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Post-2020 reform of the EU Emissions Trading System

28-05-2018

In July 2015, the European Commission proposed a reform of the EU Emissions Trading System (ETS) for the 2021-2030 period, following the guidance set by the October 2014 European Council meeting. The proposed directive introduces a new limit on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the ETS sector to achieve the EU climate targets for 2030, new rules for addressing carbon leakage, and provisions for funding innovation and modernisation in the energy sector. It encourages Member States to compensate for ...

In July 2015, the European Commission proposed a reform of the EU Emissions Trading System (ETS) for the 2021-2030 period, following the guidance set by the October 2014 European Council meeting. The proposed directive introduces a new limit on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the ETS sector to achieve the EU climate targets for 2030, new rules for addressing carbon leakage, and provisions for funding innovation and modernisation in the energy sector. It encourages Member States to compensate for indirect carbon costs. In combination with the Market Stability Reserve agreed in May 2015, the proposed reform sets out the EU ETS rules for the period until 2030, giving greater certainty to both industry and investors. In the European Parliament, the ENVI Committee took the lead on the proposal, while it shared competence with the ITRE Committee on some aspects. The European Parliament and the Council adopted their respective positions in February 2017, and interinstitutional trilogue negotiations were concluded in November 2017. After its adoption by Council and Parliament, the Directive entered into force on 8 April 2018.

EU emissions trading system: Post-2020 reform

31-01-2018

In July 2015, the European Commission proposed a reform of the EU emissions trading system (ETS) for the 2021-2030 period. The proposed directive introduces tighter limits on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to achieve the EU's 2030 climate targets, while protecting energy-intensive industries from the risk of 'carbon leakage'. The Parliament is expected to vote on it in plenary in February.

In July 2015, the European Commission proposed a reform of the EU emissions trading system (ETS) for the 2021-2030 period. The proposed directive introduces tighter limits on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to achieve the EU's 2030 climate targets, while protecting energy-intensive industries from the risk of 'carbon leakage'. The Parliament is expected to vote on it in plenary in February.

Post-2020 reform of the EU Emissions Trading System

28-11-2017

In July 2015, the European Commission proposed a reform of the EU Emissions Trading System (ETS) for the period 2021-2030, following the guidance set by the October 2014 European Council. The proposed directive introduces a new limit on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the ETS sector to achieve the EU climate targets for 2030, new rules for addressing carbon leakage, and provisions for funding innovation and modernisation in the energy sector. It encourages Member States to compensate for indirect ...

In July 2015, the European Commission proposed a reform of the EU Emissions Trading System (ETS) for the period 2021-2030, following the guidance set by the October 2014 European Council. The proposed directive introduces a new limit on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the ETS sector to achieve the EU climate targets for 2030, new rules for addressing carbon leakage, and provisions for funding innovation and modernisation in the energy sector. It encourages Member States to compensate for indirect carbon costs. In combination with the Market Stability Reserve agreed in May 2015, the proposed reform sets out the EU ETS rules for the period up to 2030, giving greater certainty to industry and to investors. In the European Parliament, the ENVI Committee took the lead on the proposal, while it shared competence with the ITRE Committee on some aspects. After the European Parliament and the Council adopted their respective positions in February 2017, interinstitutional trilogue negotiations were concluded in November 2017. This briefing updates an earlier edition, of April 2017: PE 599.398.

Financing the transition to clean energy in Europe

27-10-2017

Clean energy is energy produced and consumed generating a minimum of greenhouse gas emissions or other pollution. The level of emissions associated with energy use can meanwhile also be lowered by means of energy efficiency measures reducing demand for energy. To meet the targets of the Paris Agreement (to keep the global temperature rise to well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels, aiming at 1.5°C), greenhouse gas emissions must be near zero in the second half of this century. For the energy sector ...

Clean energy is energy produced and consumed generating a minimum of greenhouse gas emissions or other pollution. The level of emissions associated with energy use can meanwhile also be lowered by means of energy efficiency measures reducing demand for energy. To meet the targets of the Paris Agreement (to keep the global temperature rise to well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels, aiming at 1.5°C), greenhouse gas emissions must be near zero in the second half of this century. For the energy sector, this means that fossil fuels must be phased out and replaced by low-carbon energy sources. This calls for an unprecedented transition in energy production and consumption, requiring trillions of euros in investment. Financing such a large-scale transition is primarily a task for the private sector, but governments and the EU also have a critical role to play in creating a supportive policy framework. This includes markets for energy and carbon, taxation, regulation, incen¬tives, finance for key infrastructure, and innovation, coordination and information. In the framework of the energy union, the European Commission has proposed a package of legislation and policies to support the transition towards clean energy. The EU has also dedicated 20 % of its budget to climate action, including clean energy. The European Parliament is championing an ambitious climate and energy policy; it regards the carbon and electricity markets as key drivers and favours strong targets for energy efficiency and renewable energy sources.