1129

resultat(er)

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Adopting the European Climate Law

21-06-2021

On 21 April 2021, negotiators from the European Parliament and the Council of the EU reached a provisional agreement on the legislative proposal for a European Climate Law, a cornerstone of the European Green Deal. The new regulation establishes a framework for achieving climate-neutrality in the EU by 2050. It sets a 2030 target of reducing the EU’s net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 55 %, compared to 1990 levels, envisages the use of a GHG budget for setting the 2040 target and establishes an ...

On 21 April 2021, negotiators from the European Parliament and the Council of the EU reached a provisional agreement on the legislative proposal for a European Climate Law, a cornerstone of the European Green Deal. The new regulation establishes a framework for achieving climate-neutrality in the EU by 2050. It sets a 2030 target of reducing the EU’s net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 55 %, compared to 1990 levels, envisages the use of a GHG budget for setting the 2040 target and establishes an independent European Scientific Advisory Board on Climate Change. The European Parliament is expected to vote on the text agreed in interinstitutional negotiations during its June II plenary session.

2030 climate target plan: extension of European Emission Trading System (ETS) to transport emissions

18-06-2021

The proceedings summarize the expert presentations and discussions of the workshop on the extension of the EU ETS to transport emissions. The workshop served to prepare the ENVI Committee for the upcoming legislative “Fit for 55” package of proposals, as part of the European Green Deal. The presentations focused on options and implications of the future inclusion of road transport, shipping and aviation in the EU ETS. This document was provided by the Policy Department for Economic, Scientific and ...

The proceedings summarize the expert presentations and discussions of the workshop on the extension of the EU ETS to transport emissions. The workshop served to prepare the ENVI Committee for the upcoming legislative “Fit for 55” package of proposals, as part of the European Green Deal. The presentations focused on options and implications of the future inclusion of road transport, shipping and aviation in the EU ETS. This document was provided by the Policy Department for Economic, Scientific and Quality of Life Policies for the committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety (ENVI).

Ekstern forfatter

Cristina URRUTIA, Jakob GRAICHEN, Anke HEROLD

Tackling Environmental Crimes under EU Law: The Liability of Companies in the Context of Corporate Mergers and Acquisitions

18-06-2021

This study addresses the fate of environmental liability and environmental crime under mergers and acquisitions. It analyses whether environmental liability is passed on, either to a successor or to a parent company. Also the role of companies in the Environmental Crime Directive is analysed with specific attention to succession of companies. Particular attention is given to the concept of ecocide. The study concludes that in case of a merger or acquisition environmental obligations are passed on ...

This study addresses the fate of environmental liability and environmental crime under mergers and acquisitions. It analyses whether environmental liability is passed on, either to a successor or to a parent company. Also the role of companies in the Environmental Crime Directive is analysed with specific attention to succession of companies. Particular attention is given to the concept of ecocide. The study concludes that in case of a merger or acquisition environmental obligations are passed on to the acquiring company. However, there is still the risk that corporations could organise their own insolvency. This can be remedied by imposing mandatory solvency guarantees. Criminal liability of an enterprise can in many legal systems also be transferred to the successor company.

Ekstern forfatter

Michael G. FAURE

Climate action in Germany: Latest state of play

10-06-2021

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. Germany submitted its NECP in June 2020. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Germany accounts for 24 % of net EU-27 emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG). Since 2005, emissions have steadily decreased, following the average trend in the Union. The carbon intensity of the German economy is falling ...

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. Germany submitted its NECP in June 2020. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Germany accounts for 24 % of net EU-27 emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG). Since 2005, emissions have steadily decreased, following the average trend in the Union. The carbon intensity of the German economy is falling, also mirroring the EU pattern. Energy industries are the largest source of emissions, responsible for 29 % of total emissions. Under EU effort-sharing legislation, by 2020 Germany was required to reduce its emissions by 14 % compared with 2005. However, the country exceeded its allocated emissions from 2016 to 2019. Germany's current 2030 target under the Effort-sharing Regulation (ESR) is to reduce emissions by 38 % from 2005 levels. According to the Commission's assessment of Germany's NECP, with the new proposed measures the reduction will fall short of the target by 3 percentage points. In 2019, renewable energy sources accounted for 17.4 % of gross final consumption, just 0.6 percentage points short of the target set for 2020. Following a court ruling on 24 March 2021, which found that the Climate Change Act was not aligned with fundamental rights, the German government announced its intention to strengthen its commitment, aiming to achieve net-zero emissions by 2045. This briefing is one in a series which will cover all EU Member States.

Climate action in Croatia: Latest state of play

10-06-2021

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) for the 2021 to 2030 period. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Croatia's final NECP is from December 2019. Croatia generates 0.7 % of the EU's total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced emissions at a slower pace than the EU average since 2005. The country's emissions intensity is significantly higher than the EU ...

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) for the 2021 to 2030 period. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Croatia's final NECP is from December 2019. Croatia generates 0.7 % of the EU's total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced emissions at a slower pace than the EU average since 2005. The country's emissions intensity is significantly higher than the EU average, though it is on a steady downward trend. The transport sector accounted for over a quarter of Croatia's total emissions in 2019. The Croatian building stock is also responsible for a significant share of total emissions. Energy industry emissions fell by almost 40 % between 2005 and 2019, reducing the sector's share of total emissions by six percentage points. The Croatian economy is heavily reliant on energy imports. Diversifying supply and reducing demand is seen as key to the transition process. Under EU effort-sharing legislation, Croatia was allowed to increase emissions until 2020 but must reduce these emissions by 7 % relative to 2005 by 2030. Croatia achieved a 28.5 % share of renewable energy sources in 2019. The country's 2030 target of a 36.4 % share is focused mainly on photovoltaics, wind and biofuels. Measures to boost energy efficiency centre on building stock renovation and energy efficiency obligation schemes for energy suppliers. This briefing is one in a series covering all EU Member States.

Climate action in Italy: Latest state of play

10-06-2021

The EU binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Italy's final NECP was sent in December 2019. Italy generates 11.4 % of the EU's total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced emissions at a faster pace than the EU average since 2005. Emissions decreased across all economic sectors in Italy over the ...

The EU binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Italy's final NECP was sent in December 2019. Italy generates 11.4 % of the EU's total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced emissions at a faster pace than the EU average since 2005. Emissions decreased across all economic sectors in Italy over the 2005-2019 period, with the agricultural sector showing the lowest reductions. The transport and 'other emissions' sectors, including buildings, account for almost half of Italy's total emissions. Energy industry emissions fell by 42 % between 2005 and 2019, leaving the sector in third place in terms of its share of total emissions. Under EU effort-sharing legislation, Italy reduced its emissions by 13 % by 2020 relative to 2005, and the country expects to reach the 2030 target of 33 %. Italy achieved an 18 % share of renewable energy sources (RES) in 2019. The country's 2030 target of a 30 % share is focused mainly on wind and solar power. Energy efficiency measures centre to a large extent on the building stock and transport sectors with support schemes for industry and households. This briefing is one in a series covering all EU Member States.

Climate action in Luxembourg: Latest state of play

10-06-2021

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) for the 2021-2030 period. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Luxembourg's final NECP is from May 2020. Luxembourg generates 0.34 % of the EU's total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced emissions at a slower pace than the EU average since 2005. Most economic sectors showed emissions reductions in the 2005-2019 period ...

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) for the 2021-2030 period. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Luxembourg's final NECP is from May 2020. Luxembourg generates 0.34 % of the EU's total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced emissions at a slower pace than the EU average since 2005. Most economic sectors showed emissions reductions in the 2005-2019 period, with the exception of agriculture and the 'other emissions' sectors. The transport sector and the 'other emissions' sector, which includes services and buildings, account for 77 % of Luxembourg's total emissions. Manufacturing and construction is the third largest sector in terms of emissions, accounting for 9 % of total emissions. Under EU effort-sharing legislation Luxembourg was supposed to reduce emissions by 20 % by 2020, and the 2030 obligation is 40 %. Luxembourg however expects to achieve a 55 % emissions reduction by 2030 in sectors outside the emissions trading system. Luxembourg reached a 7 % share of renewable energy sources (RES) in 2019 and expects in part to use cooperation mechanisms to reach the 2030 target of 25 % RES. Energy efficiency measures include both support and obligation schemes for industry, building renovations and transport electrification.

Harnessing the new momentum in transatlantic relations: Potential areas for common action during the Biden presidency

10-06-2021

The transatlantic relationship has been witnessing a significant injection of renewed enthusiasm and policy activity since Joe Biden became President of the United States in January 2021. This paper focuses on three important issues on the rapidly evolving transatlantic policy agenda, exploring their potential for generating, in effect, new 'common global goods' during the Biden presidency. First, it looks at pathways towards developing some kind of 'transatlantic green deal', taking climate action ...

The transatlantic relationship has been witnessing a significant injection of renewed enthusiasm and policy activity since Joe Biden became President of the United States in January 2021. This paper focuses on three important issues on the rapidly evolving transatlantic policy agenda, exploring their potential for generating, in effect, new 'common global goods' during the Biden presidency. First, it looks at pathways towards developing some kind of 'transatlantic green deal', taking climate action, trade and climate diplomacy in the round. Second, it analyses the comparative fabrics of US and European societies through the triple lens of violent extremism, the rule of law and technological disruption. Third, the prospects for 'crisis-proofing' the transatlantic space for the future are examined by looking at defence, health security and multilateralism. The paper also explores some potential avenues for closer transatlantic parliamentary cooperation, building on the already strong relationship between the European Parliament and the US Congress.

Biodiversity protection: Where do we stand?

04-06-2021

Based on Member States' reporting under the Birds and Habitats Directives, the backbone of European Union (EU) nature conservation policy, the latest assessment on the state of nature by the European Environment Agency shows that despite some encouraging developments, the overall picture remains bleak. Only 15 % of habitats and around 27 % of species protected under EU legislation have a good conservation status. An EU-wide assessment of terrestrial, freshwater and marine ecosystems found that, overall ...

Based on Member States' reporting under the Birds and Habitats Directives, the backbone of European Union (EU) nature conservation policy, the latest assessment on the state of nature by the European Environment Agency shows that despite some encouraging developments, the overall picture remains bleak. Only 15 % of habitats and around 27 % of species protected under EU legislation have a good conservation status. An EU-wide assessment of terrestrial, freshwater and marine ecosystems found that, overall, the condition of ecosystems in the EU is unfavourable. Worldwide, most indicators of ecosystems and biodiversity show rapid decline. Targets set to tackle biodiversity loss by 2020, at both EU and global levels under the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), have not been met. Under the EU biodiversity strategy for 2030, part of the European Green Deal, the EU has therefore set itself new targets for the next decade. These include enlarging the current network of legally protected areas to cover at least 30 % of the EU's land area and 30 % of the EU's seas; and setting legally binding EU nature restoration targets to restore degraded ecosystems. The recent zero-pollution action plan for air, water and soil proposes additional commitments relevant to biodiversity protection. Parties to the CBD, including the EU, are due to meet on 11-24 October 2021 in China to agree on a post-2020 global biodiversity framework. The EU intends to push for global 2030 targets in line with the commitments set out in its biodiversity strategy and for a much stronger implementation, monitoring and review process. The issue of resource mobilisation will be an important one, especially in the context of the coronavirus crisis, affecting the funding available for biodiversity. On 28 May 2021, Parliament's Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety adopted an own-initiative report with recommendations to strengthen the EU biodiversity strategy for 2030. The vote in plenary is scheduled for the June I plenary session.

Trade policy for the Biodiversity Strategy 2030

03-06-2021

International trade influences biodiversity through scale, composition and technique effects. Land and sea use change alter natural habitats, while emissions from production and transportation contribute to climate change. Among exports, animal-based agri-food products are particularly land-intensive. Trade policy can play a role in tackling these problems through stronger enforcement of biodiversity-related provisions in trade agreements. The EU Biodiversity Strategy 2030 commits to better assessing ...

International trade influences biodiversity through scale, composition and technique effects. Land and sea use change alter natural habitats, while emissions from production and transportation contribute to climate change. Among exports, animal-based agri-food products are particularly land-intensive. Trade policy can play a role in tackling these problems through stronger enforcement of biodiversity-related provisions in trade agreements. The EU Biodiversity Strategy 2030 commits to better assessing trade agreements’ potential impact on biodiversity and to better enforce biodiversity-related provisions. The Trade Committee of the European Parliament has adopted an opinion on the trade aspects of the new strategy.

Kommende begivenheder

28-06-2021
Child protection under EU law
Høring -
JURI
01-07-2021
EPRS online policy roundtable:The post-pandemic EU political system [...]
Anden begivenhed -
EPRS
01-07-2021
AIDA-ECON Public Hearing on AI and Financial Services
Høring -
AIDA ECON

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