8

resultat(er)

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Type af publikation
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Dato

From Bratislava to Rome: The European Council’s role in shaping a common future for EU-27

18-04-2017

The Rome Declaration of 25 March 2017, issued by the Heads of State or Government of the EU-27 on the occasion of the 60th anniversary of the Treaties of Rome, marked the end of a process that started after the UK referendum on EU membership on 23 June 2016. The aim of this In-depth Analysis is to assess the outcomes of the various EU-27 and European Council meetings in the period between the Bratislava summit of 16 September 2016 and the Rome summit of 25 March 2017, in relation to the objectives ...

The Rome Declaration of 25 March 2017, issued by the Heads of State or Government of the EU-27 on the occasion of the 60th anniversary of the Treaties of Rome, marked the end of a process that started after the UK referendum on EU membership on 23 June 2016. The aim of this In-depth Analysis is to assess the outcomes of the various EU-27 and European Council meetings in the period between the Bratislava summit of 16 September 2016 and the Rome summit of 25 March 2017, in relation to the objectives laid out in the Bratislava Declaration and Roadmap. The analysis shows that substantial progress has been made on the Bratislava commitments for all three policy priorities listed – migration, security, and the economy. It also reflects on how the Rome Declaration and Bratislava process were shaped by the overall context of the growing concerns of EU citizens and their attitude towards the EU and demonstrates how the views of the different EU institutions and the various Member States have converged during this process, leading to a consensual Rome Declaration.

The Written Statement Directive

04-04-2017

The Written Statement Directive obliges employers to provide employees with a written statement on the essential aspects of the work contract or employment relationship. Despite the fact that the directive was transposed into the legal systems of all Member States, the reports show several cases of its incorrect or inadequate implementation. Furthermore, new forms of employment have emerged since the directive's adoption in 1991, which it does not cover. Court of Justice jurisprudence clarifying ...

The Written Statement Directive obliges employers to provide employees with a written statement on the essential aspects of the work contract or employment relationship. Despite the fact that the directive was transposed into the legal systems of all Member States, the reports show several cases of its incorrect or inadequate implementation. Furthermore, new forms of employment have emerged since the directive's adoption in 1991, which it does not cover. Court of Justice jurisprudence clarifying several of the directive's provisions has to be taken into account as well. The European Parliament has called on the European Commission to update the Written Statement Directive so that it would react to these challenges. Similarly, the EESC has recommended that the existing legislation be updated. Furthermore, the representatives of various stakeholder groups have voiced requests to update this piece of EU legislation. Last, but not least, the European Commission itself has expressed the willingness to revise the Written Statement Directive as part of the REFIT exercise. It is expected that the Commission will submit this proposal on 26 April 2017.

The Juncker Commission's ten priorities: State of play in mid-2016

23-05-2016

This publication provides an overview of the work done by the European Commission under the first two work programmes of Jean-Claude Juncker's presidency, and more specifically of the initiatives it has taken in the framework of its ten priority areas for actions. It draws on a wide range of publications by EPRS, and builds, in particular, on the briefing 'The ten priorities of the Juncker Commission: State of play a year on', by Ariane Debyser. It has been compiled by Desislava Boyadjieva with contributions ...

This publication provides an overview of the work done by the European Commission under the first two work programmes of Jean-Claude Juncker's presidency, and more specifically of the initiatives it has taken in the framework of its ten priority areas for actions. It draws on a wide range of publications by EPRS, and builds, in particular, on the briefing 'The ten priorities of the Juncker Commission: State of play a year on', by Ariane Debyser. It has been compiled by Desislava Boyadjieva with contributions from authors across EPRS – Piotr Bakowski, Angelos Delivorias, Gregor Erbach, Stephan Huber, Elena Lazarou, Anita Orav, Eva-Maria Poptcheva, Laura Puccio, Christian Scheinert, Andrej Stuchlik, Marcin Szczepanski, Laura Tilindyte, Sofija Voronova and Astrid Worum – as well as colleagues from the Office of the Deputy Secretary-General. Graphics are by Eulalia Claros, Christian Dietrich and Giulio Sabbati. As the European Commission under its President Jean-Claude Juncker begins the preparation of its 2017 work programme, this publication seeks to provide an overview of the work already done since the Commission took office in each of its 10 priority areas. Moreover, as this Commission approaches the midway point of its second annual work programme, it is of growing interest to assess progress towards the targets that the Commission has set itself, and to identify areas in which difficulties in making progress have been encountered.

The ten priorities of the Juncker Commission: State of play a year on

04-09-2015

Before his election to office in July 2014, the incoming President of the European Commission, Jean-Claude Juncker, set out ten policy priorities which would serve as the political mandate for his five-year term in office. With the stated aim of focusing on the 'big things', he outlined ten priority areas in which he wanted the EU to make a difference and deliver concrete results for citizens. The Commission Work Programme for 2015 was based on these guidelines, and on putting these priorities into ...

Before his election to office in July 2014, the incoming President of the European Commission, Jean-Claude Juncker, set out ten policy priorities which would serve as the political mandate for his five-year term in office. With the stated aim of focusing on the 'big things', he outlined ten priority areas in which he wanted the EU to make a difference and deliver concrete results for citizens. The Commission Work Programme for 2015 was based on these guidelines, and on putting these priorities into practice. Ahead of President Juncker's 'State of the Union' address, to be delivered at the EP plenary session on 9 September 2015, this briefing outlines the principal initiatives taken by the Commission since coming into office, under each of the ten policy areas: 1. A new boost for jobs, growth and investment 2. A connected digital single market 3. A resilient Energy Union with a forward-looking climate change policy 4. A deeper and fairer internal market with a strengthened industrial base 5. A deeper and fairer Economic and Monetary Union (EMU) 6. A reasonable and balanced free trade agreement with the United States 7. An area of Justice and Fundamental Rights based on mutual trust 8. Towards a new policy on migration 9. Europe as a stronger global actor 10. A Union of democratic change. Among major developments are the adoption of a Regulation on the European Fund for Strategic Investment, which is a key component of the Investment Plan for Europe, and the presentation by the Commission of framework strategies in several major policy fields (for example, Digital Single Market, energy, internal security, migration). The Commission has also made proposals in the area of better regulation, covering the entire policy cycle, aiming to improve the transparency and quality of EU law-making. While key initiatives of the Work Programme remain to be presented in the second half of the year (notably an action plan on Capital Markets Union, and a labour-market mobility package), the Commission has also been confronted with other major developments influencing the political agenda. On EMU, while progress was made with the adoption of the 'Five Presidents' Report', the agenda has been dominated by the Greek debt situation, while in the field of migration, the EU is currently confronted with an escalating crisis, which has prompted calls for a stronger and more concerted European response.

Establishing Free Zones for regional development

12-03-2013

Free Zones are geographic areas in which a governmental authority offers incentives, different from the host country's regular policies, to companies operating in the region. Given the nature of these incentives, designated zones are often said to function as "growth poles" for the region, or even beyond.

Free Zones are geographic areas in which a governmental authority offers incentives, different from the host country's regular policies, to companies operating in the region. Given the nature of these incentives, designated zones are often said to function as "growth poles" for the region, or even beyond.

An Assessment of the European Semester

17-09-2012

This study assesses the European Semester’s effectiveness and legitimacy. Effectiveness is constrained by the fact that spillovers, in particular in the euro area, are insufficiently accounted for and recommendations lack prioritisation across countries and policy areas. Legitimacy derives from the Council vote. We provide evidence based on a survey sent to all 27 National Parliaments, which are found to be active in debating central elements of the Semester and thereby providing national legitimacy ...

This study assesses the European Semester’s effectiveness and legitimacy. Effectiveness is constrained by the fact that spillovers, in particular in the euro area, are insufficiently accounted for and recommendations lack prioritisation across countries and policy areas. Legitimacy derives from the Council vote. We provide evidence based on a survey sent to all 27 National Parliaments, which are found to be active in debating central elements of the Semester and thereby providing national legitimacy. The role of the European Parliament was strengthened with the Six-pack's introduction of an Economic Dialogue. We propose a non-binding vote by the European Parliament on the Annual Growth Survey and on final recommendations. For euro area countries, only MEPs of these countries should vote. Currently discussed steps towards a banking, fiscal and political union may require Treaty changes, which would provide greater legitimacy at the EU level.

Ekstern forfatter

Mark HALLERBERG (Bruegel, Hertie School of Governance), Benedicta MARZINOTTO (Bruegel) and Guntram B. WOLFF (Bruegel) , Research Assistants : Dana ANDREICUT, Lucia GRANELLI, Francesco NICOLI and Philine SCHUSEIL

The CAP in the Multiannual Financial Framework 2014/2020

14-10-2011

This is the third working paper written by Policy Department B on Common Agricultural Policy Reform. The purpose of this document is to provide an analysis of the Commission’s Communication on “A Budget for Europe 2020”, with the aim of facilitating the legislative work of the MEPs relating to the next reform of the CAP. After a description of the historical evolution of the European budget and spending on the Common Agricultural Policy, the paper explores the new proposed Multiannual Financial Framework ...

This is the third working paper written by Policy Department B on Common Agricultural Policy Reform. The purpose of this document is to provide an analysis of the Commission’s Communication on “A Budget for Europe 2020”, with the aim of facilitating the legislative work of the MEPs relating to the next reform of the CAP. After a description of the historical evolution of the European budget and spending on the Common Agricultural Policy, the paper explores the new proposed Multiannual Financial Framework for the 2014–2020 period, with particular reference to the CAP budget and its various components.

The EU strategy for the Baltic Sea Region

08-09-2010

The EU Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region (SBSR), adopted by the Council in October 2009, is the first EU macro-region initiative for sustainable development. The SBSR has the general aims of making the region more environmentally sustainable, more prosperous, more accessible and attractive, as well as safer and more secure. The Baltic Sea Region encompasses eight Member States and faces significant challenges in the shipping, fisheries and energy sectors, which are directly or indirectly targeted ...

The EU Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region (SBSR), adopted by the Council in October 2009, is the first EU macro-region initiative for sustainable development. The SBSR has the general aims of making the region more environmentally sustainable, more prosperous, more accessible and attractive, as well as safer and more secure. The Baltic Sea Region encompasses eight Member States and faces significant challenges in the shipping, fisheries and energy sectors, which are directly or indirectly targeted by the SBSR. An Action Plan for the SBSR, with proposed actions and flagship projects, was prepared following consultation with Member States and stakeholders. Its implementation is in turn dependent on further collaboration. The SBSR does not imply any additional funding, with the transnational cooperation funds of the 2007-13 cohesion policy being the main tool. The EP has welcomed the SBSR and highlighted its contribution to improving the diversification of the region's energy production and supply.

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