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Post-2020 reform of the EU Emissions Trading System

28-05-2018

In July 2015, the European Commission proposed a reform of the EU Emissions Trading System (ETS) for the 2021-2030 period, following the guidance set by the October 2014 European Council meeting. The proposed directive introduces a new limit on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the ETS sector to achieve the EU climate targets for 2030, new rules for addressing carbon leakage, and provisions for funding innovation and modernisation in the energy sector. It encourages Member States to compensate for ...

In July 2015, the European Commission proposed a reform of the EU Emissions Trading System (ETS) for the 2021-2030 period, following the guidance set by the October 2014 European Council meeting. The proposed directive introduces a new limit on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the ETS sector to achieve the EU climate targets for 2030, new rules for addressing carbon leakage, and provisions for funding innovation and modernisation in the energy sector. It encourages Member States to compensate for indirect carbon costs. In combination with the Market Stability Reserve agreed in May 2015, the proposed reform sets out the EU ETS rules for the period until 2030, giving greater certainty to both industry and investors. In the European Parliament, the ENVI Committee took the lead on the proposal, while it shared competence with the ITRE Committee on some aspects. The European Parliament and the Council adopted their respective positions in February 2017, and interinstitutional trilogue negotiations were concluded in November 2017. After its adoption by Council and Parliament, the Directive entered into force on 8 April 2018.

EU emissions trading system: Post-2020 reform

31-01-2018

In July 2015, the European Commission proposed a reform of the EU emissions trading system (ETS) for the 2021-2030 period. The proposed directive introduces tighter limits on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to achieve the EU's 2030 climate targets, while protecting energy-intensive industries from the risk of 'carbon leakage'. The Parliament is expected to vote on it in plenary in February.

In July 2015, the European Commission proposed a reform of the EU emissions trading system (ETS) for the 2021-2030 period. The proposed directive introduces tighter limits on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to achieve the EU's 2030 climate targets, while protecting energy-intensive industries from the risk of 'carbon leakage'. The Parliament is expected to vote on it in plenary in February.

Post-2020 reform of the EU Emissions Trading System

28-11-2017

In July 2015, the European Commission proposed a reform of the EU Emissions Trading System (ETS) for the period 2021-2030, following the guidance set by the October 2014 European Council. The proposed directive introduces a new limit on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the ETS sector to achieve the EU climate targets for 2030, new rules for addressing carbon leakage, and provisions for funding innovation and modernisation in the energy sector. It encourages Member States to compensate for indirect ...

In July 2015, the European Commission proposed a reform of the EU Emissions Trading System (ETS) for the period 2021-2030, following the guidance set by the October 2014 European Council. The proposed directive introduces a new limit on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the ETS sector to achieve the EU climate targets for 2030, new rules for addressing carbon leakage, and provisions for funding innovation and modernisation in the energy sector. It encourages Member States to compensate for indirect carbon costs. In combination with the Market Stability Reserve agreed in May 2015, the proposed reform sets out the EU ETS rules for the period up to 2030, giving greater certainty to industry and to investors. In the European Parliament, the ENVI Committee took the lead on the proposal, while it shared competence with the ITRE Committee on some aspects. After the European Parliament and the Council adopted their respective positions in February 2017, interinstitutional trilogue negotiations were concluded in November 2017. This briefing updates an earlier edition, of April 2017: PE 599.398.

Financing the transition to clean energy in Europe

27-10-2017

Clean energy is energy produced and consumed generating a minimum of greenhouse gas emissions or other pollution. The level of emissions associated with energy use can meanwhile also be lowered by means of energy efficiency measures reducing demand for energy. To meet the targets of the Paris Agreement (to keep the global temperature rise to well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels, aiming at 1.5°C), greenhouse gas emissions must be near zero in the second half of this century. For the energy sector ...

Clean energy is energy produced and consumed generating a minimum of greenhouse gas emissions or other pollution. The level of emissions associated with energy use can meanwhile also be lowered by means of energy efficiency measures reducing demand for energy. To meet the targets of the Paris Agreement (to keep the global temperature rise to well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels, aiming at 1.5°C), greenhouse gas emissions must be near zero in the second half of this century. For the energy sector, this means that fossil fuels must be phased out and replaced by low-carbon energy sources. This calls for an unprecedented transition in energy production and consumption, requiring trillions of euros in investment. Financing such a large-scale transition is primarily a task for the private sector, but governments and the EU also have a critical role to play in creating a supportive policy framework. This includes markets for energy and carbon, taxation, regulation, incen¬tives, finance for key infrastructure, and innovation, coordination and information. In the framework of the energy union, the European Commission has proposed a package of legislation and policies to support the transition towards clean energy. The EU has also dedicated 20 % of its budget to climate action, including clean energy. The European Parliament is championing an ambitious climate and energy policy; it regards the carbon and electricity markets as key drivers and favours strong targets for energy efficiency and renewable energy sources.

Digitising European industry

24-05-2017

In response to the European Commission's recent efforts to advance the digitalisation of EU industry, the European Parliament's Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE) drew up an own-initiative report on the subject which is to be debated in plenary in May. The report proposes to develop an integrated strategy aimed at creating conditions conducive to reindustrialising the European economy so that it can fully benefit from opportunities offered by digitalisation.

In response to the European Commission's recent efforts to advance the digitalisation of EU industry, the European Parliament's Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE) drew up an own-initiative report on the subject which is to be debated in plenary in May. The report proposes to develop an integrated strategy aimed at creating conditions conducive to reindustrialising the European economy so that it can fully benefit from opportunities offered by digitalisation.

Post-2020 reform of the EU Emissions Trading System

05-04-2017

In July 2015, the European Commission proposed a reform of the EU Emissions Trading System (ETS) for the period 2021-2030, following the guidance set by the October 2014 European Council. The proposed directive introduces a new limit on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the ETS sector to achieve the EU climate targets for 2030, new rules for addressing carbon leakage, and provisions for funding innovation and modernisation in the energy sector. It encourages Member States to compensate for indirect ...

In July 2015, the European Commission proposed a reform of the EU Emissions Trading System (ETS) for the period 2021-2030, following the guidance set by the October 2014 European Council. The proposed directive introduces a new limit on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the ETS sector to achieve the EU climate targets for 2030, new rules for addressing carbon leakage, and provisions for funding innovation and modernisation in the energy sector. It encourages Member States to compensate for indirect carbon costs. In combination with the Market Stability Reserve agreed in May 2015, the proposed reform sets out the EU ETS rules for the period up to 2030, giving greater certainty to industry and to investors. In the European Parliament, the ENVI Committee takes the lead on the proposal, while it shares competence with the ITRE Committee on some aspects. After the European Parliament and the Council finalised their respective positions in February 2017, interinstitutional trilogue negotiations have now started.

Towards a stronger EU emissions trading system

07-02-2017

In July 2015, the European Commission proposed a reform of the EU emissions trading system (ETS) for the 2021-2030 period. The proposed directive introduces tighter limits on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to achieve the EU's 2030 climate targets, while protecting energy-intensive industries from the risk of 'carbon leakage'. The Parliament is expected to vote on it during the February II session.

In July 2015, the European Commission proposed a reform of the EU emissions trading system (ETS) for the 2021-2030 period. The proposed directive introduces tighter limits on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to achieve the EU's 2030 climate targets, while protecting energy-intensive industries from the risk of 'carbon leakage'. The Parliament is expected to vote on it during the February II session.

Post-2020 reform of the EU Emissions Trading System

01-02-2017

In July 2015, the European Commission proposed a reform of the EU Emissions Trading System (ETS) for the period 2021-2030, following the guidance set by the October 2014 European Council. The proposed directive introduces a new limit on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the ETS sector to achieve the EU climate targets for 2030, new rules for addressing carbon leakage, and provisions for funding innovation and modernisation in the energy sector. It encourages Member States to compensate for indirect ...

In July 2015, the European Commission proposed a reform of the EU Emissions Trading System (ETS) for the period 2021-2030, following the guidance set by the October 2014 European Council. The proposed directive introduces a new limit on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the ETS sector to achieve the EU climate targets for 2030, new rules for addressing carbon leakage, and provisions for funding innovation and modernisation in the energy sector. It encourages Member States to compensate for indirect carbon costs. In combination with the Market Stability Reserve agreed in May 2015, the proposed reform sets out the EU ETS rules for the period up to 2030, giving greater certainty to industry and to investors. In the European Parliament, the ENVI Committee takes the lead on the proposal, while it shares competence with the ITRE Committee on some aspects. The ITRE Committee adopted its opinion on 13 October 2016; the ENVI Committee adopted its report on 15 December 2016, and a vote in plenary is expected in February 2017. A more recent edition of this document is available. Find it by searching by the document title at this address: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/thinktank/en/home.html

Industry 4.0

15-02-2016

This study, prepared by Policy Department A at the request of the ITRE committee, analyses the Industry 4.0 Initiative which encompasses the digitalisation of production processes based on devices autonomously communicating with each other along the value chain. It considers the potential of the initiative and business paradigm changes and impacts of this transformation. The study assesses the rationale for public intervention and outlines measures that could be adopted to increase the gains and ...

This study, prepared by Policy Department A at the request of the ITRE committee, analyses the Industry 4.0 Initiative which encompasses the digitalisation of production processes based on devices autonomously communicating with each other along the value chain. It considers the potential of the initiative and business paradigm changes and impacts of this transformation. The study assesses the rationale for public intervention and outlines measures that could be adopted to increase the gains and limit the threats from Industry 4.0.

Външен автор

Jan SMIT (Centre for Strategy & Evaluation Services LLP), Stephan KREUTZER (Centre for Strategy & Evaluation Services LLP), Carolin MOELLER (Centre for Strategy & Evaluation Services LLP) and Malin CARLBERG (Centre for Strategy & Evaluation Services LLP)

Industry 4.0: Digitalisation for productivity and growth

22-09-2015

Many observers believe that Europe is at the beginning of a new industrial revolution, considered to be the fourth such leap forward and hence labelled Industry 4.0. The ubiquitous use of sensors, the expansion of wireless communication and networks, the deployment of increasingly intelligent robots and machines – as well as increased computing power at lower cost and the development of 'big data' analytics – has the potential to transform the way goods are manufactured in Europe. This new, digital ...

Many observers believe that Europe is at the beginning of a new industrial revolution, considered to be the fourth such leap forward and hence labelled Industry 4.0. The ubiquitous use of sensors, the expansion of wireless communication and networks, the deployment of increasingly intelligent robots and machines – as well as increased computing power at lower cost and the development of 'big data' analytics – has the potential to transform the way goods are manufactured in Europe. This new, digital industrial revolution holds the promise of increased flexibility in manufacturing, mass customisation, increased speed, better quality and improved productivity. However to capture these benefits, enterprises will need to invest in equipment, information and communication technologies (ICTs) and data analysis as well as the integration of data flows throughout the global value chain. The EU supports industrial change through its industrial policy and through research and infrastructure funding. Member States are also sponsoring national initiatives such as Industrie 4.0 in Germany, the Factory of the Future in France and Italy, and Catapult centres in the UK. However challenges remain. The need for investment, changing business models, data issues, legal questions of liability and intellectual property, standards, and skills mismatches are among the challenges that must be met if benefits are to be gained from new manufacturing and industrial technologies. If these obstacles can be overcome, Industry 4.0 may help to reverse the past decline in industrialisation and increase total value added from manufacturing to a targeted 20% of all value added by 2020. Please click here for the full publication in PDF format

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