94

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Measures to advance the realisation of the trans-European transport network: Integrated and faster project procedures

02-07-2021

With the trans-European transport network (TEN-T) policy, the European Union seeks to develop a modern, efficient and climate-friendly network covering all transport modes. Despite the TEN-T's importance for the economy and society, and despite the binding timelines and targeted financial support, it risks not being completed as planned. This is partly due to complex administrative procedures linked to permit-granting for cross-border projects as well as broader regulatory uncertainty, often resulting ...

With the trans-European transport network (TEN-T) policy, the European Union seeks to develop a modern, efficient and climate-friendly network covering all transport modes. Despite the TEN-T's importance for the economy and society, and despite the binding timelines and targeted financial support, it risks not being completed as planned. This is partly due to complex administrative procedures linked to permit-granting for cross-border projects as well as broader regulatory uncertainty, often resulting in delays and increased cost. To speed up the network's completion, the Commission has proposed regulatory measures to integrate and shorten permit-granting for projects, and facilitate public consultations and the involvement of private investors. On 8 June 2020, the Parliament and the Council agreed on a 'smart TEN-T directive', with this legal form giving Member States more flexibility. The text could not however be adopted before the finalisation of the new Connecting Europe Facility programme, as the annexes of both texts are interlinked. The Council adopted its first-reading position on the ‘smart TEN-T directive’ on 14 June 2021 and the Parliament is due to vote on it during the July plenary session. Third edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Nuclear Safety outside the EU: Proposal for a new Council regulation

02-07-2021

In the context of the multiannual financial framework (MFF) for the 2021-2027 period, the Council has adopted Council Regulation (Euratom) 2021/948 of 27 May 2021 establishing a European instrument for international nuclear safety cooperation complementing the Neighbourhood, Development and International Cooperation Instrument – Global Europe on the basis of the Treaty establishing the European Atomic Energy Community. Regulation 2021/948 complements, but is separate from, the new Global Europe Instrument ...

In the context of the multiannual financial framework (MFF) for the 2021-2027 period, the Council has adopted Council Regulation (Euratom) 2021/948 of 27 May 2021 establishing a European instrument for international nuclear safety cooperation complementing the Neighbourhood, Development and International Cooperation Instrument – Global Europe on the basis of the Treaty establishing the European Atomic Energy Community. Regulation 2021/948 complements, but is separate from, the new Global Europe Instrument. Regulation 2021/948 replaces Council Regulation (Euratom) No 237/2014 of 13 December 2013 establishing an instrument for nuclear safety cooperation (INSC). It continues to fund the important activities carried out under the previous regulation, namely to support the promotion of a high level of nuclear safety and radiation protection and the application of effective and efficient safeguards of nuclear materials in third countries, building on the activities under the Euratom Treaty. Second edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

The new European cybersecurity competence centre and network

19-05-2021

On 13 September 2017, the Commission adopted a cybersecurity package with a series of initiatives to further improve EU cyber-resilience, deterrence and defence. A year later, the Commission presented a proposal for the creation of a European cybersecurity competence centre with a related network of national coordination centres. The initiative aims to improve and strengthen the EU's cybersecurity capacity, by stimulating the European technological and industrial cybersecurity ecosystem as well as ...

On 13 September 2017, the Commission adopted a cybersecurity package with a series of initiatives to further improve EU cyber-resilience, deterrence and defence. A year later, the Commission presented a proposal for the creation of a European cybersecurity competence centre with a related network of national coordination centres. The initiative aims to improve and strengthen the EU's cybersecurity capacity, by stimulating the European technological and industrial cybersecurity ecosystem as well as coordinating and pooling necessary resources in Europe. The competence centre is supposed to become the main body that would manage EU financial resources dedicated to cybersecurity research under the two proposed programmes – Digital Europe and Horizon Europe – within the next multiannual financial framework, for 2021-2027. Within the European Parliament, the file was assigned to the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE). The report was adopted on 19 February 2019 in the ITRE committee. On 17 April 2019 the Parliament adopted its position at first reading, after two trilogue meetings, before the European elections. A new trilogue meeting took place more than a year later, on 25 June 2020, and further negotiations followed. During the fifth trilogue meeting on 11 December 2020, the negotiators of the Council and the European Parliament reached a provisional agreement. The Council adopted the legislation on 20 April 2021 at first reading. The ITRE committee adopted the draft recommendation for second reading on 26 April 2021, and it is expected that the European Parliament will adopt the text during the May 2021 plenary session.

Single Resolution Board: Accountability arrangements (9th parliamentary term)

14-04-2021

This document provides an overview of public hearings and exchange of views with the Chair of the Single Resolution Board (SRB) in the ECON Committee since July 2019. It also provides an overview of all external papers requested by the ECON Committee by a standing panel of banking experts. Lastly, the annex contains an overview of the respective legal bases for these hearings as part of the accountability framework of the SRB. For an overview of public hearings during the 8th parliamentary term, ...

This document provides an overview of public hearings and exchange of views with the Chair of the Single Resolution Board (SRB) in the ECON Committee since July 2019. It also provides an overview of all external papers requested by the ECON Committee by a standing panel of banking experts. Lastly, the annex contains an overview of the respective legal bases for these hearings as part of the accountability framework of the SRB. For an overview of public hearings during the 8th parliamentary term, please see here.

Single Supervisory Mechanism: Accountability arrangements (9th parliamentary term)

14-04-2021

This document provides an overview of public hearings and exchange of views with the Chair of the European Central Bank (ECB) Supervisory Board in the ECON Committee since July 2019. It also provides an overview of all external papers requested by the ECON Committee by a standing panel of banking experts. Lastly, the annex contains an overview of the respective legal bases for these hearings as part of the accountability framework of the Single Supervisory Mechanism (SSM). For an overview of public ...

This document provides an overview of public hearings and exchange of views with the Chair of the European Central Bank (ECB) Supervisory Board in the ECON Committee since July 2019. It also provides an overview of all external papers requested by the ECON Committee by a standing panel of banking experts. Lastly, the annex contains an overview of the respective legal bases for these hearings as part of the accountability framework of the Single Supervisory Mechanism (SSM). For an overview of public hearings during the 8th parliamentary term, please see here.

Understanding the European Committee of the Regions

17-03-2021

The European Committee of the Regions (CoR or 'the Committee') is one of two European Union (EU) advisory bodies, the other being the European Economic and Social Committee (EESC). The CoR was established by the 1992 Treaty of Maastricht, following a period when regional and local interests had been demanding greater involvement in the European decision-making process. The CoR was set up as an advisory body of the Council and the European Commission, made up of local and regional representatives, ...

The European Committee of the Regions (CoR or 'the Committee') is one of two European Union (EU) advisory bodies, the other being the European Economic and Social Committee (EESC). The CoR was established by the 1992 Treaty of Maastricht, following a period when regional and local interests had been demanding greater involvement in the European decision-making process. The CoR was set up as an advisory body of the Council and the European Commission, made up of local and regional representatives, independent in the performance of their duties. With the various Treaty changes, the CoR has managed to consolidate its position in the EU landscape, although some of its longstanding ambitions have yet to materialise – such as its recognition as a fully fledged EU institution with co-decision power over certain territorial matters. In particular, in addition to other reforms, the Treaties have increased the number of policy areas where the Council and the Commission (and since 1999, the European Parliament as well) have an obligation to consult the CoR during the legislative process, also affirming its budgetary and administrative autonomy. Significantly, the Lisbon Treaty gave the CoR the right to bring proceedings before the EU Court of Justice for infringement of the principle of subsidiarity in the fields of mandatory consultation or in the event of a breach of CoR prerogatives. Despite obvious progress over the years in terms of expanding its competences and adapting its way of work, views are divided over the CoR's influence in the EU decision-making process. Its opinions are not binding and other factors limit its impact on legislation and policy, particularly when compared with the co-legislators, Parliament and Council. Nevertheless, as the main point of confluence for subnational interests at EU level, the CoR is far from irrelevant. This briefing looks at the evolution and organisation of the European Committee of the Regions and describes its advisory work and its other activities, beyond the formal role assigned it by the Treaties.

Complementary executive capacity

15-02-2021

Against the backdrop of new and unprecedented crises and challenges, the advantages of coordinated approaches and effective cross-border responses are all the more evident, and gaining support among Europeans, as shown by recent Eurobarometer surveys. In this context, EU complementary executive capacity could be a way of meeting citizens' expectations, through complementing, without replacing, the executive capacities of the Member States. The concept of complementary EU executive capacity dovetails ...

Against the backdrop of new and unprecedented crises and challenges, the advantages of coordinated approaches and effective cross-border responses are all the more evident, and gaining support among Europeans, as shown by recent Eurobarometer surveys. In this context, EU complementary executive capacity could be a way of meeting citizens' expectations, through complementing, without replacing, the executive capacities of the Member States. The concept of complementary EU executive capacity dovetails naturally with the ongoing transformation of the EU from a legislative union to a hybrid (legislative–executive) union, as it becomes more involved in implementing law rather than purely enacting it. Essentially, the notion repackages pre-existing administrative practices in a way that facilitates their operationalisation, draws attention to new areas of potential EU executive involvement, and presents a tool for communication with citizens that can be understood.

Coronavirus: Uncertainty and discontent [What Think Tanks are thinking]

04-02-2021

As the latest wave of the coronavirus pandemic intensifies and some highly infectious new mutations of the virus spread, a growing number of countries have increased restrictions on travel and some lockdowns have been intensified. Whilst a series of vaccines are progressively gaining official approval, and their roll-out has started, pharmaceutical companies struggle with production capacity issues, the effectiveness of the vaccines on mutations is still uncertain, and a broader debate is opening ...

As the latest wave of the coronavirus pandemic intensifies and some highly infectious new mutations of the virus spread, a growing number of countries have increased restrictions on travel and some lockdowns have been intensified. Whilst a series of vaccines are progressively gaining official approval, and their roll-out has started, pharmaceutical companies struggle with production capacity issues, the effectiveness of the vaccines on mutations is still uncertain, and a broader debate is opening up on the global fairness of vaccine distribution beyond the ‘first’ world. This note offers links to recent commentaries, studies and reports from international think tanks on the coronavirus and related issues. More studies on the topics can be found in a previous edition in this series, published in December 2020.

Japan's Parliament and other political institutions

15-12-2020

Japan is a constitutional monarchy, with a parliamentary system of government based on the separation of powers. The Emperor is the symbol of the state and does not hold political functions, only performing ceremonial duties. Nevertheless, he can play a relevant diplomatic role. With Emperor Naruhito's enthronement in 2019, following his father's abdication, Japan has entered the Reiwa (beautiful harmony) age. The 2001 administrative reform strengthened the Prime Minister's leadership in the cabinet ...

Japan is a constitutional monarchy, with a parliamentary system of government based on the separation of powers. The Emperor is the symbol of the state and does not hold political functions, only performing ceremonial duties. Nevertheless, he can play a relevant diplomatic role. With Emperor Naruhito's enthronement in 2019, following his father's abdication, Japan has entered the Reiwa (beautiful harmony) age. The 2001 administrative reform strengthened the Prime Minister's leadership in the cabinet. The Chief Cabinet Secretary also plays a relevant role. Suga Yoshihide, leader of the Liberal-Democratic Party, is the country's Prime Minister, succeeding Abe Shinzō, Japan's longest-serving prime minister, in 2020. The Supreme Court is at the top of the judicial system. It is not a constitutional court, despite handling appeals arising from actual disputes. The appointment of its Justices is reviewed by the people at the first general election of the Lower House following their appointment. Japan is a unitary state divided into 47 prefectures. A Metropolitan Government administers the capital, Tokyo. Japan's 1947 Constitution recognises 'local self-government.' Local governments carry out many of the national policies and programmes. They have limited autonomy, also because of their dependence on financial resources from the central government. Japan has a bicameral parliament − the Diet. Although the two chambers share legislative powers, the Lower House (House of Representatives) prevails in the legislative process and is empowered to adopt the final decision on the budget and on the approval of international treaties. Changes in the regional geopolitical environment and in the country's demographic structure have prompted debates on issues such as the revision of the 'pacifist' Article 9 of the Constitution and the seat distribution among electoral constituencies. This is an update of a briefing published in June 2020.

Update on recent banking developments

09-12-2020

This briefing gives an update on and summarises recent events and developments in the Banking Union, based on publicly available information. It gives an overview of: 1) the Eurogroup agreement on the backstop to the Single Resolution Fund; 2) the 7th monitoring report on risk reduction indicators; 3) recent European Central Bank publications, namely the Financial Stability Review and guidance on climate- related and environmental risks; 4) recent Single Resolution Board publications, specifically ...

This briefing gives an update on and summarises recent events and developments in the Banking Union, based on publicly available information. It gives an overview of: 1) the Eurogroup agreement on the backstop to the Single Resolution Fund; 2) the 7th monitoring report on risk reduction indicators; 3) recent European Central Bank publications, namely the Financial Stability Review and guidance on climate- related and environmental risks; 4) recent Single Resolution Board publications, specifically its 2021 Work Programme and guidance on bank mergers and acquisitions; and 5) the EBA’s benchmarking exercise of national insolvency regimes.

Kommende begivenheder

25-10-2021
European Gender Equality Week - October 25-28, 2021
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FEMM AFET DROI SEDE DEVE BUDG CONT ECON EMPL ITRE TRAN AGRI PECH CULT JURI PETI
25-10-2021
Capacity for proper expenditure controls of the increased budget of the MFF and NGEU
Høring -
CONT
25-10-2021
Ninth meeting of the Joint Parliamentary Scrutiny Group on Europol, 25-26 October
Anden begivenhed -
LIBE

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