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The main avenue through which the European Union (EU) contributes to strengthening international peace and security is its common security and defence policy (CSDP). Enshrined in the Lisbon Treaty, this policy is the main framework through which EU Member States take joint action on security and defence matters. The European Parliament is set to vote on the annual CSDP report covering 2020 during the January 2021 plenary session.

New rules on security of gas supply

Ve stručnosti 05-09-2017

In February 2016, the Commission adopted a proposal to revise the 2010 regulation on security of gas supply. Trilogue negotiations in early 2017 produced an agreed text that was endorsed by the Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE) committee in May 2017. The Parliament is due to vote on this text during the September 2017 plenary.

The concept of hybrid threat has gained traction in relation to Russia’s actions in Ukraine and the ISIL/Da’esh campaigns going far beyond Syria and Iraq. Faced with this constantly evolving challenge, the European Union and NATO have taken several steps to strengthen their respective capabilities and pursue common objectives through closer cooperation. The EU-NATO joint declaration adopted in July 2016 in the margins of the Warsaw NATO Summit represents a clear step forward in this regard. The document ...

Following the terrorist attacks in Paris on 13 November 2015, France requested aid and assistance from the other Member States based on Article 42(7) TEU. This represented the first activation of the mutual assistance clause since the Lisbon Treaty introduced it in 2009. Member States expressed their solidarity and political support to France instantly and unanimously. Within days, several Member States, including Germany and the United Kingdom, decided on a series of contributions. More decisions ...

This  Special  Eurobarometer  of  the  European  Parliament  was conducted in the 28 Member States of the European Union, from 9 to 25 April 2016, by TNS opinion.  It  focuses  on  the  perceptions  and  expectations  Europeans  have regarding  the  EU’s  action,  the  fight  against  terrorism  and  the mutual defence clause.

EU citizens show strong expectations for increased involvement of the EU in the fight against terrorism. The current EU legal framework is limited by the primary role of the Member States in this area. Nevertheless, there is still the scope and potential for increased EU involvement within the current legal framework. This briefing considers this and also covers current and potential relevant financing at EU level. Financial instruments that tackle counter-terrorism directly, indirectly or partially ...

Decisions on security and defence policy are, most of the time, taken by the EU-28's national governments and usually without public scrutiny. Yet, almost two thirds of EU citizens would like the EU to intervene in this policy area more than it does at present. Since the introduction of the Common Foreign and Security Policy (CFSP) in the Treaty of Maastricht, the EU has made substantial progress in assuming its role as a regional security provider. Although significantly strengthened by the Treaty ...

On 16 February 2016 the European Commission proposed a new regulation on security of gas supply as part of its sustainable energy security package, in order to develop a stronger collective response to future supply risks, particularly concerning Russian gas arriving via the Ukrainian transit route. The Commission proposal would replace the existing regulation (in force since December 2010) and address weaknesses highlighted in an implementation report, EU gas stress tests and a public consultation ...

Following the terrorist attacks in Paris on 13 November 2015, France requested aid and assistance from the other Member States based on Article 42(7) TEU. This represented the first activation of the mutual assistance clause since the Lisbon Treaty introduced it in 2009. Member States expressed their solidarity and political support to France instantly and unanimously. Within days, several Member States, including Germany and the United Kingdom, decided on a series of contributions. More decisions ...

The Lisbon Treaty introduced new mechanisms, including a mutual assistance clause, permanent structured cooperation and enhanced cooperation, with the aim of allowing for more flexibility in applying the Common Security and Defence Policy. With the exception of the mutual assistance (defence) clause, which was invoked for the first time in November 2015, the other new mechanisms have not yet been implemented, notwithstanding 20 resolutions of the European Parliament calling for the implementation ...