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Reduced VAT rate for e-publications

19-12-2018

The fact that print and digital publications have been subject to separate value added tax (VAT) rates essentially means that products that are considered to be comparable and substitutable have been treated differently to one another. This situation resulted from rules which, on the one hand, allowed Member States to apply reduced rates to printed publications, but on the other excluded this possibility for digital publications. In addition, the evolution in the VAT framework means that VAT on digital ...

The fact that print and digital publications have been subject to separate value added tax (VAT) rates essentially means that products that are considered to be comparable and substitutable have been treated differently to one another. This situation resulted from rules which, on the one hand, allowed Member States to apply reduced rates to printed publications, but on the other excluded this possibility for digital publications. In addition, the evolution in the VAT framework means that VAT on digital services should be levied in the Member State where the consumer is based (thus protecting the single market from application of different rates within a Member State because of the different location of providers). The question of broadening the possibility to apply reduced rates to all publications, be they print or digital, was addressed as part of the VAT digital single market package. The amendment to the VAT directive was adopted by the Council on 6 November 2018, after the European Parliament had delivered its opinion on 1 June 2017. The new rules allow Member States to apply the reduced rate to e-publications, as from 4 December 2018.

More flexible VAT rates

25-10-2018

Value added tax (VAT) is an important source of revenue for national governments and the European Union (EU) budget and, from an economic point of view, a very efficient consumption tax. However, the rules governing value added tax as applied to intra-Community trade are 25 years old and the current common EU VAT system is both complicated and vulnerable to fraud. Businesses doing cross-border trade face high compliance costs and the administrative burden of national tax administrations is also excessive ...

Value added tax (VAT) is an important source of revenue for national governments and the European Union (EU) budget and, from an economic point of view, a very efficient consumption tax. However, the rules governing value added tax as applied to intra-Community trade are 25 years old and the current common EU VAT system is both complicated and vulnerable to fraud. Businesses doing cross-border trade face high compliance costs and the administrative burden of national tax administrations is also excessive. The reform towards the definitive system is planned in several consecutive steps and will take some years. In the meantime, this proposal will amend the VAT Directive (Directive 2006/112/EC) and reform the rules by which Member States set VAT rates. The reform will enter into force when the definitive system is in place; it will give more flexibility to Member States to set VAT rates and will end the current arrangements and their many ad-hoc derogations. Parliament has adopted its non-binding opinion on the proposal, which is now in the hands of the Council. Second edition of a briefing originally drafted by Ana Claudia Alfieri. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. Please note this document has been designed for on-line viewing.

Introducing the definitive VAT system for B2B cross-border trade

18-07-2018

Value added tax (VAT) is an important source of revenue for national governments and the European Union (EU) budget and, from an economic point of view, it is a very efficient consumption tax. However, the existing rules governing intra-Community trade are 25 years old and the current common EU VAT system presents such problems as vulnerability to fraud, high compliance costs for businesses and also a heavy administrative burden for national authorities. The reform of the system is planned in several ...

Value added tax (VAT) is an important source of revenue for national governments and the European Union (EU) budget and, from an economic point of view, it is a very efficient consumption tax. However, the existing rules governing intra-Community trade are 25 years old and the current common EU VAT system presents such problems as vulnerability to fraud, high compliance costs for businesses and also a heavy administrative burden for national authorities. The reform of the system is planned in several consecutive steps, first for goods and then for services, and will take some years. This proposal introduces the basic features of the definite VAT system for business-to-business (B2B) transactions of goods and aims to harmonise and simplify certain rules of the current VAT system, by amending the VAT Directive (Directive 2006/112/EC). First edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Common corporate tax base (CCTB)

15-06-2018

The European Commission has decided to re-launch the common consolidated corporate tax base (CCCTB) project in a two-step approach, with the publication on 25 October 2016 of two new interconnected proposals on a common corporate tax base (CCTB) and a common consolidated corporate tax base (CCCTB). The 2016 CCTB provides for the determination of a single set of rules for calculation of the corporate tax base. Companies operating across borders in the EU would no longer have to deal with 28 different ...

The European Commission has decided to re-launch the common consolidated corporate tax base (CCCTB) project in a two-step approach, with the publication on 25 October 2016 of two new interconnected proposals on a common corporate tax base (CCTB) and a common consolidated corporate tax base (CCCTB). The 2016 CCTB provides for the determination of a single set of rules for calculation of the corporate tax base. Companies operating across borders in the EU would no longer have to deal with 28 different sets of national rules when calculating their taxable profits. The intention is that the proposed CCTB is a step on the way towards re-establishing the link between taxation and the place where profits are made, via an apportionment formula to be introduced through the new CCCTB proposal. The legislative proposal falls under the consultation procedure. In the European Parliament, it was assigned to the Economic and Monetary Affairs Committee. The committee adopted its report on 21 February 2018. Parliament adopted its opinion in plenary on 15 March 2018. The proposal is now in the hands of the Council. Third edition, based on an original briefing by Gustaf Gimdal. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Common consolidated corporate tax base (CCCTB)

15-06-2018

The European Commission has decided to re-launch the common consolidated corporate tax base (CCCTB) project in a two-step approach, with the publication on 25 October 2016 of two new interconnected proposals: on a common corporate tax base (CCTB), and on a common consolidated corporate tax base (CCCTB). Building on the 2016 CCTB proposal, the 2016 CCCTB proposal introduces the consolidation aspect of this double initiative. Companies operating across borders in the EU would no longer have to deal ...

The European Commission has decided to re-launch the common consolidated corporate tax base (CCCTB) project in a two-step approach, with the publication on 25 October 2016 of two new interconnected proposals: on a common corporate tax base (CCTB), and on a common consolidated corporate tax base (CCCTB). Building on the 2016 CCTB proposal, the 2016 CCCTB proposal introduces the consolidation aspect of this double initiative. Companies operating across borders in the EU would no longer have to deal with 28 different sets of national rules when calculating their taxable profits. Consolidation means that there would be a ‘one-stop-shop’ – the principal tax authority – where one of the companies of a group, that is, the principal taxpayer, would file a tax return. To distribute the tax base among Member States concerned, a formulary apportionment system is introduced. The legislative proposal falls under the consultation procedure. The report was adopted in the ECON committee on 21 February and Parliament’s opinion in plenary on 15 March 2018. the proposal is thus now in the hands of the Council. Third edition, based on an original briefing by Gustaf Gimdal. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Common (consolidated) corporate tax base

06-03-2018

In 2016, the Commission decided to re-launch the common consolidated corporate tax base proposal, but this time in a two-step approach, with two interconnected proposals. Parliament, which is only consulted, is due to vote on the proposals during its March plenary session.

In 2016, the Commission decided to re-launch the common consolidated corporate tax base proposal, but this time in a two-step approach, with two interconnected proposals. Parliament, which is only consulted, is due to vote on the proposals during its March plenary session.

Value added tax: Administrative cooperation and combating fraud

15-02-2018

This proposal was part of a package of proposed EU legislation that aims to modernise the VAT regime for cross-border B2C e-commerce. It provides the basis for the underlying IT infrastructure and the necessary cooperation by Member States to ensure the success of the extension of the mini-one-stop-shop (MOSS). It contains provisions relating to – among other things – the exchange of information between competent authorities of Member States, and the control of transactions and taxable persons, as ...

This proposal was part of a package of proposed EU legislation that aims to modernise the VAT regime for cross-border B2C e-commerce. It provides the basis for the underlying IT infrastructure and the necessary cooperation by Member States to ensure the success of the extension of the mini-one-stop-shop (MOSS). It contains provisions relating to – among other things – the exchange of information between competent authorities of Member States, and the control of transactions and taxable persons, as well as Member States granting to the Commission access to statistical information contained in their electronic systems. The regulation, significantly amended, was adopted by the Council – after consulting the European Parliament – on 5 December 2017. It is accompanied by Council Directive 2017/2455, which amends Directive 2006/112/EC and Directive 2009/132/EC as regards certain value added tax obligations for supplies of services and distance sales of goods; see our separate briefing on this dossier – 2016/0370(CNS). Final edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Definitive VAT system and fighting VAT fraud

03-10-2017

Council Directive 2006/112/EC lays down the rules applicable to the common system of value added tax (VAT). Among other issues, the Council Directive establishes a temporary VAT system based on 'the origin principle', which requires that a VAT rate applicable to transactions is determined by the Member State of the seller's location. The temporary VAT system, established by the directive was supposed to be replaced by a definitive system. This however has not happened yet despite the latest VAT system ...

Council Directive 2006/112/EC lays down the rules applicable to the common system of value added tax (VAT). Among other issues, the Council Directive establishes a temporary VAT system based on 'the origin principle', which requires that a VAT rate applicable to transactions is determined by the Member State of the seller's location. The temporary VAT system, established by the directive was supposed to be replaced by a definitive system. This however has not happened yet despite the latest VAT system having been set up approximately two decades ago. The temporary nature of the current VAT system brings several challenges, including the fact that it is more susceptible to VAT fraud. The European Parliament has called on the European Commission to update Council Directive 2006/112/EC to establish a definitive VAT system. Similarly, the Council and the European Economic and Social Committee have recommended updating the legislation. Representatives of various stakeholder groups have also meanwhile voiced concerns regarding this piece of legislation. It is expected that the European Commission will submit a legislative proposal amending this directive in October 2017.

Setting VAT rates

21-09-2017

Council Directive 2006/112/EC lays down rules applicable to the common system of value added tax (VAT). Among other issues, the Council Directive sets a framework for VAT rates. The present VAT system is based on 'the origin principle', which requires that a VAT rate applicable to transaction is determined by the Member State in which the seller is located. Various studies and reports show that presently several challenges are linked to the implementation of this directive. These challenges include ...

Council Directive 2006/112/EC lays down rules applicable to the common system of value added tax (VAT). Among other issues, the Council Directive sets a framework for VAT rates. The present VAT system is based on 'the origin principle', which requires that a VAT rate applicable to transaction is determined by the Member State in which the seller is located. Various studies and reports show that presently several challenges are linked to the implementation of this directive. These challenges include a gradual move from the origin principle to the destination principle, a need to fight VAT fraud, uncertainty for companies involved in cross-border trading, different VAT rates applied in Member States, obsolete rules, and the restrictive list of cases where reduced VAT can be applied, that is included in Annex III of the directive. The European Parliament has called on the European Commission to update Council Directive 2006/112/EC to respond to these challenges. Similarly, the Council and the European Economic and Social Committee have recommended that this legislation be updated. Furthermore, representatives of various stakeholder groups have voiced requests regarding this piece of legislation. Finally, the European Commission has expressed a willingness to take a more effective and proportionate approach to VAT rates. It is expected that the European Commission will submit this proposal in the third quarter of 2017.

Double taxation dispute resolution mechanisms in the European Union

27-06-2017

Double taxation is a consequence of countries' individual rights to impose taxes. It arises when a taxpayer's situation crosses borders, and constitutes a tax obstacle generating costs and administrative burdens. The Commission's corporate tax reform package includes a proposal aimed at remedying the shortcomings of the current mechanism. A draft legislative resolution on the proposal is on the agenda of the Parliament's July plenary session.

Double taxation is a consequence of countries' individual rights to impose taxes. It arises when a taxpayer's situation crosses borders, and constitutes a tax obstacle generating costs and administrative burdens. The Commission's corporate tax reform package includes a proposal aimed at remedying the shortcomings of the current mechanism. A draft legislative resolution on the proposal is on the agenda of the Parliament's July plenary session.

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