104

resultat(er)

Ord
Type af publikation
Politikområde
Forfatter
Dato

EU Anti-fraud programme 2021-2027

21-04-2021

In 2018, the Commission proposed a regulation aimed at establishing the European Union's anti-fraud programme for the duration of the 2021-2027 Multiannual Financial Framework. It will support Member States' efforts to combat fraud, corruption and other illegal activities affecting the financial interests of the European Union. The financial envelope for the implementation of the programme for 2021 to 2027 will amount to €181.2 million (current prices). An early second-reading agreement was reached ...

In 2018, the Commission proposed a regulation aimed at establishing the European Union's anti-fraud programme for the duration of the 2021-2027 Multiannual Financial Framework. It will support Member States' efforts to combat fraud, corruption and other illegal activities affecting the financial interests of the European Union. The financial envelope for the implementation of the programme for 2021 to 2027 will amount to €181.2 million (current prices). An early second-reading agreement was reached with the Council in trilogue negotiations, which is now due to be voted by Parliament during the April 2021 session.

Advances in administrative cooperation in the field of taxation

08-04-2021

The digitalisation of the economy opens the door to new cross-border economic activities that makes it possible to under-report income and under-pay tax. It also presents new challenges for tax administrations, already faced with limited access to information at the national level. Hence, in July 2020 the Commission proposed to amend the provisions on information exchange and administrative cooperation and to include the automatic exchange of data on information declared by digital platform operators ...

The digitalisation of the economy opens the door to new cross-border economic activities that makes it possible to under-report income and under-pay tax. It also presents new challenges for tax administrations, already faced with limited access to information at the national level. Hence, in July 2020 the Commission proposed to amend the provisions on information exchange and administrative cooperation and to include the automatic exchange of data on information declared by digital platform operators in their scope. The goal is to ensure that sellers on digital platforms pay their fair share of taxes, align EU countries to the digital economy, and close the gaps for tax evasion and avoidance. Right now, having secure tax revenues is vital for the provision of support to the people and businesses most in need. The Parliament's ECON committee adopted its report on the proposal for an amended Directive on Administrative Cooperation (DAC7) on 4 February 2021. The Parliament adopted its opinion on the Commission’s proposal on 10 March 2021. The Council had reached agreement on the proposal on 1 December 2020, and formally adopted it on 22 March 2021. Member States have to transpose the directive's provisions and apply them as of 1 January 2023, except for the provisions on joint audits which will apply from 2024.

Establishing an EU single window for customs

12-02-2021

The IA underpinning the proposal to establish a single window environment for customs is well structured, substantiated and clear. It acknowledges a scarcity of comparable EU-wide data, and is transparent on the assumptions underlying the analysis. The presentation, screening and assessment of the retained policy options is clear and balanced, assessing their direct economic impacts, as well as their social and environmental implications. The selection of the preferred options is based on cost-effectiveness ...

The IA underpinning the proposal to establish a single window environment for customs is well structured, substantiated and clear. It acknowledges a scarcity of comparable EU-wide data, and is transparent on the assumptions underlying the analysis. The presentation, screening and assessment of the retained policy options is clear and balanced, assessing their direct economic impacts, as well as their social and environmental implications. The selection of the preferred options is based on cost-effectiveness and qualitative analyses, expecting significant net benefits from interconnecting authorities responsible for non-customs formalities laid down in EU legislation to existing national single window environments, which in turn, are harmonised to achieve a level playing field for economic operators, in particular SMEs. Social and environmental benefits derive from better digital administrative cooperation, the reduction of fraud and better compliance with EU regulatory requirements.

The role of Points of Single Contact (PSCs) and other information services in the Single Market (At A Glance - Study In Focus)

09-11-2020

This At A Glance summarises the key findings of the original study, which analysed the role and development of Points of Single Contact and other information services. The study reviewed recent policy documents, and identified a range of weaknesses for the provision of contact points. The main recommendations were to improve monitoring (using the indicators and the Single Market Scoreboard) and make use of infringement proceedings in case of non-compliance. The actions could be built on the instruments ...

This At A Glance summarises the key findings of the original study, which analysed the role and development of Points of Single Contact and other information services. The study reviewed recent policy documents, and identified a range of weaknesses for the provision of contact points. The main recommendations were to improve monitoring (using the indicators and the Single Market Scoreboard) and make use of infringement proceedings in case of non-compliance. The actions could be built on the instruments available under the recent Single Digital Gateway Regulation. This document was provided by the Policy Department for Economic, Scientific and Quality of Life Policies at the request of the committee on Internal Market and Consumer Protection (IMCO).

Ekstern forfatter

Pau SALSAS-FORN et al.

Single market information tool (SMIT)

30-09-2020

Competition and consumer protection in the single market are often undermined by price discrimination based on residency. While many market players do not cooperate with the Commission, for instance not disclosing their pricing structure, Member States often do not have the means or the tools to collect and deliver the required information to the Commission. The SMIT proposal would provide the Commission with powers such as to request business-related information (e.g. cost structure or product volumes ...

Competition and consumer protection in the single market are often undermined by price discrimination based on residency. While many market players do not cooperate with the Commission, for instance not disclosing their pricing structure, Member States often do not have the means or the tools to collect and deliver the required information to the Commission. The SMIT proposal would provide the Commission with powers such as to request business-related information (e.g. cost structure or product volumes sold), and to address market failures in a more efficient way. The SMIT, however, has raised some criticism in the Council and EP, inter alia, because of the Commission’s choice of the legal basis for the proposal. Parliament’s Legal Service stated in an opinion that the correct legal basis for the Commission proposal is Article 337 TFEU: a legal basis which gives no legislative role for the EP. On 12 July 2018, the IMCO committee adopted a report which would amend the proposal’s legal basis. The JURI committee subsequently adopted an opinion stating that the Commission proposal goes beyond the powers available under the proposed revised legal basis. The report was initially due to be voted in plenary in October 2018, but was taken off the agenda. As the parliamentary term has concluded, the report has now lapsed. The European Commission withdrew this legislative proposal on 29 September 2020. The procedure has thus ended.

Access to the occupation of road transport operator and to the international road haulage market

07-07-2020

The regulations on admission to the occupation of road transport operator and on access to the international road transport market have been contributing to the functioning of EU road transport and fairer competition between resident and non-resident hauliers since December 2011. Despite the improvements they have brought to the sector, persistent shortcomings such as diverging national application of the rules and uneven enforcement called for a revision of both acts. On 31 May 2017, as part of ...

The regulations on admission to the occupation of road transport operator and on access to the international road transport market have been contributing to the functioning of EU road transport and fairer competition between resident and non-resident hauliers since December 2011. Despite the improvements they have brought to the sector, persistent shortcomings such as diverging national application of the rules and uneven enforcement called for a revision of both acts. On 31 May 2017, as part of a 'mobility package', the European Commission adopted a new proposal to address the main shortcomings affecting the sector, and improve its competitiveness and efficiency. In June 2018, Parliament's Committee on Transport and Tourism (TRAN) adopted its report. After further debates and procedural developments, Parliament adopted its first-reading position on 4 April 2019. The Council, on its side, reached a general approach on this proposal in December 2018, under the Austrian Presidency. After four negotiating rounds, the Council and Parliament reached a provisional agreement on the proposal on 12 December 2019, which was approved by Coreper on 20 December. The Council formally adopted its first-reading position on 7 April 2020, and the TRAN committee recommended on 8 June that Parliament approve it at second reading. The agreed text is thus due to be voted in plenary in July at second reading. If adopted, this would put an end to three years of debate on a complex and controversial proposal. Sixth edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Foresight within the EU institutions: The ESPAS process so far

20-05-2020

The European Strategy and Policy Analysis System (ESPAS) brings together the various European Union (EU) institutions and bodies in a process of administrative-level cooperation designed to identify and analyse the medium- and long-term trends facing the European Union and their implications for policy-makers. This dialogue was established in the early 2010s as a means of promoting longer-term thinking in the EU policy process and encouraging the Union’s various institutions to cooperate more closely ...

The European Strategy and Policy Analysis System (ESPAS) brings together the various European Union (EU) institutions and bodies in a process of administrative-level cooperation designed to identify and analyse the medium- and long-term trends facing the European Union and their implications for policy-makers. This dialogue was established in the early 2010s as a means of promoting longer-term thinking in the EU policy process and encouraging the Union’s various institutions to cooperate more closely in this field. This EPRS Briefing traces the origins of the ESPAS process and describes its operation to date, with the digital version of the Briefing offering links to some of its key output since 2012. A parallel Briefing will compare and contrast the three Global Trends Reports produced by the ESPAS process, in 2012, 2015 and 2019.

European maritime single window: Harmonised digital reporting for ships

26-08-2019

Every time a ship calls at a port, its maritime transport operator has to submit a set of pre-arrival information to a range of entities and agencies. Currently, the reporting process is not harmonised across EU ports. In addition, the information provided by ships is not efficiently shared among the actors concerned. The resulting multiple reporting places an excessive administrative burden on shipping operators, with negative impacts rippling down the logistics chain. Within broader efforts to ...

Every time a ship calls at a port, its maritime transport operator has to submit a set of pre-arrival information to a range of entities and agencies. Currently, the reporting process is not harmonised across EU ports. In addition, the information provided by ships is not efficiently shared among the actors concerned. The resulting multiple reporting places an excessive administrative burden on shipping operators, with negative impacts rippling down the logistics chain. Within broader efforts to modernise EU transport, the European Commission is proposing to bring all the reporting linked to a port call together into one digital space – the 'European Maritime Single Window', to harmonise reporting procedures for shipping operators and to ensure data can be shared and reused efficiently. Interinstitutional negotiations concluded on 7 February, the agreed text was adopted by the Parliament in plenary on 18 April and by Council on 13 June 2019. After publication in the Official Journal, the new regulation entered into force on 14 August 2019, while the measures within it will apply from 15 August 2025. Third edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Mutual recognition of goods

25-04-2019

The revision of the regulation on mutual recognition of goods was announced in the 2015 Single Market Strategy. The Commission adopted its proposal in December 2017, which aimed to revise previous rules dating from 2008. This regulation aims to improve the rules governing the trade of goods in the single market. Intra-EU trade remains twice as big as extra-EU trade, and is rising constantly. This is, in large part, due to free movement of goods in the EU, which is based on either harmonised product ...

The revision of the regulation on mutual recognition of goods was announced in the 2015 Single Market Strategy. The Commission adopted its proposal in December 2017, which aimed to revise previous rules dating from 2008. This regulation aims to improve the rules governing the trade of goods in the single market. Intra-EU trade remains twice as big as extra-EU trade, and is rising constantly. This is, in large part, due to free movement of goods in the EU, which is based on either harmonised product rules at the EU level or, where there are no harmonised rules, the principle of mutual recognition under which goods lawfully marketed in one Member State may be sold in another Member State. The proposal addressed a number of shortcomings in the application of the mutual recognition principle. A provisional agreement between the co-legislators was reached on 22 November 2018. The text was adopted in plenary in February 2019. The new rules will improve collaboration among national authoritites and enhance the role of national product contact points. They will introduce a faster problem-solving procedure for disputes between companies and national authorities, as well as a new voluntary declaration to be filled in by economic operators to prove lawful marketing in an EU Member State. The new rules will apply from 19 April 2020. Fourth edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. Please note this document has been designed for on-line viewing.

Revision of the Visa Code

10-04-2019

In March 2018, the European Commission submitted a proposal to revise the Community Code on Visas (the Visa Code). The proposal's main objective is to strengthen the common visa policy while taking into account migration and security concerns, through increasing the role of visa policy in the EU's cooperation with third countries. Economic considerations will also come into play, with the facilitation of visa processing for legitimate travellers who contribute to the EU's economy and its cultural ...

In March 2018, the European Commission submitted a proposal to revise the Community Code on Visas (the Visa Code). The proposal's main objective is to strengthen the common visa policy while taking into account migration and security concerns, through increasing the role of visa policy in the EU's cooperation with third countries. Economic considerations will also come into play, with the facilitation of visa processing for legitimate travellers who contribute to the EU's economy and its cultural and social development. The agreement on the proposal, reached after trilogue negotiations, now needs to be confirmed by Parliament, with a vote expected during the April II plenary session.

Kommende begivenheder

21-09-2021
EPRS online Book Talk with David Harley: Inside the room - Shaping Europe, 1992-2010
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Putting the 'e' in e-health
Workshop -
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27-09-2021
Turning the tide on cancer: the national parliaments' view on Europe's Cancer Plan
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