42

resultat(er)

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Directive on security of network and information systems (NIS Directive)

10-11-2020

Directive on security of network and information systems across the Union (Directive (EU) 2016/1148, NIS Directive) is the first horizontal EU cybersecurity legal act, which will be reviewed in 2020 with the aim to increase cybersecurity in the EU. The NIS Directive entered into force in August 2016 and Members States transposed it into national laws by 9 May 2018. The NIS Directive was designed to improve Member States' cybersecurity capabilities; the cooperation between Member States; and Member ...

Directive on security of network and information systems across the Union (Directive (EU) 2016/1148, NIS Directive) is the first horizontal EU cybersecurity legal act, which will be reviewed in 2020 with the aim to increase cybersecurity in the EU. The NIS Directive entered into force in August 2016 and Members States transposed it into national laws by 9 May 2018. The NIS Directive was designed to improve Member States' cybersecurity capabilities; the cooperation between Member States; and Member States' supervision of critical sectors. The Directive established a culture of risk management and incident reporting among key economic actors - operators providing essential services (OES) and Digital Service Providers (DSPs). The Directive also set out cooperation mechanisms, such as the NIS Cooperation Group and the network of national computer security incident response teams (CSIRTs).

Public hearing with Andrea Enria, Chair of the ECB Supervisory Board

26-10-2020

This note is prepared in view of a regular public hearing with the Chair of the Supervisory Board of the European Central Bank (ECB), Andrea Enria, which will take place on 27 October 2020. The briefing addresses (i) recent supervisory measures in response to the COVID-19 crisis, including an overview of the ECB’s COVID-19 vulnerability analysis and a discussion on the effectiveness of certain capital relief measures; (ii) the SSM’s response to the European Parliament’s 2019 Banking Union Report ...

This note is prepared in view of a regular public hearing with the Chair of the Supervisory Board of the European Central Bank (ECB), Andrea Enria, which will take place on 27 October 2020. The briefing addresses (i) recent supervisory measures in response to the COVID-19 crisis, including an overview of the ECB’s COVID-19 vulnerability analysis and a discussion on the effectiveness of certain capital relief measures; (ii) the SSM’s response to the European Parliament’s 2019 Banking Union Report; (iii) short-term risks for the banking sector (low profitability, NPLs and Brexit); (iv) longer-term challenges, including consolidation in the banking sector and completing the Banking Union; and (v) supervisory issues, namely anti-money laundering and addressing cyber and IT risks.

Regulating digital finance

30-09-2020

The use of new technologies to enable and enhance the activities of the financial sector has the potential to provide significant benefits, including efficiency gains, cost reductions, improved data management and transparency. At the same time, it entails risks in fields such as financial stability, financial crime and consumer protection. These risks may further increase due to the fragmented regulatory landscape in the EU, and uneven global developments in regulating the sector. There is therefore ...

The use of new technologies to enable and enhance the activities of the financial sector has the potential to provide significant benefits, including efficiency gains, cost reductions, improved data management and transparency. At the same time, it entails risks in fields such as financial stability, financial crime and consumer protection. These risks may further increase due to the fragmented regulatory landscape in the EU, and uneven global developments in regulating the sector. There is therefore a need for the EU to create a comprehensive and stable regulatory framework in this area. Parliament is expected to debate a legislative-initiative report with recommendations to the European Commission to act in this area during its October I plenary session.

EU cyber sanctions: Moving beyond words

25-09-2020

The EU recognises that cybersecurity and cyber-defence are critical for its prosperity, security and global ambitions. Offensive cyber-attacks by malicious actors show no sign of slowing down (not even during the coronavirus pandemic) and thus require concrete dissuasive measures. In July 2020, the EU Member States decided for the first time to use the 'teeth' rooted in the EU cyber-diplomacy framework and to 'bite cyber perpetrators back' by placing sanctions on them. This precedent has helped reinforce ...

The EU recognises that cybersecurity and cyber-defence are critical for its prosperity, security and global ambitions. Offensive cyber-attacks by malicious actors show no sign of slowing down (not even during the coronavirus pandemic) and thus require concrete dissuasive measures. In July 2020, the EU Member States decided for the first time to use the 'teeth' rooted in the EU cyber-diplomacy framework and to 'bite cyber perpetrators back' by placing sanctions on them. This precedent has helped reinforce the EU's cyber policy action.

Foreign interference in democracies: Understanding the threat, and evolving responses

22-09-2020

Across the world, democratic societies, institutions, processes and values are under increasing external and internal attack. The coronavirus crisis has, meanwhile, exacerbated the systemic struggle between democracy and authoritarianism, prompting authoritarian state and non-state actors to deploy a broad range of overt and covert instruments in their bid to destabilise their democratic counterparts. Against this backdrop, and following a string of examples of hostile meddling by authoritarian actors ...

Across the world, democratic societies, institutions, processes and values are under increasing external and internal attack. The coronavirus crisis has, meanwhile, exacerbated the systemic struggle between democracy and authoritarianism, prompting authoritarian state and non-state actors to deploy a broad range of overt and covert instruments in their bid to destabilise their democratic counterparts. Against this backdrop, and following a string of examples of hostile meddling by authoritarian actors to undermine democratic governing processes in countries such as Ukraine, the United Kingdom, the United States (US), Canada and Australia, the focus on foreign interference continues to sharpen. Among the EU's institutions, the European Parliament − arguably the flagship of European democracy − is pushing the policy response to foreign interference to the top of the political agenda. Among other initiatives and actions, in October 2019 it passed a resolution on countering foreign interference and has set up a special committee on foreign interference, whose constituent meeting is scheduled to take place in September 2020.

The new European cybersecurity competence centre and network

24-07-2020

On 13 September 2017, the Commission adopted a cybersecurity package containing a series of initiatives to further improve EU cyber-resilience, deterrence and defence. A year later, the Commission presented a proposal for the creation of a European cybersecurity competence centre with a related network of national coordination centres. The initiative aims to improve and strengthen the EU's cybersecurity capacity, by stimulating the European technological and industrial cybersecurity ecosystem as ...

On 13 September 2017, the Commission adopted a cybersecurity package containing a series of initiatives to further improve EU cyber-resilience, deterrence and defence. A year later, the Commission presented a proposal for the creation of a European cybersecurity competence centre with a related network of national coordination centres. The initiative aims to improve and strengthen the EU's cybersecurity capacity, by stimulating the European technological and industrial cybersecurity ecosystem as well as coordinating and pooling necessary resources in Europe. The competence centre is supposed to become the main body that would manage EU financial resources dedicated to cybersecurity research under the two proposed programmes – Digital Europe and Horizon Europe – within the next multiannual financial framework, for 2021-2027. Within the European Parliament, the file was assigned to the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE). The report was adopted on 19 February 2019 in the ITRE committee and voted by Parliament during the March I 2019 plenary. Although trilogue negotiations took place in March 2019, given the short timeframe until the end of the legislative term no agreement could be reached, and Parliament then adopted its first-reading position ahead of the May 2019 elections. A third trilogue meeting took place more than a year later, on 25 June 2020, and further negotiations are planned for September 2020. Third edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Digital sovereignty for Europe

02-07-2020

There is growing concern that the citizens, businesses and Member States of the European Union (EU) are gradually losing control over their data, over their capacity for innovation, and over their ability to shape and enforce legislation in the digital environment. Against this background, support has been growing for a new policy approach designed to enhance Europe's strategic autonomy in the digital field. This would require the Union to update and adapt a number of its current legal, regulatory ...

There is growing concern that the citizens, businesses and Member States of the European Union (EU) are gradually losing control over their data, over their capacity for innovation, and over their ability to shape and enforce legislation in the digital environment. Against this background, support has been growing for a new policy approach designed to enhance Europe's strategic autonomy in the digital field. This would require the Union to update and adapt a number of its current legal, regulatory and financial instruments, and to promote more actively European values and principles in areas such as data protection, cybersecurity and ethically designed artificial intelligence (AI). This paper explains the context of the emerging quest for 'digital sovereignty', which the coronavirus pandemic now seems to have accelerated, and provides an overview of the measures currently being discussed and/or proposed to enhance European autonomy in the digital field.

Outcome of EU-China video-summit of 22 June 2020

30-06-2020

On 22 June 2020, the EU and China held their 22nd summit by videoconference. It was the occasion for the EU and Chinese leadership to touch upon a wide range of dimensions of the both strategic and challenging bilateral relationship. Topics included trade, climate change, international peace and security, Hong Kong and human rights as well as the response to the coronavirus outbreak. Yet, no joint statement was adopted as further progress would require ‘reciprocity and trust’. China is for the EU ...

On 22 June 2020, the EU and China held their 22nd summit by videoconference. It was the occasion for the EU and Chinese leadership to touch upon a wide range of dimensions of the both strategic and challenging bilateral relationship. Topics included trade, climate change, international peace and security, Hong Kong and human rights as well as the response to the coronavirus outbreak. Yet, no joint statement was adopted as further progress would require ‘reciprocity and trust’. China is for the EU both a partner committed to multilateralism, on which it nevertheless pursues in its own path, and a competitor, using assertively different economic and trade tools such as state subsidies or foreign direct investments to gain market share.

The impact of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) on artificial intelligence

25-06-2020

This study addresses the relation between the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and artificial intelligence (AI). It considers challenges and opportunities for individuals and society, and the ways in which risks can be countered and opportunities enabled through law and technology. The study discusses the tensions and proximities between AI and data protection principles, such as in particular purpose limitation and data minimisation. It makes a thorough analysis of automated decision-making ...

This study addresses the relation between the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and artificial intelligence (AI). It considers challenges and opportunities for individuals and society, and the ways in which risks can be countered and opportunities enabled through law and technology. The study discusses the tensions and proximities between AI and data protection principles, such as in particular purpose limitation and data minimisation. It makes a thorough analysis of automated decision-making, considering the extent to which it is admissible, the safeguard measures to be adopted, and whether data subjects have a right to individual explanations. The study then considers the extent to which the GDPR provides for a preventive risk-based approach, focused on data protection by design and by default.

Ekstern forfatter

DG, EPRS_The study was led by Professor Giovanni Sartor, European University Institute of Florence, at the request of the Panel for the Future of Science and Technology (STOA) and managed by the Scientific Foresight Unit, within the Directorate-General for Parliamentary Research Services (EPRS) of the Secretariat of the European Parliament. It was co-authored by Professor Sartor and Dr Francesca Lagioia, European University Institute of Florence, working under his supervision.

Foreign policy consequences of coronavirus

11-06-2020

The Covid-19 crisis has had economic, social, political and geopolitical consequences that will inevitably affect key aspects of EU foreign policy. These include relations with major powers, as well as several aspects of humanitarian aid, development and peacekeeping, and the fight against disinformation and cyber-attacks. It has also accentuated the debate about the future of multilateralism, a primary concern of EU foreign policy. Parliament is due to hear a statement on the issue from the High ...

The Covid-19 crisis has had economic, social, political and geopolitical consequences that will inevitably affect key aspects of EU foreign policy. These include relations with major powers, as well as several aspects of humanitarian aid, development and peacekeeping, and the fight against disinformation and cyber-attacks. It has also accentuated the debate about the future of multilateralism, a primary concern of EU foreign policy. Parliament is due to hear a statement on the issue from the High Representative during the June plenary session.

Kommende begivenheder

01-03-2021
Decarbonising European industry: hydrogen and other solutions (online event)
Workshop -
STOA
01-03-2021
Hearing on Transport of live animals in third countries
Høring -
ANIT
01-03-2021
Exchange of views with HR/VP Josep Borrell
Høring -
INGE

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