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Wage policy in the EU is a patchwork of different national traditions and legal frameworks. As a result, minimum wage levels diverge considerably, and leave many workers unprotected. While setting minimum wages is the competence of EU Member States, the EU has a supporting and complementary role. In October 2020, the European Commission proposed a directive seeking to improve the adequacy and increase the coverage of minimum wages, while also strengthening collective bargaining as the main instrument ...

To raise awareness of the many forms of human trafficking and to boost efforts to address them, the European Union has set 18 October as EU Anti-trafficking Day. Marking the day represents an opportunity to stress the need to tackle trafficking for the purpose of labour exploitation. On the rise, this latter has become the predominant form of trafficking in human beings in some EU Member States.

Platform work is an umbrella concept covering a heterogeneous group of economic activities completed through a digital platform. As platform workers' rights are not enshrined in EU labour law, this increasingly leads to problems related to various aspects of their work and human development. To remedy this situation, the European Commission has submitted a proposal for a directive aimed at improving the working conditions of platform workers, clarifying their employment status, and supporting the ...

This briefing follows up the commitments made by the commissioner since 2019.

Minimum wages directive

Oversigt 07-09-2022

Minimum wage protection can be provided through collective agreements, statutory minimum wages set by law, or a combination of both. The European Commission proposed a directive that seeks to promote the adequacy of statutory minimum wages, to help achieve decent working and living conditions for European workers. It is the first time that the Commission has initiated legislative action on minimum wage protection, leaving Member States to define their specific minimum wage levels. The European Parliament ...

Care work provided in homes and institutions is a public good that is under-valued by society. Care workers are more likely to have low earnings and precarious working conditions. About 9 in 10 care workers are women. Most unpaid care work within households is carried out by women. The 'unpaid care penalty' for women in the EU, which is equivalent to the earnings they lost because of this unbalanced distribution of care responsibilities, is estimated to reach €242 billion per year. EU action in the ...

This study focuses on options for regulating the use of AI enabled and algorithmic management systems in the world of work under EU law. The first part describes how these technologies are already being deployed, particularly in recruitment, staff appraisal, task distribution and disciplinary procedures. It discusses some near-term potential development prospects and presents an impact assessment, highlighting some of these technologies' most significant implications. The second part addresses the ...

Equal pay for equal work is one of the European Union's founding principles, enshrined in Article 157 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU). However, the implementation and enforcement of this principle remain a challenge. Due to a lack of pay transparency, pay discrimination often goes undetected and victims face difficulties in making a claim for redress. On 4 March 2021, the European Commission adopted a legislative proposal on binding pay transparency measures. The proposed ...

The Monthly Highlights publication provides an overview, at a glance, of the on-going work of the policy departments, including a selection of the latest and forthcoming publications, and a list of future events.

DG IPOL Policy Department for Economic, Scientific and Quality of Life Policies published the following documents to assist the Special Committee on Artificial Intelligence in a Digital Age (AIDA) in its parliamentary work.