.6 Turbigo (IT) – Rho – Bovisio (IT) line

3.7 Voghera (IT) – La Casella (IT) line

3.7 Voghera (IT) – La Casella (IT) line

3.8 S. Fiorano (IT) – Nave (IT) line

3.8 S. Fiorano (IT) – Nave (IT) – Gorlago (IT) line

3.9 Venezia Nord (IT) – Cordignano (IT) line

3.9 Venezia Nord (IT) – Cordignano (IT) line

3.10 Redipuglia (IT) – Udine Ovest (IT) line

3.10 Redipuglia (IT) – Udine Ovest (IT) line

3.11 New connections on the East –West axis of Italy

3.11 New connections on the east-west axis of Italy

3.12 Tavarnuzze IT) – Casellina (IT) line

3.12 Tavarnuzze (IT) – Casellina (IT) line

3.13 Tavarnuzze IT) – S. Barbara (IT) line

3.13 Tavarnuzze (IT) – S. Barbara (IT) line

3.14 Rizziconi IT) – Feroleto (IT) – Laino (IT) line

3.14 Rizziconi (IT) – Feroleto (IT) – Laino (IT) line

3.15 New connections on the North–South axis Italy

3.15 New connections on the north-south axis Italy

3.16 Network modifications for facilitating renewables connections in Italy

3.16 Network modifications for facilitating renewables connections in Italy

3.17 New wind energy connections in Italy

3.17 New wind energy connections in Italy

3.18 New connections in the North axis of Spain

3.18 New connections on the north axis of Spain

3.19 New connections in the Mediterranean axis of Spain

3.19 New connections in the Mediterranean axis of Spain

3.20 New connections in the Galicia (ES) – Centro (ES) axis

3.20 New connections on the Galicia (ES) – Centro (ES) axis

3.21 New connections in the Centro (ES) – Aragón (ES) axis

3.21 New connections on the Centro (ES) – Aragón (ES) axis

3.22 New connections in the Aragón (ES) – Levante (ES) axis

3.22 New connections on the Aragón (ES) – Levante (ES) axis

 

3.22a New connections on the Spanish south-centre axis (ES)

 

3.22b New connections on the Spanish east-centre axis (ES)

3.23 New connections in Andalucía (ES)

3.23 New connections in Andalucía (ES)

3.24 Pedralva (PT) – Riba d’Ave (PT) line and Pedralva facilities

3.24 Pedralva (PT) – Riba d’Ave (PT) line and Pedralva facilities

3.25 Recarei (PT) – Valdigem (PT) line

3.25 Recarei (PT) – Valdigem (PT) line

3.26 Picote (PT) – Pocinho (PT) line (upgrading)

3.26 Picote (PT) – Pocinho (PT) line (upgrading)

3.27 Modification of the current Pego (PT) – Cedillo (ES)/Falagueira (PT) line and Falagueira facilities

3.27 Modification of the current Pego (PT) – Cedillo (ES)/Falagueira (PT) line and Falagueira facilities

3.28 Pego (PT) – Batalha (PT) line and Batalha facilities

3.28 Pego (PT) – Batalha (PT) line and Batalha facilities

3.29 Sines (PT) – Ferreira do Alentejo (PT) I line (upgrading)

3.29 Sines (PT) – Ferreira do Alentejo (PT) I line (upgrading)

3.30 New wind energy connections in Portugal

3.30 New wind energy connections in Portugal

3.31 Pereiros (PT) – Zêzere (PT) – Santarém (PT) lines and Zêzere facilities

3.31 Pereiros (PT) – Zêzere (PT) – Santarém (PT) lines and Zêzere facilities

3.32 Batalha (PT) – Rio Maior (PT) I and II lines (upgradings)

3.32 Batalha (PT) – Rio Maior (PT) I and II lines (upgradings)

3.33 Carrapatelo (PT) – Mourisca (PT) line (upgrading)

3.33 Carrapatelo (PT) – Mourisca (PT) line (upgrading)

3.34 Valdigem (PT) – Viseu (PT) – Anadia (PT) line

3.34 Valdigem (PT) – Viseu (PT) – Anadia (PT) line

3.35 Deviation of the current Rio Maior (PT) – Palmela (PT) line to Ribatejo (PT) and Ribatejo facilities

3.35 Deviation of the current Rio Maior (PT) – Palmela (PT) line to Ribatejo (PT) and Ribatejo facilities

3.36 Thessaloniki (GR), Lamia (GR) and Patras (GR) substations and connecting lines

3.36 Thessaloniki (EL), Lamia (EL) and Patras (EL) substations and connecting lines

3.37 Connections of the regions of Evia (GR), Lakonia (GR) and Thrace (GR)

3.37 Connections of the regions of Evia (EL), Lakonia (EL) and Thrace (EL)

3.38 Strengthening of existing connections of peripheral regions in the mainland in Greece

3.38 Strengthening of existing connections of peripheral regions in the mainland in Greece

3.39 Tynagh (IE) – Cashla (IE) line

3.39 Tynagh (IE) – Cashla (IE) line

3.40 Flagford (IE) – East Sligo (IE) line

3.40 Flagford (IE) – East Sligo (IE) line

3.41 Connections in the North–East and West of Spain, in particular to connect to the network wind-power generation capacities

3.41 Connections in the North-East and West of Spain, in particular to connect to the network wind-power generation capacities

3.42 Connections in the Basque country (ES), Aragón (ES) and Navarra (ES)

3.42 Connections in the Basque country (ES), Aragón (ES) and Navarra (ES)

3.43 Connections in Galicia (ES)

3.43 Connections in Galicia (ES)

3.44 Connections in Central Sweden

3.44 Connections in central Sweden

3.45 Connections in Southern Sweden

3.45 Connections in southern Sweden

 

3.45a Hamburg (DE) – Schwerin region (DE) line

 

3.45b Halle/Saale region (DE) – Schwerin region (DE) line

 

3.45c New wind energy connections off-and onshore in Germany

 

3.45d Upgrading of 380 kV grid in Germany for connection of offshore windmill parks

3.46 Lübeck/Siems (DE) – Görries (DE) line

 

3.47 Lübeck/Siems (DE) – Krümmel line

 

3.48 Connections in Northern Ireland, in relation to the interconnections with Ireland

3.48 Connections in Northern Ireland, in relation to the interconnections with Ireland

3.49 Connections in the North West of United Kingdom

3.49 Connections in the North-West of United Kingdom

3.50 Connections in Scotland and England, with a view to the greater use of renewable sources in electricity generation

3.50 Connections in Scotland and England, with a view to the greater use of renewable sources in electricity generation

3.51 New offshore wind energy connections in Belgium

3.51 New offshore wind energy connections in Belgium, including upgrade of 380 kv grid

3.52 Borssele substation (NL)

3.52 Borssele substation (NL)

3.53 Implementation of reactive power compensation agreement (NL)

3.53 Implementation of reactive power compensation agreement (NL)

 

3.53a Installation of phase shifters and/or capacitor batteries in Belgium

 

3.53b Upgrading of 380 kV grid in Belgium to increase import capacity

3.54 St. Peter (AT) – Tauern line

3.54 St. Peter (AT) – Tauern line

3.55 Südburgenland (AT) – Kainachtal (AT) line

3.55 Süd-Burgenland (AT) – Kainachtal (AT) line

 

3.56 Dunowo (PL) – Zydowo (PL) – Krzewina (PL) – Plewiska (PL)

 

3.57 Patnow (PL) – Grudziadz (PL)

 

3.58 Ostrow (PL) – Plewiska (PL)

 

3.59 Ostrow (PL) – Trebaczew (Rogowiec) (PL)

 

3.60 Plewiska (PL) – Patnow (PL)

 

3.61 Tarnow (PL) – Krosno (PL)

 

3.62 Elk (PL) – Olsztyn Matki (PL)

 

3.63 Elk (PL) – Narew (PL)

 

3.64 Mikulowa (PL) – Swiebodzice-Dobrzen (Groszowice) (PL)

 

3.65 Patnow (PL) – Sochaczew (PL) – Warsaw (PL)

 

3.66 Krsko (SI) – Bericevo (SI)

 

3.67 Upgrade of Slovene transmission system from 220 kV to 400 kV

 

3.68 Medzibrod (SK) – Liptovska Mara (SK)

 

3.69 Lemesany (SK) – Moldava (SK)

 

3.70 Lemesany (SK) – Velke Kapusany (SK)

 

3.71 Gabcikovo (SK) – Velky Dur (SK)

 

3.72 Connections in northern Sweden

 

3.73 Transferring Saaremaa supply to 110 kV

 

3.74 Improving Tartu power supply

 

3.75 Renovation of Eesti substation (300 kV)

 

3.76 Renovation of Kiisa, Puessi, and Viljandi substations (110kV)

 

3.77 Nosovice (CZ) – Prosenice (CZ): rebuilding of 400 kV single line as 400 kV double-circuit line

 

3.78 Krasikov (CZ) – Horni Zivotice (CZ): new 400 kV single line

 

3.79 New wind energy connections in Malta (MT)

4 Developing electricity connections with the non-member States

4 Developing electricity connections with the non-member states

4.1 Neuenhagen (DE) – Vierraden (DE) – Krajnik (PL) line

 

4.2 Brunsbüttel (DE) – Southern Norway link

 

4.3 S. Fiorano (IT) – Robbia (CH) line

 

4.4 New interconnection Italy – Switzerland

4.4 New interconnection Italy – Switzerland

4.5 Philippi (GR) – Maritsa 3 (Bulgaria) line

4.5 Philippi (EL) – Maritsa 3 (Bulgaria) line

4.6 Amintaio (GR) — Bitola (FYROM) line

4.6 Amintaio (EL)— Bitola (FYROM) line

4.7 Kardia (GR) – Elbasan (Albania) line

4.7 Kardia (EL) – Elbasan (Albania) line

4.8 Elbasan (Albania) – Podgorica (Serbia and Montenegro) line

4.8 Elbasan (Albania) – Podgorica (Serbia and Montenegro) line

4.9 Mostar (Bosnia–Herzegovina) substation and connecting lines

4.9 Mostar (Bosnia-Herzegovina) substation and connecting lines

4.10 Ernestinovo (Croatia) substation and connecting lines

4.10 Ernestinovo (Croatia) substation and connecting lines

4.11 New connections between Greece and Albania, Bulgaria and FYROM

4.11 New connections between Greece and Albania, Bulgaria and FYROM

4.12 Philippi (GR) – Hamidabad (TR) line

4.12 Philippi (EL) – Hamidabad (TR) line

4.13 Submarine cable between the north –east/east England and southern Norway

4.13 Submarine cable between north –east/east England and southern Norway

4.14 Eemshaven (NL) – Feda (NO) link

4.12 Eemshaven (NL) – Feda (NO) link

4.15 Submarine cable between South Spain and Morocco (strengthening of existing connection)

4.15 Submarine cable between south Spain and Morocco (strengthening of existing connection)

4.16 Connections for the Baltic Electricity Ring: Germany – Poland – Russia – Estonia – Latvia – Lithuania – Sweden –Finland – Denmark – Belarus

4.16 Connections for the Baltic Electricity Ring: Germany – Poland – Russia – Estonia – Latvia – Lithuania – Sweden –Finland – Denmark – Belarus

4.17 Southern Finland – Russia links

4.17 Southern Finland – Russia links

4.18 Germany – Poland – Lithuania – Belarus – Russia link (East–West High Power Link)

 

4.19 Poland – Lithuania link

 

4.20 Submarine cable between Finland and Estonia

 

4.21 New connections between North Sweden and North Norway

4.21 New connections between north Sweden and north Norway

4.22 New connections between Mid Sweden and Mid Norway

4.22 New connections between mid- Sweden and mid-Norway

4.23 Borgvik (SE) – Hoesle (NO) – Oslo region (NO) line

4.23 Borgvik (SE) – Hoesle (NO) – Oslo region (NO) line

4.24 New connections between the UCTE and CENTREL systems

 

4.25 New connections between the UCTE/CENTREL system and the Balkan countries

4.25 New connections between the UCTE/CENTREL system and the Balkan countries

4.26 Connections and interface between the extended UCTE system and Belarus, Russia and Ukraine, including relocation of HVDC conversion stations operating previously between Austria and Hungary, Austria and the Czech Republic, and Germany and the Czech Republic

4.26 Connections and interface between the extended UCTE system and Belarus, Russia and Ukraine, including relocation of HVDC conversion stations operating previously between Austria and Hungary, Austria and the Czech Republic, and Germany and the Czech Republic

4.27 Connections in the Black Sea Electricity Ring: Russia – Ukraine – Romania – Bulgaria –Turkey – Georgia

4.27 Connections in the Black Sea Electricity Ring: Russia – Ukraine – Romania – Bulgaria –Turkey – Georgia

4.28 New connections in the Black Sea area with a view to interoperability of the extended UCTE system with the networks in the countries concerned

4.28 New connections in the Black Sea area with a view to interoperability of the extended UCTE system with the networks in the countries covered

4.29 New connections in the Mediterranean Electricity Ring: France – Spain – Morocco – Algeria – Tunisia –Libya – Egypt – Near–Eastern Countries – Turkey – Greece – Italy

4.29 New connections in the Mediterranean Electricity Ring: France – Spain – Morocco – Algeria – Tunisia –Libya – Egypt – Near Eastern countries – Turkey – Greece – Italy

4.30 Submarine cable between South Spain and North–West Algeria

4.30 Submarine cable between south Spain and north-west Algeria

4.31 Submarine cable between Italy and Algeria

4.31 Submarine cable between Italy and North Africa (Algeria, Tunisia, Libya)

 

4.31a Electricity connection between Tunisia and Italy

4.32 New connections in the Barents Region/Area

4.32 New connections in the Barents region/area

 

4.32a Upgrading of connections between Denmark and Norway

 

4.32b Obermoorweiler (DE) – Meiningen (AT) – Bonaduz (CH): further capacity increase

 

4.32c Bekescsaba (HU) – Oradea (RO)

 

4.32d Pecs (HU) – Sombor (YU)

 

4.32e Pecs (HU) – Ernestinovo (HR)

 

4.32f Velke Kapusany (SK) – UA border

 

4.32g Andrall (ES) – Encamp (AND): capacity increase to 220 kV

 

4.32h Spain – Andorra –France: upgrade of connections

4.33 Installation of flexible alternative current transmission systems between Italy and Slovenia

 

4.34 New interconnection Italia – Slovenia

 

4.35 Submarine cable Italy and Croatia

 

4.36 Reinforcement of connections between Denmark and Norway

 

5 Actions improving the functioning of the interconnected electricity networks within the internal market

5 Actions improving the functioning of the interconnected electricity networks within the internal market

(No specifications defined yet)

(No specifications defined yet)

Justification

The purpose of this amendment is to update the list of projects in the light of proceedings in the Council. The update has been agreed by both the Commission and the Member States.

The reference to the ‘S. Fiorano (IT) – Robbia (CH) line’ has been deleted because the project has already been implemented.

Amendment 29

Annex III, Gas networks

6 Introducing natural gas into new regions

6 Introducing natural gas into new regions

6.1 Developing gas network from Belfast towards the North–West region of Northern Ireland (UK) and, if appropriate, to the western coast of Ireland

6.1 Developing gas network from Belfast towards the north-west region of Northern Ireland (UK) and, if appropriate, to the western coast of Ireland

6.2 LNG in Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Canary Islands (ES)

6.2 LNG in Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Canary Islands (ES)

6.3 LNG in Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (ES)

6.3 LNG in Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (ES)

6.4 LNG in Madeira (PT)

6.4 LNG in Madeira (PT)

6.5 Development of gas network in Sweden

6.5 Development of gas network in Sweden

6.6 Connection between the Balearic Islands (ES) and the mainland Spain

6.6 Connection between the Balearic Islands (ES) and mainland Spain

6.7 High pressure branch to Thrace (GR)

6.7 High-pressure branch to Thrace (EL)

6.8 High pressure branch to Corinth (GR)

6.8 High-pressure branch to Corinth (EL)

6.9 High pressure branch to North–West Greece (GR)

6.9 High-pressure branch to north-west Greece (EL)

6.10 Connection of Lolland (DK) and Falster (DK) islands

6.10 Connection of Lolland (DK) and Falster (DK) islands

 

6.11 LNG on the island of Cyprus, Vasilikos Energy Centre

 

6.12 Connection of Vasilikos (CY) LNG plant and Moni (CY) power station

 

6.13 LNG on the island of Crete (EL)

 

6.14 High-pressure branch to Patra (EL)

 

6.15 LNG in Malta

7 Developing gas connections in order to meet the needs of the internal market or strengthening of the security of supply, including connection of separate natural gas networks

7 Developing gas connections in order to meet the needs of the internal market or strengthening of the security of supply, including connection of separate natural gas networks

7.1 Additional gas interconnection pipeline between Ireland and Scotland

7.1 Additional gas interconnection pipeline between Ireland and Scotland

7.2 North–South interconnection, including Dublin – Belfast pipeline

7.2 North–South interconnection, including Dublin – Belfast pipeline

7.3 Compression station on the Lacq (FR) – Calahorra (ES) pipeline

7.3 Compression station on the Lacq (FR) – Calahorra (ES) pipeline

7.4 Lussagnet (FR) – Bilbao (ES) pipeline

7.4 Lussagnet (FR) – Bilbao (ES) pipeline

7.5 Perpignan (FR) – Barcelona (ES) pipeline

7.5 Perpignan (FR) – Barcelona (ES) pipeline

7.6 Increasing transport capacity of gas pipelines supplying Portugal through South Spain and Galicia and Asturias through Portugal

7.6 Increasing transport capacity of gas pipelines supplying Portugal through south Spain and Galicia and Asturias through Portugal

7.7 Puchkirchen (AT) – Burghausen (DE) pipeline

7.7 Puchkirchen (AT) – Burghausen (DE) pipeline

7.8 Andorf (AT) – Simbach (DE) pipeline

7.8 Andorf (AT) – Simbach (DE) pipeline

7.9 Wiener Neustadt (AT) – Sopron (HU) pipeline

7.9 Wiener Neustadt (AT) – Sopron (HU) pipeline

7.10 Bad Leonfelden (AT) – Linz (AT) pipeline

7.10 Bad Leonfelden (AT) – Linz (AT) pipeline

7.11 North–West Greece – Elbasan (AL) pipeline

7.11 North-west Greece – Elbasan (AL) pipeline

7.12 Greece – Italy interconnection pipeline

7.12 Greece – Italy interconnection pipeline

7.13 Compression station on the main pipeline in Greece

7.13 Compression station on the main pipeline in Greece

7.14 Connection between the networks of Austria and Czech Republic

7.14 Connection between the networks of Austria and Czech Republic

7.15 Gas transport corridor in South–East Europe across Greece, FYROM, Serbia and Montenegro, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Slovenia and Austria

7.15 Gas transport corridor in South-East Europe across Greece, FYROM, Serbia and Montenegro, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Slovenia and Austria

7.16 Gas transport corridor between Austria and Turkey through Hungary, Romania and Bulgaria

7.16 Gas transport corridor between Austria and Turkey through Hungary, Romania and Bulgaria

7.17 Interconnecting pipelines between United Kingdom, the Netherlands and Germany, linking the main sources and markets of North–West Europe

7.17 Interconnecting pipelines between United Kingdom, the Netherlands and Germany, linking the main sources and markets of north-west Europe

7.18 Connection between North-East Germany (Berlin area) and North-West Poland (Szczecin area) with a branch from Schmölln to Lubmin (DE, Greifswald area)

7.18 Connection between north-east Germany (Berlin area) and north-west Poland (Szczecin area), with a branch from Schmölln to Lubmin (DE, Greifswald area)

 

7.18a Cieszyn (PL) – Ostrava (CZ) pipeline

 

7.18b Görlitz (DE) – Zgorzelec (PL): extension and interconnection of natural gas networks

 

7.18c Bernau (DE) – Szczecin (PL) extension

7.19 Connection between offshore facilities in the North Sea, or from Danish offshore to United Kingdom onshore facilities

7.19 Connection between offshore facilities in the North Sea, or from Danish offshore to United Kingdom onshore facilities

7.20 Reinforcement of the capacity of transport between France and Italy

7.20 Reinforcement of the capacity of transport between France and Italy

7.21 The Baltic gas interconnector between Denmark – Germany – Sweden

7.21 The Baltic gas interconnector between Denmark – Germany – Sweden

 

7.22 Winksele (BE) blending station on north-south axis

 

7.23 Zeebrugge (BE) – Eynatten (BE) capacity upgrade

 

7.24 Upgrading of capacity along north-west axis: Zelzate (BE) – Zeebrugge (BE)

 

7.25 Building of gas pipeline linking Denmark and the Netherlands and connecting existing North Sea production facilities

8 Developing capacities for receiving liquefied natural gas (LNG) and for storage of natural gas

8 Developing capacities for receiving liquefied natural gas (LNG) and for storage of natural gas

8.1 LNG at Le Verdon-sur-mer (FR, new terminal) and pipeline to Lussagnet (FR) storage

8.1 LNG at Le Verdon-sur-mer (FR, new terminal) and pipeline to Lussagnet (FR) storage

8.2 LNG at Fos-sur-mer (FR)

8.2 LNG at Fos-sur-mer (FR)

8.3 LNG at Huelva (ES), extending existing terminal

8.3 LNG at Huelva (ES), extending existing terminal

8.4 LNG at Cartagena (ES), extending existing terminal

8.4 LNG at Cartagena (ES), extending existing terminal

8.5 LNG at Galicia (ES), new terminal

8.5 LNG at Galicia (ES), new terminal

8.6 LNG at Bilbao (ES), new terminal

8.6 LNG at Bilbao (ES), new terminal

8.7 LNG in the Valencia Region (ES), new terminal

8.7 LNG in the Valencia region (ES), new terminal

8.8 LNG in Barcelona (ES), extending existing terminal

8.8 LNG in Barcelona (ES), extending existing terminal

8.9 LNG in Sines (PT), new terminal

8.9 LNG in Sines (PT), new terminal

8.10 LNG at Revithoussa (GR), extending existing terminal

8.10 LNG at Revithoussa (EL), extending existing terminal

8.11 LNG on the North Adriatic Coast (IT)

8.11 LNG on the North Adriatic coast (IT)

8.12 LNG offshore in the North Adriatic Sea (IT)

8.12 LNG offshore in the North Adriatic Sea (IT)

8.13 LNG on the South Adriatic Coast (IT)

8.13 LNG on the South Adriatic coast (IT)

8.14 LNG on the Ionian Coast (IT)

8.14 LNG on the Ionian coast (IT)

8.15 LNG on the Tyrrenian Coast (IT)

8.15 LNG on the Tyrrenian coast (IT)

8.16 LNG on the Ligurian Coast (IT)

8.16 LNG on the Ligurian coast (IT)

8.17 LNG at Zeebrugge/Dudzele (BE, extending existing terminal)

8.17 LNG at Zeebrugge/Dudzele (BE, second phase of capacity extension)

8.18 LNG at Isle of Grain, Kent (UK)

8.18 LNG at Isle of Grain, Kent (UK)

8.19 Construction of a second LNG terminal in Greece

8.19 Construction of a second LNG terminal in mainland Greece

8.20 Developing underground gas storage facilities in Ireland

8.20 Developing underground gas storage facilities in Ireland

8.21 Storage at South Kavala (GR), conversion of an offshore depleted gas field

8.21 Storage at South Kavala (EL), conversion of an offshore depleted gas field

8.22 Storage at Lussagnet (FR, extending existing site)

8.22 Storage at Lussagnet (FR, extending existing site)

8.23 Storage at Pecorade (FR, conversion of a depleted oil field)

8.23 Storage at Pecorade (FR, conversion of a depleted oil field)

8.24 Storage in Alsace region (FR, developing of saline cavities)

8.24 Storage in Alsace region (FR, developing of saline cavities)

8.25 Storage in Centre region (FR, developing water table).

8.25 Storage in Centre region (FR, developing water table)

8.26 Storage on the North–South axis of Spain (new sites) in Cantabria, Aragon, Castilla y León, Castilla – La Mancha and Andalucia

8.26 Storage on the north-south axis of Spain (new sites) in Cantabria, Aragon, Castilla y León, Castilla – La Mancha and Andalucia

8.27 Storage on the Mediterranean axis of Spain (new sites) in Catalonia, Valencia and Murcia

8.27 Storage on the Mediterranean axis of Spain (new sites) in Catalonia, Valencia and Murcia

8.28 Storage in Carriço (PT, new site)

8.28 Storage in Carriço (PT, new site)

8.29 Storage at Loenhout (BE, extending existing site)

8.29 Storage at Loenhout (BE, extending existing site)

8.30 Storage at Stenlille (DK) and Lille Torup (DK, extending existing site)

8.30 Storage at Stenlille (DK) and Lille Torup (DK, extending existing site)

8.31 Storage at Tønder (DK, new site)

8.31 Storage at Tønder (DK, new site)

8.32 Storage at Puchkirchen (AT, extending existing site), including pipeline to the Penta West system near Andorf (AT)

8.32 Storage at Puchkirchen (AT, extending existing site), including pipeline to the Penta West system near Andorf (AT)

8.33 Storage at Baumgarten (AT, new site)

8.33 Storage at Baumgarten (AT, new site)

8.34 Storage at Haidach (AT, new site), including pipeline to the European gas grid

8.34 Storage at Haidach (AT, new site), including pipeline to the European gas grid

8.35 Developing underground gas storage facilities in Italy

8.35 Developing underground gas storage facilities in Italy

 

8.36 Storage at Wierzchowice (PL, extending existing site)

 

8.37 Storage at Kossakowo (PL, developing underground storage)

 

8.38 Malta (MT) – Sicily (IT) gas pipeline

 

8.39 Storage in Lithuania (new site)

9 Developing gas transport capacity (gas supply pipelines)

9 Developing gas transport capacity (gas supply pipelines)

9.1 Creation and development of connections Nordic Gas Grid: Norway – Denmark – Germany – Sweden – Finland – Russia – Baltic States – Poland

9.1 Creation and development of connections Nordic Gas Grid: Norway – Denmark – Germany – Sweden – Finland – Russia – Baltic States – Poland

9.2 The Mid–Nordic gas pipeline: Norway, Sweden, Finland

9.2 The Mid-Nordic gas pipeline: Norway, Sweden, Finland

9.3 The North European gas pipeline: Russia, Baltic Sea, Germany

9.3 The North European gas pipeline: Russia, Baltic Sea, Germany

9.4 Gas pipeline from Russia to Germany, via Latvia, Lithuania and Poland, including developing underground gas storage facilities in Latvia

9.4 Gas pipeline from Russia to Germany, via Latvia, Lithuania and Poland, including developing underground gas storage facilities in Latvia (‘Amber’ project)

9.5 Gas pipeline Finland–Estonia

9.5 Gas pipeline Finland–Estonia

9.6 New gas pipelines from Algeria to Spain and France and related capacity increase of the internal networks in these countries

9.6 New gas pipelines from Algeria to Spain and France and related capacity increase of the internal networks in these countries

9.7 Increasing transport capacity of the Algeria – Morocco – Spain (up to Córdoba) pipeline

9.7 Increasing transport capacity of the Algeria – Morocco – Spain (up to Córdoba) pipeline

9.8 Córdoba (ES) – Ciudad Real (ES) pipeline

9.8 Córdoba (ES) – Ciudad Real (ES) pipeline

9.9 Ciudad Real (ES) – Madrid (ES) pipeline

9.9 Ciudad Real (ES) – Madrid (ES) pipeline

9.10 Ciudad Real (ES) – Mediterranean coast (ES) pipeline

9.10 Ciudad Real (ES) – Mediterranean coast (ES) pipeline

9.11 Branches in Castilla (ES) – La Mancha (ES)

9.11 Branches in Castilla (ES) – La Mancha (ES)

9.12 Extension towards North–West Spain

9.12 Extension towards north-west Spain

9.13 Algeria – Spain submarine pipeline and pipelines for the connection to France

9.13 Algeria – Spain submarine pipeline and pipelines for the connection to France

9.14 Increasing transport capacity from Russian resources to the European Union, via Ukraine, Slovakia and the Czech Republic

9.14 Increasing transport capacity from Russian resources to the European Union, via Ukraine, Slovakia and the Czech Republic

9.15 Increasing transport capacity from Russian resources to the European Union, via Belarus and Poland

9.15 Increasing transport capacity from Russian resources to the European Union, via Belarus and Poland

 

9.15a Yamal – Europe II natural gas pipeline

9.16 Yagal Sud gas pipeline (between the STEGAL pipeline leading to the DE, FR, CH triangle)

9.16 Yagal Sud gas pipeline (between the STEGAL pipeline leading to the DE, FR, CH triangle)

9.17 SUDAL East gas pipeline (between MIDAL pipeline near Heppenheim to Burghausen connection with the PENTA pipeline in Austria)

9.17 SUDAL East gas pipeline (between MIDAL pipeline near Heppenheim to Burghausen connection with the PENTA pipeline in Austria)

 

9.17a Increasing transport capacity of the STEGAL gas pipeline for transport of additional gas from the Czech-German border and from the Polish-German border through Germany to other Member States

9.18 Gas pipeline from Libyan resources to Italy

9.18 Gas pipeline from Libyan resources to Italy

9.19 Gas pipeline from resources in the Caspian Sea Countries to the European Union

9.19 Gas pipeline from resources in the Caspian Sea countries to the European Union

9.20 Greece – Turkey gas pipeline

9.20 Greece – Turkey gas pipeline

9.21 Increasing transport capacity from Russian resources to Greece and other Balkan countries, via Ukraine, Moldavia, Romania and Bulgaria

9.21 Increasing transport capacity from Russian resources to Greece and other Balkan countries, via Ukraine, Moldavia, Romania and Bulgaria

9.22 St. Zagora (BG) – Ihtiman (BG) gas pipeline

9.22 St. Zagora (BG) – Ihtiman (BG) gas pipeline

 

9.22a Trans-Adriatic pipeline – Natural gas pipeline to transport natural gas imported from the Caspian Sea region, Russia, or the Middle East, connecting Italy and the South-East European energy markets

9.23 Connecting pipelines between the German, Czech, Austrian and Italian gas networks

9.23 Connecting pipelines between the German, Czech, Austrian and Italian gas networks

9.24 Gas pipeline from Russian resources to Italy, via Ukraine, Slovakia, Hungary and Slovenia

9.24 Gas pipeline from Russian resources to Italy, via Ukraine, Slovakia, Hungary and Slovenia

9.25 Increasing transport capacity of the TENP gas pipeline running from the Netherlands through Germany to Italy

9.25 Increasing transport capacity of the TENP gas pipeline running from the Netherlands through Germany to Italy

9.26 Taisnieres (FR) – Oltingue (CH) gas pipeline

9.26 Taisnieres (FR) – Oltingue (CH) gas pipeline

9.27 Gas pipeline from Denmark to Poland, possibly via Sweden

9.27 Gas pipeline from Denmark to Poland, possibly via Sweden

9.28 Nybro (DK) – Dragør (DK) gas pipeline, including connecting pipeline to the storage at Stenlille (DK)

9.28 Nybro (DK) – Dragør (DK) gas pipeline, including connecting pipeline to the storage at Stenlille (DK)

9.29 Gas network from the Barents Sea resources to the European Union, via Sweden and Finland

9.29 Gas network from the Barents Sea resources to the European Union, via Sweden and Finland

9.30 Gas pipeline from the Corrib field (IE, offshore)

9.30 Gas pipeline from the Corrib field (IE, offshore)

9.31 Gas pipeline from Algerian resources to Italy, via Sardinia with a branch to Corsica

9.31 Gas pipeline from Algerian resources to Italy, via Sardinia, with a branch to Corsica

9.32 Gas network from resources in the Middle East to the European Union

9.32 Gas network from resources in the Middle East to the European Union

9.33 Gas pipeline from Norway to the United Kingdom

9.33 Gas pipeline from Norway to the United Kingdom

 

9.34 Pécs (HU) – Croatia connection

 

9.35 Szeged (HU) – Oradea (RO) connection

 

9.36 Vecses (HU) – Slovakia connection

 

9.37 Beregdaroc (HU) – Ukraine capacity increase

10 Actions improving the functioning of the interconnected gas networks within the internal market

10 Actions improving the functioning of the interconnected gas networks within the internal market

(No specifications defined yet)

(No specifications defined yet)

Justification

The purpose of this amendment is to update the list of projects in the light of proceedings in the Council. The update has been agreed by both the Commission and the Member States.

Amendment 30

Annex IV

 

This annex deleted

Justification

Consistent with Amendments 24 and 25.

(1)

Not yet published in OJ.


EXPLANATORY STATEMENT

1. Background and aims

The proposal for a decision on the guidelines for trans-European energy networks is one of four proposals making up a package adopted in December 2003; the other three proposals related to end uses and energy services, measures to guarantee security of supply, infrastructure investment, and conditions of access to gas transmission networks.

The Union is working step by step to establish a European gas and electricity market, which could eventually encompass more than 35 countries and a population of over 600 million. The Commission believes that this future market should be founded on common rules to open the market, protect the environment, and guarantee safety. The Council endorsed these guidelines in December 2003 in an outline document on energy infrastructure in the enlarged Europe, basing its approach on several European Council conclusions (more specifically those of the Copenhagen and Barcelona meetings, the latter having set the 10% target for interconnections between Member States).

As far as its neighbours are concerned, there are three ‘priority cooperation areas’ with which the Union is already pursuing organised cooperation in the energy sector: these are Russia (EU-Russia energy dialogue), the Euro-Mediterranean area (Euro-Mediterranean Energy Forum), and South-East Europe (the ‘Athens process’ aimed at setting up a subregional energy market). There are also three ‘complementary areas of common interest’, namely the Northern Dimension, the Caspian Sea countries, and other important partners, in particular Ukraine (not least because it is a country through which the EU’s oil and natural gas supplies pass in transit).

The proposal on the trans-European energy networks is intended to adapt the guidelines to the new shape of the Union resulting from the accession of ten new Member States, as well as to allow funding to be earmarked for projects of common interest in the enlarged Union, to enable the internal market in gas and electricity to be completed, and to guarantee security of supply by means of interconnections between Member States and with neighbouring countries (South-East Europe, Mediterranean countries, Ukraine, Belarus, etc.). A further aim is to speed up preparations for, and actual implementation of, projects and, lastly, to simplify the legislation to the extent that a single decision on the ‘TEN-e’ networks will replace the two hitherto in force.

2. The trans-European networks

2.1 The projects

The Commission has set out to update the networks so as to allow for enlargement; the resulting projects of common interest, over 160 focusing on electricity and 120 on gas, are listed in Annex III and defined according to the criteria in Annex II. These constitute the basis on which to implement trans-European projects in the energy sector.

The Commission has, however, introduced new concepts for the purpose of charting priorities for action, as reflected in priority projects on the priority axes and projects of European interest; secondly, it has provided the option of designating a European Coordinator (Article 10).

These new measures are essential in order to speed up project preparations and enable the lengthy authorisation procedures to be completed more smoothly.

2.2. Projects of European interest

The concept of projects of European interest amounts in reality to a selection of projects on the priority axes needed in order to interconnect the Member States. The projects in question, which must be compatible with sustainable development, have to have a decisive bearing on the operation of the competition-driven internal market and/or help to strengthen the Community’s security of supply. In order to be declared of European interest, they have to be of a cross-border nature or significantly affect cross-border transmission capacity. If they are submitted under a Community-funded programme (trans-European networks, Structural Funds, Cohesion Fund, etc.), the Member States must treat them as a priority.

2.3. The European Coordinator

The Commission may, if it so wishes, designate a European Coordinator to act on its behalf in a priority project or section thereof or in a set of linked projects.

The Coordinator will be called upon to give advice, encourage the use of common project assessment methods, report annually to the Commission, and foster communication among all the stakeholders involved in a project.

2.4. Proposals

The approach to the trans-European energy networks, as outlined above, is in line with the approach adopted to deal with the trans-European transport networks.

 Your rapporteur takes the same view as the Commission on projects of European interest and the European Coordinator. She therefore supports the text proposed, subject to the proviso that European coordinators should be designated, after consultation with the Member States concerned, only when projects are complex and particularly difficult to implement.

However, given the modest total funding to be allocated to the energy component of the trans-European networks and the fact that the necessary investment will, in the main, come from the private sector, no constraints should be imposed, because the Member States and industries that will shoulder the financial burden might perceive them as a way of ‘meddling’. That is why every reference to a transnational inquiry procedure, which does not exist at the present time, has been deleted from the proposal. That notwithstanding, bearing in mind that energy matters are important across the board, your rapporteur believes the proposal to be useful to the extent that it will encourage Member States to work together when necessary and, moreover, take the concept of European interest into account in their procedures for assessing projects, especially in terms of their decisive significance for security of supply and for the smooth running of the market. She also considers that national authorities should likewise base their assessments on socio-economic criteria.

 In the initial Commission text priority projects were arranged in a complex system of overlapping categories set out in three annexes.

- Annex III: projects of common interest,

- Annex I: priority projects on the priority axes,

- Annex IV: projects of European interest.

In the light of what she has learned about the proceeding in the Council, your rapporteur has taken the view that the approach advocated by the Council is more coherent and would serve to simplify the proposal. Projects of European interest are priority projects on the priority axes and can therefore be incorporated in Annex I. Annexes I and IV of the Commission’s proposed text have been combined. In addition to this recast, the list of projects in the three annexes has been updated. The update, proposed by the Council, has been approved by the Commission and the Member States. Because she considers them to be central to the aims described above, the rapporteur believes that the priority projects concerned should, without altering the Commission proposal, be termed projects of European interest.

The proposal for a decision thus classifies the projects according to a hierarchy. Projects of common interest, listed in Annex III and defined according to the criteria set out in Annex II, form the basis on which to implement trans-European projects. Priority projects on the priority axes, including projects of European interest, are listed in Annex I.

Your rapporteur has no objection to the update of the annexes proposed by the Council, in agreement with the Commission and the Member States, because she considers that the Commission provided a satisfactory justification for the choice of projects when it appeared before the ITRE Committee.

The projects of European interest listed in the new Annex I are shown on the two maps attached to this report.

 Your rapporteur also believes that the inclusion of olefins in the text is amply justified not only because the networks needed to transport them within European territory are important to European industry, but also because a reduction in road transport would benefit safety and the environment.

The fact that they are mentioned in Annex II means not only that olefin-related projects will be eligible for loans from the European Investment Bank, but also that they can be identified by a symbolic European label. It is important to stress, however, that a reference in this form does not make the projects eligible for funding under the heading of trans-European networks.

 The negotiations on the financial perspective ought to lead to an increase in the amount allocated to the trans-European energy networks, which should be raised from the present figure of approximately €20 m to at least €60 m, to be used primarily to finance feasibility studies.

 Your rapporteur believes in addition that it would be desirable to consider whether the trans-European energy networks might be incorporated into the ‘European corridors’ being proposed in the inland transport sector (roads, railways, etc.).

3. Conclusions

The draft decision marks an important step forward in that it will provide the enlarged Europe with a kind of master plan for the construction of gas pipelines and electricity interconnections over the next few years.

The opportunities for consultation with local stakeholders and the scope afforded to Member States to employ coordination procedures will make the projects more transparent and predictable, and will serve to highlight their key role in guaranteeing security of supply for European citizens where energy is concerned under more favourable conditions from the point ofview of economic development and the environment.

Several meetings have already been held with, among others, the shadow rapporteurs so as to enable everyone’s views to be taken into account. The Council has also been consulted in order to pave the way for an agreement as well as to identify the elements that will help to improve the text. Your rapporteur will keep you informed in the weeks ahead.

15.3.2005

OPINION OF THE COMMITTEE ON ECONOMIC AND MONETARY AFFAIRS

for the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy

on the proposal for a decision of the European Parliament and of the Council laying down guidelines for trans-European energy networks and repealing Decisions No 96/391/EC and No 1229/2003/EC

(COM(2003)0742 – C5-0064/2004 – 2003/0297(COD))

Draftsman: Guntars Krasts

SHORT JUSTIFICATION

With the accession of ten new Member States, it is necessary to adapt the trans-European network (TEN) guidelines so as to link the new Member States and thus enable them to participate in the internal market in electricity and gas. The purpose of the proposal for a decision is to increase the connections between the electricity supply systems of the EU Member States as separate network elements - both AC and DC. The main aims are to increase the security of the electricity supply in the individual Member States, regions and territories, and to increase the effectiveness of the competitive internal market, reducing the adverse impact of consolidation of electricity production enterprises. Construction of new infrastructure is necessary to ensure the future supply of gas to an enlarged European market. By attaining the aims of the decision, it will become possible not only to transmit energy over long distances, thus exploiting more effectively the various production patterns in the regions, but also to increase the amounts of energy traded, which could improve the position of consumers in the internal market.

The proposals made on behalf of the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs are based on the following considerations:

(a) The Trans-European Networks (TEN) constitute a small but significant element in national electricity and gas systems, whose operating principles are laid down in Directives 2003/54/EC and 2003/55/EC.

(b) The TEN decision must accord with the spirit and terminology of Directive 2003/54/EC.

(c) System operators are not participants in the market but only managers of the market's infrastructure and guarantors of security of supply on competitive electricity and gas markets in the individual Member States.

(d) By supervising conditions for access to and use of systems, national regulators must maintain a level playing field for market participants and ensure a return on assets for system operators as owners of networks (and also of the connections between them), so that systems operate adequately and safely.

(e) Creating interconnections in structured supplied systems is not always in the interest of the suppliers who dominate particular regions, which means that market principles must sometimes be replaced with long-term planning methods to guarantee security of supply for consumers, environmental protection and sustainability. This does not always yield an immediate benefit to consumers in the form of lower supply prices, as it is necessary to take account of increased costs of use of systems. But investment in the creation of interconnections should be viewed over the medium to long term.

(f)  Financial support from the EU for specific projects undoubtedly accelerates the acquisition of investment and increases the volume of trading in electricity.

(g) If system operators from more than one State invest in the establishment of an interconnection, the project's financing and the effective use of the interconnection on the basis of market principles require good coordination between the operators, regulators and State energy-policy-makers involved.

The justifications for the amendments tabled are as follows:

1.  If an interconnection element (TEN) has to be created in the interests of security of supply, overcoming an inadequacy of production capacity, it is not always possible to adhere to market principles, as the time when investment is obtained may not correspond to the objectives of participants in a competitive market.

2.  Creating network elements may be a public service obligation for system operators if it is not in the interests of participants in the electricity market to create new interconnections.

3.  The prioritisation process will be a competition among individual regions and Member States if network elements are created with EU financial support. It must be primarily performed by the Commission, albeit subject to supervision by Parliament in the course of the budgetary procedure.

4.  A regional coordinator will pool, in a professional manner, the interests of the various parties in the Member States involved in the creation of a given interconnection (operators, regulators, financial backers, interested market participants, consumers).

5.  Network elements form only part of supply systems, which are run by system operators.

6.  It would not be right to delude consumers with promises of immediate low prices.

7.  The Baltic States are isolated from the EU's internal market, and Lithuania's undertaking to close down its nuclear power station will create real threats to an adequate electricity supply.

8.  Projects of common interest do not only affect a single Member State's supply system (or territory).

9.  It is safer to transport oil by pipeline than by sea or road.

10. It is likely that such an inquiry and evaluation will have to be performed in more than two Member States.

11. It is not possible to promise rapid implementation, partly on account of the inquiry mentioned in the previous point. In order to concentrate professional expertise and reduce uncertainty if each Member State works in isolation to support a joint project, a regional coordinator would play a stabilising role and would represent the project more professionally in consultations with the European coordinator instituted by the Commission.

12. Follows on from Amendment 11.

13. The coordinators will decide all matters amongst themselves, including consultations and recommendations on financing and the operation of networks/systems.

14. Follows on from Amendment 11.

15. Follows on from Amendment 11.

16. The participants in the competitive market are producers, those responsible for marketing and consumers. The role of system operators is of a different kind and such terminology has already been used in Directives 2003/54/EC and 2003/55/EC.

AMENDMENTS

The Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs calls on the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following amendments in its report:

Text proposed by the Commission(1)  Amendments by Parliament

Amendment 1

Recital 4

(4) Energy infrastructure should be constructed and maintained so as to enable the internal energy market to operate efficiently, without detracting from strategic and, where appropriate, universal service criteria.

(4) Energy infrastructure should be constructed and maintained so as to enable the internal energy market to operate efficiently, without detracting from strategic and, where appropriate, universal service criteria and public service obligations.

Amendment 2

Recital 5

(5) The priorities for trans-European energy networks also stem from the growing importance of the trans-European energy networks for securing and diversifying the Community’s energy supplies, incorporating the energy networks of the acceding countries, and ensuring the coordinated operation of the energy networks in the Community and in neighbouring countries. Indeed neighbouring countries to the European Union play a vital role in the Union’s energy policy. They supply a major part of the EU’s requirements of natural gas, they are key partners for the transit of primary energy to the EU and they will progressively become important players in the Community’s internal gas and electricity markets.

(5) The priorities for trans-European energy networks also stem from the growing importance of the trans-European energy networks for securing and diversifying the Community’s energy supplies, incorporating the energy networks of the new Member States and acceding countries, and ensuring the coordinated operation of the energy networks in the Community and in neighbouring countries after consulting the Member States concerned. Indeed neighbouring countries to the European Union play a vital role in the Union’s energy policy. They supply a major part of the EU’s requirements of natural gas, they are key partners for the transit of primary energy to the EU and they will progressively become important players in the Community’s internal gas and electricity markets.

Justification

The incorporation of new Member States' energy networks into trans-European networks will facilitate the cohesion process in the enlarged EU. The development of alternative energy sources is also important in achieving technological progress in the EU's industry and will diversify energy supply sources.

Amendment 3

Recital 10

(10) A more favourable context for the development of trans-European energy networks should be created, mainly by providing stimulus for technical cooperation between the entities responsible for networks, by facilitating the implementation of authorization procedures applied for network projects in the Member States in order to reduce delays and by mobilizing as appropriate the Funds, instruments and financial programmes of the Community available for network projects.

(10) A more favourable context for the development of trans-European energy networks should be created, mainly by providing stimulus for technical cooperation between the entities responsible for the operation and regulation of electricity and gas systems, by facilitating the implementation of authorization procedures applied for network projects in the Member States in order to reduce delays and by mobilizing as appropriate the Funds, instruments and financial programmes of the Community available for network projects.

Amendment 4

Article 3, point (a)

(a) encouraging effective operation of the internal market in general and of the internal energy market in particular, while encouraging the rational and proportional production, transportation, distribution and utilisation of energy resources and the development and connection of renewable energy resources, so as to reduce the cost of energy to the consumer and contribute to the diversification of energy sources;

(a) encouraging effective operation and development of the internal market in general and of the internal energy market in particular, while encouraging the rational and proportional production, transportation, distribution and utilisation of energy resources and the development and connection of renewable energy resources, so as to reduce the cost of energy to the consumer and contribute to the diversification of energy sources;

Justification

The EU should put more efforts while planning and developing energy production. The use of non-fossil and renewable energy resources will have positive environmental impact.

Amendment 5

Article 3, point (c)

(c) reinforcing the security of energy supplies, in particular by strengthening relations with third countries in the energy sector in the interest of all parties concerned, in particular in the framework of the Energy Charter Treaty and cooperation agreements concluded by the Community.

(c) reinforcing the security of energy supplies by balancing energy supply sources in order to avoid dependency on a single supply source, in particular by setting out the arrangements for relations with third countries in the energy sector in the interest of all parties concerned, in particular in the framework of the Energy Charter Treaty and cooperation agreements concluded by the Community.

Justification

Dependence on a single energy supply source could impact on EU foreign policy and thus reduce the EU's role as a global partner.

Amendment 6

Article 4, paragraph 1, point (b a) (new)

 

(ba) ensuring connection transmission networks from the Baltic States to Central European and Nordic operational areas.

Amendment 7

Article 6, paragraph 1, subparagraph 2

The evaluation of the economic viability shall be based upon a cost-benefit analysis which shall take account of all costs and benefits, including those in the medium and/or long term, in connection with environmental aspects, security of supply and the contribution to economic and social cohesion. Projects of common interest which relate to the territory of a Member State shall require the approval of the Member State concerned.

The evaluation of the economic viability shall be based upon a cost-benefit analysis which shall take account of all costs and benefits, including those in the medium and/or long term, in connection with environmental aspects, security of supply and the contribution to economic and social cohesion. Projects of common interest which relate to the territory of one or more Member States shall require the approval of all Member States concerned.

Amendment 8

Article 7, paragraph 3, point (b a) (new)

 

(ba) they shall reduce environmental impact from maritime and road transport.

Amendment 9

Article 8, paragraph 9

9. If a project which is declared to be of European interest includes a cross-border section which is technically and financially indivisible, the two Member States concerned shall conduct a transnational enquiry with a view to evaluating the cross-border section and consulting the public prior to authorisation of the project.

9. If a project which is declared to be of European interest includes a cross-border section which is technically and financially indivisible, the Member States concerned shall conduct a transnational enquiry with a view to evaluating the cross-border section and consulting the public prior to authorisation of the project.

Amendment 10

Article 10, paragraph 6 a (new)

 

6a. The level of co-ordination shall be proportionate to the costs of the project to avoid unnecessary administrative burdens.

PROCEDURE

Title

Proposal for a decision of the European Parliament and of the Council decision laying down guidelines for trans-European energy networks and repealing Decisions No 96/391/EC and No 1229/2003/EC

References

COM(2003)0742 – C5-0064/2004 – 2003/0297(COD)

Committee responsible

ITRE

Committee asked for its opinion

Date announced in plenary

ECON

16.9.2004

Enhanced cooperation

No

Draftsman
  Date appointed

Guntars Krasts

13.9.2004

Discussed in committee

18.1.2005

1.2.2005

15.3.2005

 

 

Date suggestions adopted

15.3.2005

Result of final vote

for:

against:

abstentions:

29

2

11

Members present for the final vote

Zsolt László Becsey, Pervenche Berès, Pier Luigi Bersani, Udo Bullmann, Ieke van den Burg, Paolo Cirino Pomicino, Jonathan Evans, Elisa Ferreira, Jean-Paul Gauzès, Benoît Hamon, Gunnar Hökmark, Karsten Friedrich Hoppenstedt, Sophia in 't Veld, Othmar Karas, Piia-Noora Kauppi, Christoph Konrad, Guntars Krasts, Astrid Lulling, Hans-Peter Martin, Gay Mitchell, Cristobal Montoro Romero, John Purvis, Alexander Radwan, Bernhard Rapkay, Dariusz Rosati, Eoin Ryan, Antolín Sánchez Presedo, Manuel António dos Santos, Peter Skinner, Margarita Starkevičiūtė, Ivo Strejček, Sahra Wagenknecht, Graham Watson, Lars Wohlin

Substitutes present for the final vote

Jean-Marie Cavada, Jorgo Chatzimarkakis, Mia De Vits, Harald Ettl, Ján Hudacký, Werner Langen, Thomas Mann, Andreas Schwab

Substitutes under Rule 178(2) present for the final vote

 

17.3.2005

OPINION OF OF THE COMMITTEE ON THE ENVIRONMENT, PUBLIC HEALTH AND FOOD SAFETY

for the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy

on the proposal for a decision of the European Parliament and of the Council laying down guidelines for trans-European energy networks and repealing Decisions No 96/391/EC and No 1229/2003/EC

(COM(2003)0742 – C5-0064/2004 – 2003/0297(COD))

Draftsman: Claude Turmes

SHORT JUSTIFICATION

TEN-E: Shopping list or focus on sustainable energy system?

A) Common Interest or Christmas shopping list?

The annexes I to III of the proposed legislation are not selective, but rather include all possibilities for future needs rather than a serious attempt to rationalise investment with a strategic vision.

The reason for this "Christmas shopping list" (230 projects) is the actual selection method. Due to pressure from their national energy companies, EU governments have promoted their own projects. Furthermore, the Commission instead of establishing real criteria for selection is only making minor adjustments to the original Member States proposals.

This situation cannot be allowed to continue, instead more details of all the proposed projects must be provided, including: information on their cost; justification; long-term impact on the market and environmental impact. But we have also to question the fundamental logic of grid building.

B) More lines = More competitive EU energy markets?

The EU Commission has stated that each Member State should have an import/export capacity of 10% of its total installed capacity to facilitate increased competition and speed up liberalisation. However, there is no empirical evidence to suggest that achieving a 10% target will create any significant improvement in competition. For example the UK has only a 3% export capacity and yet has one of the most competitive electricity systems whereas countries like Italy with an import capacity of 25% have high electricity prices due to a non-functioning market.

Empirical data show that a competitive, well functioning electricity market results from a clear and defined market regulation (unbundling, strict market abuse control, favouring new entrance) rather than a requirement for an arbitrary level of import capacity.

Creating artificial (and EU sponsored interconnections) will not increase competition in the sector but is rather aid the development of oligopoly structures in the energy sector. Already, the largest eight utilities own 75% of the electricity generation market; furthermore they are also in control of the relevant interconnects and even more important the trading market.

C) More lines = more security?

A large section of the EU TEN-E budget is earmarked for additional power lines between Italy and its neighbouring countries. This ignores the causes and lessons of the biggest blackout of European recent history.

The Italian case is a clear example that extremely high interconnection capacities is not an insurance against security of supply. As clearly stated by D. Maillard, the highest civil servant in the French energy administration: "one could put forward […] that the Italian black-out can be traced to too many transborder inter-connections" (Energie Plus, 15.01.2004).

Experience shows that a secure energy supply does not require long distance electricity transport, rather the reverse as the creation of localised production significantly increases security of supply, reduces the impacts to the environment, creates more jobs and limits drastically the investment need for new grids. The use of distributed generation and in particular with renewable energy, as outlined by the International Energy Agency, will result in lower CO2 emissions from the sector than might otherwise have occurred.

One of the major reasons why Italy is so dependent on electricity imports is that in today’s distorted EU electricity market, there was little incentive to invest in new power production in Italy, as

- The allocation of import capacities is controlled on a non-market based system which is contrary to EU law (some Italian companies use the grid for free to import large quantities of electricity from France)

- EDF is exporting electricity at below production costs as acknowledged by the "Cour des Comptes", 01.02.2005.

- Dominant companies are obstructing new market entrance.

One of the hidden agenda of the TEN-E is to perpetuate the EDF dumping practices. In this respect, we question the priorities given to interconnectors between France and its neighbouring countries.

D) Real priorities for TEN-E

Each of the proposed projects of common interest must be assessed to ensure that they are necessary, have the support of the local populations, do not distort the market, allow the development of distributed generator and do not lead to a reduction in security of supply. Projects of European Interests that do not fulfil all these criteria must be rejected. Furthermore, in order to avoid market distortion and to ensure that funding is only allocated to environmentally and economically sustainable projects your rapporteur is suggesting to delete all the annexes until these criteria have been clearly developed and applied by the EU institutions.

D.1 Priority for gas TEN-E

A fluid and competitive gas market in Europe is a precondition for:

Ø a functioning electricity market, as most new entrance in the EU electricity market will be highly efficient gas power station

Ø a more decentralised system, including cogeneration, and thus more environmentally friendly and also more stable electricity system.

The combination of smaller, more flexible power stations and a better harmonisation of electricity markets in Europe (the latter will reduce the artificial short term flows which are due to the today market imperfections) will bring relief to the today congested electricity grid in Europe.

A well functioning gas market needs regulation on access to gas storage. Europe needs also to regularly improve its gas efficiency with long-term instruments such as quantitative commitment by distributors to reduce consumption. Only such measures will allow the EU to fulfil its commitment on Climate Change.

D.2 Priority for electricity TEN-E

The sole priority must be the integration of renewables in the network. Large-scale wind farms in the North Sea and other parts of Europe project must definitely and quickly be promoted under TEN-E.

AMENDMENTS

The Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety calls on the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following amendments in its report:

Text proposed by the Commission(2)

 

Amendments by Parliament

Amendment 1

Recital 4

(4) Energy infrastructure should be constructed and maintained so as to enable the internal energy market to operate efficiently, without detracting from strategic and, where appropriate, universal service criteria.

(4) Energy infrastructure should be constructed and maintained so as to enable the internal energy market to operate efficiently, with due regard to the procedures for consulting the people affected, without detracting from strategic and universal service criteria.

Justification

When new infrastructure is built and the arrangements for maintaining or enhancing it are laid down, the impact which these will have on the environment and the surrounding area must be taken into account and procedures for the prior notification and consultation of the general public in accordance with current Community rules must be followed.

Amendment 2

Recital 8

(8) Since the project specifications are liable to change, they are given indicatively. The Commission should therefore be empowered to update them. Since the project may have considerable political and economic implications, it is important to find the appropriate balance between legislative oversight and flexibility in determining projects that merit potential Community support.

(8) Since the project specifications are liable to change, they are given indicatively. The Commission should therefore be empowered to update them. Since the project may have considerable political, environmental and economic implications, it is important to find the appropriate balance between legislative oversight and flexibility in determining projects that merit potential Community support.

Justification

Building high voltage lines, high-pressure gas pipelines or storage facilities may have not only considerable political and economic implications but environmental ones as well.

Amendment by Roberto Musacchio

Amendment 3

Recital 10

(10) A more favourable context for the development of trans-European energy networks should be created, mainly by providing stimulus for technical cooperation between the entities responsible for networks, by facilitating the implementation of authorization procedures applied for network projects in the Member States in order to reduce delays and by mobilizing as appropriate the Funds, instruments and financial programmes of the Community available for network projects.

(10) A more favourable context for the development of trans-European energy networks should be created, mainly by developing alternative, decentralised energy sources and by providing stimulus for technical cooperation between the entities responsible for networks, by facilitating the implementation of authorization procedures applied for network projects in the Member States in order to reduce delays and by mobilizing as appropriate the Funds, instruments and financial programmes of the Community available for network projects, including those intended to produce energy from decentralised sources and renewable sources.

Or. it

Justification

Giving priority to investment which will promote the development of more decentralised networks and of energy sources which already exist in the geographical area concerned will enable technical cooperation amongst the various operators to be maximised and will result in lower environmental impact, whilst at the same time reducing the cost of excessively expensive interconnections.

Amendment 4

Recital 10 a (new)

 

(10a) Since the budget allocated to the trans-European energy networks is relatively modest and mainly intended to finance feasibility studies, it is the Community Structural Funds, financial programmes and instruments that will enable, if necessary, funding to be provided for such - in particular interregional - interconnection networks.

Amendment 5

Recital 9

(9) It should be possible for some priority projects, or sections of priority projects, or groups of priority projects to improve their preparation and implementation by creating a coordination team, in which the Community would take part, for the duration of the priority projects concerned. The Commission should, therefore, be empowered to designate a European coordinator for such project(s), to encourage cooperation with users and operators, and ensure that the necessary monitoring is carried out in order to keep the Community informed of progress.

deleted

Justification

Cross border co-operation has occurred in the past without the Commission saying it can occur.

Amendment 6

Recital 11

(11) The identification of projects of common interest, their specifications and priority projects should be without prejudice to the results of the environmental impact assessment of the projects and of the plans or programmes.

(11) The identification of projects of common interest, their specifications and priority projects should be without prejudice to the results of the necessary public consultation process and the environmental impact assessment of the projects and of the plans or programmes.

Justification

These heavy projects such as building high voltage grid lines must always be endorsed by local and regional citizens. There is no point to overrule the public consultation process.

Amendment 7

Article 2, point 2, introductory part

2) in gas networks (transporting natural gas or olefin gases), to:

2) in gas networks (transporting natural gas, biogas or olefin gases), to:

Justification

Union support for infrastructure would not be justified if operators could discriminate against the use of resources of Community origin and in favour of gas imported into the Union. This could be the case with the transport of biogas.

Amendment 8

Article 3, point (b)

(b) facilitating the development and reducing the isolation of the less-favoured and island regions of the Community, thereby helping to strengthen economic and social cohesion;

(b) facilitating the development and reducing the isolation of the less-favoured and island regions of the Community by encouraging in particular the development of local networks and resources, such as co-generation and renewable energy sources, thereby helping to strengthen economic and social cohesion in the area concerned and with other regions;

Justification

In outlying regions in particular, priority must be given to methods of energy production which are more compatible with the environment and with the sustainable development of the geographical area concerned, not least in terms of social cohesion and employment.

Amendment 9

Article 3, point (d)

(d) contributing to sustainable development and improving the protection of the environment, in particular by reducing the environmental risks associated to the transportation and transmission of energy.

(d) strengthening sustainable development and improving the protection of the environment, in particular in connection with cogeneration, energy efficiency, energy services and renewable energy sources and by reducing the social and environmental risks associated with the transportation and transmission of energy.

Justification

The Commission appears to be justifying the principle of the building of new infrastructure by reference to the protection of the environment and sustainable development. However, such heavy infrastructure in itself causes nuisance, and above all in principle skews competition between local, decentralised energy sources on the one hand and remote, centralised sources on the other in the latter's favour. Part of the benefits of decentralised energy sources (renewable or cogeneration) is precisely avoiding the building of transport and transmission or distribution infrastructure, whilst improving the stability and security of energy systems.

Amendment 10

Article 4, point 1, point (a)

(a) adapting and developing the energy networks in support of the operation of the internal energy market and, in particular, solving the problems of bottlenecks in particular transfrontier ones, congestion and missing links, and taking account of the needs arising from the functioning of the internal market for electricity and natural gas and the enlargement of the European Union;

(a) adapting and developing the energy networks in support of the operation of the internal energy market and, in particular, solving the problems of bottlenecks, in particular transfrontier ones, congestion and missing links, increasing renewable energy sources' share of the energy market and taking account of the needs arising from the functioning of the internal market for electricity and natural gas and the enlargement of the European Union;

Justification

Increasing renewable energy sources' share of the energy market is a key plank of a sustainable European energy policy, hence it too must be mentioned as a priority for Community action in respect of trans-European energy networks.

Amendment 11

Article 4, point 3, point (a)

(a) development of natural gas networks in order to meet the Community's natural gas consumption needs and to control its natural gas supply systems;

(a) development of gas networks in order to meet the Community's gas consumption needs and to control its gas supply systems;

Justification

Deletion of the word 'natural' for reasons of consistency with Article 2(2).

Amendment 12

Article 4, point 3, point (c)

(c) development and integration of olefin gases networks in order to meet the olefin gases consumption needs of the industries in the Community.

deleted

Justification

This is a particular case, which need not be covered by a specific article.

Amendment 13

Article 5, point (a)

(a) the identification of projects of common interest, including those which have priority;

(a) the identification of projects of common interest on the basis of the criteria established in accordance with Article 6;

Justification

The priority of a project is determined by the application of selection criteria, to be discussed and decided on by the European institutions, in particular the European Parliament. It is the application of such criteria which provides justification for EU support, not simply the fact that a name is placed on a list by the Commission or the Member States themselves.

Amendment 14

Article 6, paragraph 1, subparagraph 2

The evaluation of the economic viability shall be based upon a cost-benefit analysis which shall take account of all costs and benefits, including those in the medium and/or long term, in connection with environmental aspects, security of supply and the contribution to economic and social cohesion. Projects of common interest which relate to the territory of a Member State shall require the approval of the Member State concerned.

The evaluation of the economic viability shall be based upon a cost-benefit analysis which shall take account of all costs and benefits, including those in the medium and/or long term, in connection with all environmental externalities and other environmental aspects, security of supply and the contribution to economic and social cohesion. Projects of common interest which relate to the territory of a Member State shall require the approval of the Member State concerned.

Justification

The incorporation of all external costs relating to the environment must form an integral part of this assessment of economic viability.

Amendment 15

Article 7, paragraph 3, point (b) and (b a) (new)

(b) they shall strengthen security of supply in the Community.

(b) they shall strengthen security of supply in the Community and/or

 

(ba) they shall lead to an increase in the use of renewable energy sources, energy efficiency services or cogeneration.

Justification

For the rest, priority projects 'compatible with sustainable development' must be in keeping with other EU energy policies (renewable energy sources, cogeneration and/or energy services).

Amendment 16

Article 8

Article 8

deleted

Projects of European Interest

 

1. A selection of projects on the priority axes referred to in Article 7 which are of cross-border nature or which have significant impact on cross-border transmission capacity are declared to be of European Interest. Those projects are set out in Annex IV.

 

2. When submitting projects under the Cohesion Fund, in accordance with Article 10 of Council Regulation (EC) No 1164/94, the Member States shall give appropriate priority to the projects declared to be of European interest.

 

3. When submitting projects under the budget for the trans-European networks, in accordance with Article 10 of Council Regulation (EC) No 2236/95, the Member States shall give appropriate priority to the projects declared to be of European interest.

 

4. When submitting projects under the Structural Funds, in accordance with Council Regulation (EC) No 1260/1999, the Member States shall give appropriate priority to the projects declared to be of European interest.

 

5. The Commission shall ensure that the countries qualifying for the instrument for structural policies for pre-accession shall give appropriate priority, when submitting projects under Articles 2 and 7 of Council Regulation (EC) No 1267/1999, to the projects declared to be of European interest.

 

6. If there is a significant current or prospective delay in starting work on one of the projects declared to be of European interest, the Commission shall ask the Member States concerned to give the reasons for the delay within three months.

 

After receiving and examining the reply from the Member States concerned, the Commission may, with due regard to the principle of proportionality, decide to withdraw the declaration as a project of European interest.

 

7. Five years after the completion of a project declared to be of European interest or of one of the sections thereof, the Member States concerned shall carry out an assessment of its socio-economic impact and its impact on the environment, including its impact on trade between Member States, on territorial cohesion and on sustainable development.

 

Member States shall inform the Commission of the results of this assessment.

 

8. If a project is declared to be of European interest the Member States concerned shall carry out, for each section of the project in question as appropriate, coordinated evaluation and public consultation procedures prior to authorisation of the project.

 

9. If a project which is declared to be of European interest includes a cross-border section which is technically and financially indivisible, the two Member States concerned shall conduct a transnational enquiry with a view to evaluating the cross-border section and consulting the public prior to authorisation of the project.

 

10. The coordinated or transnational enquiry procedures referred to in paragraphs 8 and 9 shall apply without prejudice to the obligations imposed by the Community legislation on environmental protection, particularly on environmental impact assessment.

 

The Member States concerned shall inform the Commission when such coordinated or transnational enquiry procedures are launched and of the results.

 

Justification

Bypassing the necessary process of consultation and authorisation through local bodies and national government is unacceptable, since it goes against ratified commitments of the EU and its Member States such as the Aarhus protocol. Furthermore, choosing such a hypothetical list of infrastructure to the Commission, without co-decision nor consultation of regions, is even more unacceptable without a set of objective criteria.

Amendment 17

Article 9

Article 9

deleted

Implementation of Projects of European Interest

 

1. The projects of European Interest shall be rapidly implemented.

 

No later than 6 months after the entry into force of this Decision, Member States shall submit to the Commission a timetable for the completion of those projects including details of:

 

(a) the envisaged passage of the project through the planning approval process,

 

(b) the timetable for the feasibility and design phase,

 

(c)the construction of the project

 

(d) the entry into service of the project.

 

2. Member States shall provide annual reports to the Commission on the progress with projects referred to in paragraph 1.

 

Where progress is slower than in the timetable submitted to the Commission, Member States must submit a revised plan to the Commission.

 

3. Member States shall take appropriate measures to ensure that the authorisation procedure for projects of European Interest is efficient and does not include any unnecessary delays.

 

Justification

Though the text pays lip service to the due process of concertation with local bodies and decisions, Article 9-3 in particular reveals that the objective of the text is to weaken the democratic process. Article 9 would justify the imposition of infrastructure by Member States against the will of the public or the local bodies, and would give a “European” excuse to circumvent democratic process.

Amendment 18

Article 10

Article 10

deleted

European Coordinator

 

1. The Commission may designate, after consultation of the Member States concerned, a European Coordinator.

 

The Coordinator shall act in the name and on behalf of the Commission. The mission of the Coordinator shall cover a single priority project or a section of a priority project. If necessary, the mission of the European Coordinator may be extended to other related priority projects.

 

2. The European Coordinator shall be chosen on the basis of experience of the European institutions and knowledge of issues relating to the technical, financial, socio-economic and environmental evaluation of major projects.

 

3. The Decision designating the European Coordinator shall specify how the coordinator is to perform his tasks.

 

4. The European Coordinator shall:

 

(a) promote joint methods for the evaluation of projects; advise project promoters on the financial package for the projects; and give, if appropriate, an opinion on issues relating to the operation of networks;

 

(b) submit every year a report to the Commission regarding progress achieved in the implementation of the project(s) for which he has been designated, new regulatory or other developments which could affect the characteristics of the project(s) and any difficulties and obstacles which are likely to result in a significant delay;

 

(c) contribute to the dialogue with operators, users, regional and local authorities and representatives of civil society with a view to gaining fuller knowledge of demand for transmission services, of the constraints and of the service parameters required to optimise the use of the infrastructure concerned.

 

5. The Member States concerned shall cooperate with the European Coordinator and give the Coordinator the information required to carry out the tasks referred to in paragraph 4.

 

6. The Commission may request the opinion of the European Coordinator when examining applications for Community funding for projects or groups of projects for which he has been designated.

 

Justification

As proposed in the text, the European coordinator is created to accelerate the construction of infrastructure, and justify the by-passing of democratic processes. His mandate would be a facilitator of construction, and by itself would impede in the process of evaluating the costs and benefits of an infrastructure without prejudging the results of consultations. Thus one main motivation of the democratic process would be biased.

Amendment 19

Article 15, paragraph 2

In this report, attention shall be given to the implementation and progress made in the carrying out of priority projects, as well as the modalities of their financing, especially as regards the contribution of Community funding, which concern cross-border connections as mentioned in Annex II, points 1, 2 and 7.

In this report, attention shall be given to the implementation and progress made in the carrying out of priority projects and to their impact on the use of renewable energy sources, as well as the modalities of their financing, especially as regards the contribution of Community funding, which concern cross-border connections as mentioned in Annex II, points 1, 2 and 7.

Justification

The Commission report must also assess the direct and indirect effects on growth in renewable energy sources.

Amendment 20

Annex IV

Annex IV

TRANS–EUROPEAN ENERGY NETWORKS
Projects of European Interest as defined in Article 8

ELECTRICITY NETWORKS

· Moulaine (FR) – Aubange (BE) line

· Avelin (FR) – Avelgem (BE) line

· Lienz (AT) – Cordignano (IT) line

· Installation of flexible alternative current transmission systems between Italy and Slovenia

· Udine Ovest (IT) – Okroglo line (SI)

· S. Fiorano (IT) – Nave (IT) – Gorlago (IT) line

· Venezia Nord (IT) – Cordignano (IT) line

· St. Peter (AT) – Tauern (AT) line

· Südburgenland (AT) – Kainachtal (AT) line

· S. Fiorano (IT) – Robbia (CH) line

· Sentmenat (ES) – Bescanό (ES) – Baixas (FR) line

· Valdigem (PT) Douro Internacional (PT) – Aldeadávila (ES) line

· Philippi (GR) – Hamidabad (TR) line

· Submarine cable England (UK) and Netherlands

· Submarine cable Ireland – Wales (UK)

· Kasso (DK) – Hamburg (DE) line

· Poland – Lithuania link

· Submarine cable Finland – Estonia (Estlink)

· Kasso (DK) – Revsing (DK) – Tjele (DK) line

· V.Hassing (DK) – Trige (DK) line

· Submarine cable Skagerak 4 (DK) – (NO)

· Neuenhagen (DE) – Vierraden (DE) – Krajnik (PL) line

· New interconnection Germany – Poland

· Dürnrohr (AT) – Slavetice (CZ) line

GAS NETWORKS

· North Transgas pipeline

· Yamal Europe pipeline

· Medgas pipeline Algeria-Spain-France-Continental Europe

· Algeria – Tunisia – Italy pipeline

· Libya – Italy pipeline

· Turkey – Greece – Italy pipeline

· Turkey – Austria pipeline

 

deleted

Justification

Deleted to ensure consistency with the amendments to Articles 8 to 10.

PROCEDURE

Title

Proposal for a decision of the European Parliament and of the Council laying down guidelines for trans-European energy networks and repealing Decisions No 96/391/EC and No 1229/2003/EC

References

COM(2003)0742 – C5-0064/2004 – 2003/0297(COD)

Committee responsible

ITRE

Committee asked for its opinion
  Date announced in plenary

ENVI
16.9.2004

Enhanced cooperation

No

Draftsman
  Date appointed

Claude Turmes
1.9.2004

Discussed in committee

7.3.2005

 

 

 

 

Date amendments adopted

15.3.2005

Result of final vote

for:

against:

abstentions:

49

1

2

Members present for the final vote

Liam Aylward, Johannes Blokland, John Bowis, Frederika Brepoels, Martin Callanan, Dorette Corbey, Chris Davies, Avril Doyle, Mojca Drčar Murko, Edite Estrela, Anne Ferreira, Karl-Heinz Florenz, Norbert Glante, Françoise Grossetête, Cristina Gutiérrez-Cortines, Satu Hassi, Gyula Hegyi, Mary Honeyball, Marie Anne Isler Béguin, Caroline Jackson, Dan Jørgensen, Christa Klaß, Eija-Riitta Korhola, Peter Liese, Linda McAvan, Marios Matsakis, Roberto Musacchio, Riitta Myller, Miroslav Ouzký, Adriana Poli Bortone, Vittorio Prodi, Dagmar Roth-Behrendt, Guido Sacconi, Karin Scheele, Carl Schlyter, Richard Seeber, Kathy Sinnott, María Sornosa Martínez, Thomas Ulmer, Åsa Westlund

Substitutes present for the final vote

María del Pilar Ayuso González, David Casa, Bairbre de Brún, Jutta D. Haug, Roger Helmer, Erna Hennicot-Schoepges, Karsten Friedrich Hoppenstedt, Urszula Krupa, Kartika Tamara Liotard, Jiří Maštálka, Andres Tarand, Claude Turmes

Substitutes under Rule 178(2) present for the final vote

 

18.3.2005

OPINION OF THE COMMITTEE ON TRANSPORT AND TOURISM

for the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy

on the proposal for a decision of the European Parliament and of the Council laying down guidelines for trans-European energy networks and repealing Decisions No 96/391/EC and No 1229/2003/EC

(COM(2003)0742 – C5-0064/2004 – 2003/0297(COD))

Draftsman: Michael Cramer

SHORT JUSTIFICATION

The proposed Decision addresses the nature and scope of Community action to establish guidelines for trans-European energy networks. The guidelines identify projects of common interest, including priority projects among trans-European electricity and gas networks. The Decision also addresses the extension and connection of networks to the new Member States and to countries bordering the European Union. Within the field of gas networks a distinction is made between natural gas and olefins which are mainly ethylene and propylene used in the chemical industry and are derived from petroleum. At present the primary product, olefins, is transported in Europe by pipeline (70%), ship (20%) and the rest by barge or rail and it is for this reason that, in view of the short time available, I am writing to inform you of my committee's opinion.

Pipeline is the most common mode of transport of olefins, the primary product, from refinery to conversion plant. However, every day in Europe 55kt of polyolefins, a derivative, are moved by road from conversion plants to plastics factories. This represents 2,600 lorries on the road each day or close to a million lorry movements a year.

A judicious expansion of the olefin-carrying pipeline grid would shorten distances between conversion plants and plastics factories. The increased use of pipeline and reduced use of road would have attendant gains. For the environment it would mean lower CO2 and NOx emissions. In economic terms it would improve cost efficiency and plant use. It would also reduce accident risk.

Additionally pipeline expansion would integrate the five existing networks (British, French, ARA, Italian and East European) in one network.

AMENDMENTS

The Committee on Transport and Tourism calls on the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following amendments in its report:

Text proposed by the Commission(3)  Amendments by Parliament

Amendment 1

Recital 2

(2) The priorities for trans-European energy networks stem from the creation of a more open and competitive internal energy market as a result of the implementation of Directive 2003/54/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 26 June 2003 concerning common rules for the internal market in electricity and repealing Directive 96/32/EC and of Directive 2003/55/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 26 June 2003 concerning common rules for the internal market in natural gas and repealing Directive 98/30/EC. Those priorities follow the conclusions of the Stockholm European Council of March 2001 concerning the development of the infrastructures needed for the operation of the energy market. A special effort should be undertaken to achieve the objective of making greater use of renewable energy sources as a contribution to further a sustainable development policy. However, this should be achieved without creating disproportionate disturbances to the normal market equilibrium.

(2) The priorities for trans-European energy networks stem from the creation of a more open and competitive internal energy market as a result of the implementation of Directive 2003/54/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 26 June 2003 concerning common rules for the internal market in electricity and repealing Directive 96/32/EC and of Directive 2003/55/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 26 June 2003 concerning common rules for the internal market in natural gas and repealing Directive 98/30/EC. Those priorities follow the conclusions of the Stockholm European Council of March 2001 concerning the development of the infrastructures needed for the operation of the energy market. A special effort should be undertaken to achieve the objective of making greater use of renewable energy sources as a contribution to further a sustainable development policy. However, this should be achieved without creating disproportionate disturbances to the normal market equilibrium. Full account should also be taken of the objectives of the Community's transport policy and specifically the opportunity to reduce road traffic by using pipelines for natural gas and olefins.

Amendment 2

Article 2, point 2, point (d a) (new)

 

(da) any extensions of olefin pipelines to users where these are feasible.

Amendment 3

Article 4, point 3, point (c)

(c) development and integration of olefin gases networks in order to meet the olefin gases consumption needs of the industries in the Community.

(c) development and integration of olefin gases networks in order to meet the olefin gases consumption needs of the industries in the Community and extending olefin pipelines to users.

PROCEDURE

Title

Proposal for a decision of the European Parliament and of the Council laying down guidelines for trans-European energy networks and repealing Decisions No 96/391/EC and No 1229/2003/EC

References

COM(2003)0742 – C5-0064/2004 – 2003/0297(COD)

Committee responsible

ITRE

Committee asked for its opinion
  Date announced in plenary

TRAN
16.9.2004

Enhanced cooperation

No

Draftsman
  Date appointed

Michael Cramer
21.12.2004

Discussed in committee

2.2.2005

14.3.2005

 

 

 

Date amendments adopted

15.3.2005

Result of final vote

for:

against:

abstentions:

40

0

0

Members present for the final vote

Margrete Auken, Inés Ayala Sender, Etelka Barsi-Pataky, Paolo Costa, Michael Cramer, Arūnas Degutis, Christine De Veyrac, Armando Dionisi, Saïd El Khadraoui, Emanuel Jardim Fernandes, Luis de Grandes Pascual, Ewa Hedkvist Petersen, Jeanine Hennis-Plasschaert, Stanisław Jałowiecki, Georg Jarzembowski, Dieter-Lebrecht Koch, Jaromír Kohlíček, Jörg Leichtfried, Fernand Le Rachinel, Bogusław Liberadzki, Evelin Lichtenberger, Patrick Louis, Erik Meijer, Robert Navarro, Josu Ortuondo Larrea, Willi Piecyk, Luís Queiró, Reinhard Rack, Luca Romagnoli, Gilles Savary, Ingo Schmitt, Renate Sommer, Dirk Sterckx, Ulrich Stockmann, Gary Titley, Marta Vincenzi, Roberts Zile

Substitutes present for the final vote

Jean Louis Cottigny, Antonio López-Istúriz White, Helmuth Markov

Substitutes under Rule 178(2) present for the final vote

 

PROCEDURE

Title

Proposal for a decision of the European Parliament and of the Council laying down guidelines for trans-European energy networks and repealing Decisions No 96/391/EC and No 1229/2003/EC

References

COM(2003)0742 – C5-0064/2004 – 2003/0297(COD)

Legal basis

Articles 251(2) and 156 ECT

Basis in Rules of Procedure

Rule 51

Date submitted to Parliament

10.12.2003

Committee responsible
  Date authorisation announced in plenary

ITRE
16.9.2004

Committee(s) asked for opinion(s)
  Date announced in plenary

BUDG
16.9.2004

ECON
16.9.2004

ENVI
16.9.2004

IMCO 16.9.2004

TRAN 16.9.2004

Not delivering opinion(s)
  Date of decision

BUDG
14.3.2004

IMCO
31.8.2004

 

 

 

Enhanced cooperation

Date announced in plenary

 

 

 

 

 

Rapporteur(s)
  Date appointed

Anne Laperrouze
28.7.2004

 

Previous rapporteur(s)

 

 

Simplified procedure
  Date of decision

 

 

 

 

 

Legal basis disputed
  Date of JURI opinion

 

 

 

 

 

Financial endowment amended
  Date of BUDG opinion

 

 

 

 

 

European Economic and Social Committee consulted
  Date of decision in plenary

 

 

 

 

 

Committee of the Regions consulted
  Date of decision in plenary

 

 

 

 

 

Discussed in committee

17.1.2005

2.2.2005

16.3.2005

30.3.2005

 

Date adopted

26.4.2005

Result of final vote

for:

against:

abstentions:

39

5

1

Members present for the final vote

Ivo Belet, Šarūnas Birutis, Jan Březina, Philippe Busquin, Jerzy Buzek, Joan Calabuig Rull, Pilar del Castillo Vera, Jorgo Chatzimarkakis, Giles Chichester, Lena Ek, Nicole Fontaine, Adam Gierek, András Gyürk, Fiona Hall, David Hammerstein Mintz, Rebecca Harms, Romana Jordan Cizelj, Werner Langen, Anne Laperrouze, Pia Elda Locatelli, Eluned Morgan, Angelika Niebler, Reino Paasilinna, Pier Antonio Panzeri, Umberto Pirilli, Miloslav Ransdorf, Vladimír Remek, Teresa Riera Madurell, Paul Rübig, Andres Tarand,Catherine Trautmann, Claude Turmes, Nikolaos Vakalis, Alejo Vidal-Quadras Roca

Substitutes present for the final vote

Jan Christian Ehler, Malcolm Harbour, Erna Hennicot-Schoepges, Edit Herczog, Erika Mann, Lambert van Nistelrooij, John Purvis, Esko Seppänen, Hannes Swoboda

Substitutes under Rule 178(2) present for the final vote

Philip Bushill-Matthews, Alexander Lambsdorff

Date tabled – A6

3.5.2005

A6-0134/2005

(1)

Not yet published in OJ.

(2)

OJ C xxx, 12.10.2004, p. xxx.

(3)

Not yet published in OJ.

Last updated: 8 August 2006Legal notice