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Trade and biodiversity

Podrobná analýza 05-06-2020

International trade has a direct impact on EU biodiversity, imported invasive species and pathogens, being an example. Trade also impacts global biodiversity, for instance through the 'virtual' water, land, and deforestation contained in EU imports. Economic theory shows that trade with countries that fail to protect a renewable resource can be detrimental for all. Protecting global biodiversity calls for a variety of instruments, at the EU border as well as in the provisions of preferential agreements ...

Following the European Council's additional guidelines of March 2018, the European Union (EU) and the United Kingdom (UK) have started discussions on their future relationship after Brexit. The aim is to agree on a political framework for their future partnership by autumn 2018, to be adopted alongside the withdrawal agreement. Conclusion of a treaty or treaties establishing future EU-UK relations will only take place after the UK leaves the Union and becomes a third country. Both parties have expressed ...

The EU neighbourhood is undergoing deep transformations and this raises debate on how best to establish trade relations with neighbouring partners, like Turkey and the Eastern Partnership countries (such as Ukraine, Moldova and Georgia). Moreover, Brexit will entail the reorganisation of EU-UK relations, which will shake up cross-border trade flows. The EU can negotiate two basic types of trade agreement granting preferential market access to partners’ goods: free trade agreements (FTAs) and customs ...

This paper was prepared by Policy Department A at the request of the European Parliament’s Committee on the Internal Market and Consumer Protection. It finds that there is significant scope for the EU to benefit from freeing up of transatlantic services trade while safeguarding European values and preserving the right to regulate. Importantly, TTIP negotiation of reduced transatlantic regulatory barriers will help unify the internal EU services market, leading to significant increases in intra-EU ...

The world has seen rapid growth of preferential trade and investment agreements (PTAs) that, by definition, aim to go beyond the existing WTO obligations of the parties. With this growth comes the danger of incompatible obligations as these PTAs overlap within a country. This study examines the sources of overlap in various PTAs and the compliance costs that PTAs may create for a developing country, with a special focus on the agricultural realm. Examining the reality of divergent SPS standards, ...

This Policy Department A study for ECON covers rules on trade in financial services in preferential trade agreements (PTA), in view of current TTIP negotiations. The financial services sector is of strategic importance in trade policy. The EU has already obtained considerable PTA concessions, incl. new investor protection rights. Its PTAs also contain more developed disciplines on financial regulation, incl. prior comment obligations, data processing rules, prudential regulation and use of international ...

This paper assesses the substance of EU preferential trade agreements compared to those of the United States, EFTA and Japan. The topic is important because of the growth of PTAs but also because PTAs are destined to remain at centre stage. The debate on PTAs is not therefore about whether and how they might grow in importance but rather how they reflect trade policy preferences of the parties and how preferential and multilateral approaches will interact. While PTAs can promote liberalisation in ...

Presentations of the workshop on "Trade and Investment for Development" held on 29 March 2012 in Brussels.

The study first surveys the key issues resulting from the long banana dispute at the WTO. It distinguishes 3 phases in the attempt by the EC to design an EU-wide and WTO-compatible banana import regime: the first (1993-1999) in which the first regime applicable to all EU member countries was introduced and challenged in WTO, and the first modifications made with changes to the methods for delivery of import licenses; the second phase (1999-2005) when the future regime was negotiated and the transition ...

A snapshot of the banana trade: Who gets what?

Podrobná analýza 30-06-2010

With the “Agreement of Geneva” the dispute about the banana imports over 15 years seems to come to an end. The liberalisation caused by this agreement will have a substantial impact on the international banana market. In order to estimate the possible effects and measures to be implemented in the future it is necessary to know the current situation of the banana trade, the factors determining trade policies, the main stakeholders and nodes in the value chain for bananas as well as their impact on ...