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Implementation of macro-regional strategies

20-02-2020

While each macro-regional strategy is unique in terms of the countries it brings together and the scope of its policies, they all share the same common aim: to ensure a coordinated approach to issues that are best tackled together. Building on the success of the pioneering 2009 European Union strategy for the Baltic Sea region, this form of cooperation has since become firmly embedded in the EU's institutional framework, with four strategies now in place, covering a total of 19 Member States and ...

While each macro-regional strategy is unique in terms of the countries it brings together and the scope of its policies, they all share the same common aim: to ensure a coordinated approach to issues that are best tackled together. Building on the success of the pioneering 2009 European Union strategy for the Baltic Sea region, this form of cooperation has since become firmly embedded in the EU's institutional framework, with four strategies now in place, covering a total of 19 Member States and 8 third countries. Every two years, the European Commission publishes a report to assess the implementation of these strategies, most recently in 2019. With the views of stakeholders and other players helping to complete the picture, it is possible to identify a number of challenges common to all macro-regional strategies in areas such as governance, funding, political commitment and the need to be more results oriented. This, in turn, has helped focus discussions on the future role of macro-regional strategies within the post 2020 cohesion policy framework. For while recent months have seen the idea of a fifth macro-regional strategy resurface, with negotiations now under way on the cohesion policy architecture beyond 2020, the future position of macro-regional strategies within this framework looks set to be the key issue in the coming months for all actors involved in the EU’s macro-regional strategies. Parliament has actively taken part in this debate, through its participation in trilogues on the cohesion policy package, and its 2018 resolution on the implementation of macro-regional strategies. The current Croatian EU Presidency has also committed to focusing on achieving the goals of macro-regional strategies and ensuring their complementarity with cohesion policy as part of its programme, helping to keep the issue high on the political agenda. Much will depend, however, on the outcome of the ongoing multiannual financial framework (MFF) negotiations, which will be critical not only for macro-regional strategies but also for the future shape of cohesion policy in general. This is an updated edition of a Briefing from September 2017.

Research for TRAN Committee - EU funding of transport projects

15-07-2019

This study provides an analysis of the most important EU funding instruments currently available for transport projects with the aim to evaluate the extent to which they are fulfilling strategic EU policy goals. Based on a thorough assessment of the overall performance of these instruments (through previous reports, interviews and case studies), and after identifying the main opportunities and challenges they will face in the future, the study proposes a set of recommendations on how to improve their ...

This study provides an analysis of the most important EU funding instruments currently available for transport projects with the aim to evaluate the extent to which they are fulfilling strategic EU policy goals. Based on a thorough assessment of the overall performance of these instruments (through previous reports, interviews and case studies), and after identifying the main opportunities and challenges they will face in the future, the study proposes a set of recommendations on how to improve their effectiveness and contribution to EU added value in the future.

Външен автор

José Manuel VASSALLO, Laura GARRIDO

EU policies – Delivering for citizens: Future financing of EU policies

28-06-2019

The principle of subsidiarity means that the European Union (EU) should act where it can do so more effectively than its constituent Member States individually, and this also holds true in the area of public finance – the EU's budget together with off-budget tools for financing EU policies. At €165.8 billion in 2019 – or approximately 1 % of Member States' collective gross national income (GNI) – the EU budget is a great deal smaller in relative terms than EU national governments' budgets. It serves ...

The principle of subsidiarity means that the European Union (EU) should act where it can do so more effectively than its constituent Member States individually, and this also holds true in the area of public finance – the EU's budget together with off-budget tools for financing EU policies. At €165.8 billion in 2019 – or approximately 1 % of Member States' collective gross national income (GNI) – the EU budget is a great deal smaller in relative terms than EU national governments' budgets. It serves mainly as a vehicle for investment, particularly in the areas of rural and regional development, industrial research and support for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), and political and economic development in neighbouring countries. These policies are designed to yield European public goods, with benefits that go beyond the national borders of individual EU countries. The Commission calculates that they do so for less than the cost of one cup of coffee a day per citizen. During the 2014-2019 parliamentary term, the EU was buffeted by challenges to its capacity to act, including financially, by geopolitical instability in the wider region, the migration and refugee crisis, and unresolved questions about the future of the euro, linked to the legacy of the economic, financial and sovereign debt crises. However, the EU also saw several notable achievements. These include the update to the financial rules governing the use of EU funds, simplifying the rules and strengthening the focus on performance and results; the creation of a European Public Prosecutor's Office to help address the roughly 0.35 % of the EU budget at risk of fraud; a mid-term revision of the multiannual financial framework (MFF), enhancing its flexibility to provide for a more responsive EU; the development of proposals for new sources of revenue in time for negotiations on the post-2020 MFF; and policy innovation in the field of financial engineering, helping EU finance go further by leveraging private investment. The 2019 elections mark a turning point in the future financing of EU policies, since the new Parliament will be responsible for concluding negotiations on the next multiannual spending plan. The Commission has proposed a 2021-2027 MFF totalling 1.11 % of the post-Brexit EU-27's GNI, and new sources of EU revenue to reduce the burden on national treasuries and forge a clearer link between revenue and policies. It also proposes to consolidate progress made in the last term with regard to budgetary flexibility, financial integrity and the rule of law, and in encouraging private investment in Europe. This is an update of an earlier briefing issued prior to the 2019 European elections.

Rules on political groups in the EP

05-06-2019

Members of the European Parliament (MEPs) may form political groups; these are organised not by nationality, but by political affiliation. Since the first direct elections in 1979, the number of political groups has fluctuated between seven and ten. Following the 2019 elections, the number, size and composition of political groups is likely to continue to fluctuate, as a result of the possible dissolution of some political groups and the creation of new ones. To form a political group, a minimum ...

Members of the European Parliament (MEPs) may form political groups; these are organised not by nationality, but by political affiliation. Since the first direct elections in 1979, the number of political groups has fluctuated between seven and ten. Following the 2019 elections, the number, size and composition of political groups is likely to continue to fluctuate, as a result of the possible dissolution of some political groups and the creation of new ones. To form a political group, a minimum of 25 MEPs, elected in at least one quarter (currently seven) of the EU's Member States is required. Those Members who do not belong to any political group are known as 'non-attached' (non-inscrits) Members. Although the political groups play a very prominent role in Parliament's life, individual MEPs and/or several MEPs acting together, also have many rights, including in relation to the exercise of oversight over other EU institutions, such as the Commission. However, belonging to a political group is of particular relevance when it comes to the allocation of key positions in Parliament's political and organisational structures, such as committee and delegation chairs and rapporteurships on important dossiers. Moreover, political groups receive higher funding for their collective staff and parliamentary activities than the non-attached MEPs. Political group funding, however, is distinct from funding granted to European political parties and foundations, which, if they comply with the requirements to register as such, may apply for funding from the European Parliament.

Performance Indicators for Convergence in Regional Development - How reliable are they to ensure Targeted and Result-Oriented spending?

15-04-2019

This study examines how reliable Cohesion Policy indicators are in helping to ensure targeted and result-oriented expenditure. Overall, substantial progress has been made in recent years in developing an effective system. However, the challenge remains to shift from a focus on financial absorption and outputs to assessing more meaningful results and impacts of interventions, and to improve data collection systems. The paper includes eleven recommendations to address these and other challenges ahead ...

This study examines how reliable Cohesion Policy indicators are in helping to ensure targeted and result-oriented expenditure. Overall, substantial progress has been made in recent years in developing an effective system. However, the challenge remains to shift from a focus on financial absorption and outputs to assessing more meaningful results and impacts of interventions, and to improve data collection systems. The paper includes eleven recommendations to address these and other challenges ahead of the new 2020-2027 period.

Външен автор

Jack Malan, Jayne Woolford, Sandra Ruiz-Fernandez, Michaela Brady, and Maria Kazakova from the Centre for Strategy & Evaluation Services LLP (CSES)

Mainstreaming Innovation Funding in the EU Budget

15-04-2019

This study provides a comprehensive assessment of how the EU budget supports innovation in the current programming period and analyses the approach to innovation financing in the Commission´s MFF 2021-2027 proposals. The findings provide the basis on which to draw recommendations to maximize the use of EU innovation funding in the coming MFF.

This study provides a comprehensive assessment of how the EU budget supports innovation in the current programming period and analyses the approach to innovation financing in the Commission´s MFF 2021-2027 proposals. The findings provide the basis on which to draw recommendations to maximize the use of EU innovation funding in the coming MFF.

Външен автор

EDr. Eulalia Rubio, Jacques Delors Institute Dr Fabian Zuleeg, European Policy Centre Emilie Magdalinski, Jacques Delors Institute Thomas Pellerin-Carlin, Jacques Delors Institute Marta Pilati, European Policy Centre Philipp Ständer, Jacques Delors Institut -Berlin

Research for REGI Committee - Economic, social and territorial situation of Portugal

13-03-2019

This briefing was prepared to provide information for the European Parliament’s Committee on Regional Development delegation visit to Portugal of 27 February to 1 March 2019.

This briefing was prepared to provide information for the European Parliament’s Committee on Regional Development delegation visit to Portugal of 27 February to 1 March 2019.

EU anti-fraud programme 2021-2027

07-02-2019

On 30 May 2018, the European Commission published a proposal for a regulation establishing an EU anti-fraud programme under the new 2021 to 2027 multiannual financial framework (MFF). The regulation would replace the Hercule III programme currently in force. The European Court of Auditors (ECA) published a special opinion concerning the proposal on 15 November 2018. The BUDG committee adopted its opinion for CONT on 23 November 2018 and the CONT committee issued its draft report on 26 November 2018 ...

On 30 May 2018, the European Commission published a proposal for a regulation establishing an EU anti-fraud programme under the new 2021 to 2027 multiannual financial framework (MFF). The regulation would replace the Hercule III programme currently in force. The European Court of Auditors (ECA) published a special opinion concerning the proposal on 15 November 2018. The BUDG committee adopted its opinion for CONT on 23 November 2018 and the CONT committee issued its draft report on 26 November 2018. More than 30 amendments were tabled ahead of the vote on the report in the CONT committee on 29 January 2019. The vote in plenary is expected to take place in February 2019. The Commission is proposing to streamline budgetary management in the area of protection of the EU's financial interests by grouping the Hercule III programme together with Anti-Fraud Information System (AFIS) and Irregularity Management System (IMS) operational activities. However, the proposed EU anti-fraud programme does not specify possible maximum co-financing rates for eligible actions. The proposal has also been criticised for its lack of specific and measurable objectives and its vague performance indicators, as well as for not having indicated the frequency of performance reporting. The amendments proposed by the ECA, and also by the BUDG and CONT committees attempt to tackle these issues. Moreover, both Parliament committees are in favour of increasing the budget for this programme. First edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Association of the Overseas Countries and Territories with the EU, 2021–2027

28-01-2019

In view of the upcoming Multiannual Financial Framework for 2021 to 2027, the European Commission has proposed to fund not only Greenland, but also all other Overseas Countries and Territories (OCTs), through the EU budget. In line with this, the Commission has adopted a proposal for a Council decision to replace both the decision on the Association of OCTs with the EU and the decision on relations with Greenland. The European Parliament, which is only consulted, is expected to discuss the report ...

In view of the upcoming Multiannual Financial Framework for 2021 to 2027, the European Commission has proposed to fund not only Greenland, but also all other Overseas Countries and Territories (OCTs), through the EU budget. In line with this, the Commission has adopted a proposal for a Council decision to replace both the decision on the Association of OCTs with the EU and the decision on relations with Greenland. The European Parliament, which is only consulted, is expected to discuss the report adopted by its Committee on Development during its January II plenary session. The report welcomes the proposal, but calls for the future decision to better reflect the OCTs' voices and specificities in EU strategies and programming.

Modernising and simplifying the common agricultural policy

25-01-2019

The Commission proposed to modernise and simplify the CAP in the 2021-2027 budget period. The supporting impact assessment is in line with the requirements of the Better Regulation Guidelines when it comes to the set of objectives, the wide stakeholder consultation, the combined use of qualitative and quantitative methods and tools, the assessments of efficiency and effectiveness of the various options. However, the choice of the new delivery model, the availability of mid-term evaluation studies ...

The Commission proposed to modernise and simplify the CAP in the 2021-2027 budget period. The supporting impact assessment is in line with the requirements of the Better Regulation Guidelines when it comes to the set of objectives, the wide stakeholder consultation, the combined use of qualitative and quantitative methods and tools, the assessments of efficiency and effectiveness of the various options. However, the choice of the new delivery model, the availability of mid-term evaluation studies, coherence and proportionality assessment of the options, consultation on the IA contents or options fall short of the Better Regulation Guidelines.

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